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Date/Time of Last Update: Sun May 22 06:00:22 2022 UTC




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Overturning Roe v. Wade: "Irrational, Aggressive, and Extremely Dangerous"
Wed, 18 May 2022 10:01:57 +0000

Jordan Smith and law professor Melissa Murray discuss the Supreme Court’s leaked draft decision and its implications.

The post Overturning Roe v. Wade: “Irrational, Aggressive, and Extremely Dangerous” appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 0 Score: 85.71 source: theintercept.com age: 3 days
qualifiers: 42.86 genetic, 42.86 genes

Jeffrey Sachs Presents Evidence of Possible Lab Origin of Covid-19
Thu, 19 May 2022 20:00:50 +0000

An article in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences calls for an independent investigation of information held by U.S.-based institutions that could shed light on the origins of Covid.

The post Jeffrey Sachs Presents Evidence of Possible Lab Origin of Covid-19 appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 1 Score: 70.00 source: theintercept.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 50.00 genetic, 10.00 development, 10.00 california

Mozambique confirms first wild poliovirus case in 30 years
Thu, 19 May 2022 13:54:13 GMT

Case in child in Tete province follows detection of similar strain in Malawi in February, officials say

Mozambique has identified its first case of wild polio in three decades following the genetic sequencing of a similar strain of the childhood disease in Malawi earlier this year.

Dr Matshidiso Moeti, the World Health Organization’s regional director for Africa, said the detection of the new case was “greatly concerning” and that it demonstrated “how dangerous this virus is and how quickly it can spread”.

Continue reading...
Match ID: 2 Score: 60.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 50.00 genetic, 10.00 development

Extinction: Why scientists are freezing threatened species in 'biobanks'
Thu, 19 May 2022 15:00:36 GMT
Conservation scientists hope that preserving genetic material offers future insurance against extinction
Match ID: 3 Score: 50.00 source: www.bbc.co.uk age: 2 days
qualifiers: 50.00 genetic

Can the Artemis Moon Mission Revive the Glamour of Big Tech?
Tue, 17 May 2022 15:00:01 +0000


Today, the phrase “big tech” typically resonates negatively. It conjures up disturbing aspects of social media and the rise of megacorporations that seem beyond the reach of the law. And yet decades ago, big tech was typically associated with the glamor of motion: of speed, of power, and the thrill of exploring new frontiers.

Two leaders, Wernher von Braun and Juan Trippe, became household names as they made bold bets that paid off and enabled people to go where few thought it possible not long before. Von Braun had a troubling history: As a 30-year-old, he had convinced Adolf Hitler to fund his V-2 missiles, of which thousands were built, with slave labor. They rained down on Paris, London, and other cities, killing 9,000 people, mostly civilians.


But when von Braun’s Apollo program came to fruition, in the late 1960s, huge crowds gathered every few months on the Florida coast to watch the thundering Saturn V rockets take off. It was a partylike atmosphere and a joyous time. We humans were going to the moon, making a connection that had seemed both improbable and impossible just a few years before.

Pan Am’s landing in Manila marked the start of globalism, of our modern connectivity.

The rapturous crowds in Florida gathered during a turbulent time, with popular culture dominated by sex, drugs, rock and roll, and pervasive antiestablishment sentiment. And yet, in that unsettled era, techno-optimism somehow took root. The most religious experience I have ever had was during the astronauts’ live-to-Earth reading of Genesis from orbit around the moon on Christmas Eve, 1968.

Few probably realize that the big Apollo gatherings had a clear precedent in another mass outpouring of hope about large-scale human adventure. It occurred around San Francisco Bay at the height of the Great Depression, 30 years before the Apollo landings. Another indomitable spirit, Trippe, the president of Pan Am, was betting against all odds that he could open transpacific passenger service, and make it real on a timetable that no sober advisor believed possible.

This Martin M-130 flying boat, called the China Clipper, took off on a test flight from San Francisco Bay in October 1935—one month before it made the first commercial transpacific flight. FPG/Archive Photos/Getty Images

On 22 November 1935, the first transpacific commercial flight took to the skies. At 3:46 p.m., a Martin M-130 flying boat, the largest passenger plane built up to that point, lumbered into the air from Pan Am's base in Alameda, Calif., on the east side of San Francisco Bay. On that first trip, the plane carried only mail under contract to the U.S. post office.

Over 100,000 people had gathered around the bay to watch. Captain Edwin Musick powered the "China Clipper" northward in the bay and up over the waves. He planned to fly over the Bay Bridge, the double suspension bridge that today spans the bay and links San Francisco with Oakland. But he couldn't gain altitude quickly enough with the 4,000 gallons of fuel he was carrying. Fortunately, the roadway had not yet been hung from the catenaries, and he managed to fly under them. When he got to the Golden Gate Bridge, also under construction at the time, he just barely managed to get above it.

On the Clipper’s very first return flight from Honolulu to San Francisco, disaster was very narrowly averted when the big seaplane landed in the bay with just 1 minute of fuel left in its tanks.

When Musick and his crew arrived in the Philippines six days later, there were 200,000 people cheering wildly in Manila Harbor. Musick hand-delivered a letter from President Franklin D. Roosevelt to President Manuel Quezon of the Philippines. Quezon told Musick, "You have swept away forever the distance which from the beginning of time has separated the great continent of America from the beautiful islands of the Pacific." Pan Am’s landing in Manila marked the start of globalism, of our modern connectivity.

Today, as NASA’s Artemis mission heralds a new era of human space exploration, it’s important to remember how much difficulty and serendipity there was on the way to Manila and the moon. On the Clipper’s first return flight from Honolulu to San Francisco, disaster was very narrowly averted when the big seaplane landed in the bay with just 1 minute of fuel left in its tanks. Von Braun could have easily ended up dead or in Russia rather than in the United States.

Similarly, there will be many twists and turns on the way to the moon and Mars. The obvious successor to Trippe and von Braun would now seem to be Elon Musk—but maybe it’ll be someone else. Regardless, and despite our divisions and perhaps even future pandemics, people will undoubtedly come out in droves once again to witness the takeoffs and landings. At last, big tech will again be something to celebrate.

This article appears in the June 2022 print issue as “22 November 1935: The Day Globalism was Born.”


Match ID: 4 Score: 46.43 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 4 days
qualifiers: 35.71 genes, 10.71 musk

Acer Goes Big on Glasses-Free, 3D Monitors—Look Out, VR
Fri, 20 May 2022 14:54:57 +0000


Acer, the world’s fifth largest PC brand, wants to take the growing AR/VR market by the horns with its SpatialLabs glasses-free stereoscopic 3D displays.

First teased in 2021 in a variant of Acer’s ConceptD 7 laptop, the technology expands this summer in a pair of portable monitors, the SpatialLabs View and View Pro, and select Acer Predator gaming laptops. The launch is paired with artificial-intelligence-powered software for converting existing 2D content into stereoscopic 3D.

“We see a convergence of virtual and reality,” Jane Hsu, head of business Development for SpatialLabs, said in an interview. “It’s a different form for users to start interacting with a virtual world.” Glasses-free stereoscopic 3D isn’t new.

Evolutionary, not revolutionary

The technology has powered several niche products and prototypes, such as Sony’s Spatial Reality Display, but its most famous debut was Nintendo’s 3DS portable game console.

The 3DS filtered two images through a display layer called a parallax barrier. This barrier controlled the angle an image reached the user’s eyes to create the 3D effect. Because angle was important, the 3DS used cameras that detected the user’s eyes and adjusted the image to compensate for viewing angle.

“The PC in 2022 is encountering a lot of problems.”
—Jerry Kao, Acer

Acer’s technology is similar. It also displays two images which are filtered through an “optical layer” and has cameras to track and compensate for the user’s viewing angle.

So, what’s different this time?

“The fundamental difference is that the computing power is way different, and resolution is way different,” said Hsu. “The Nintendo, that was 800 by 240. In a sense, the technology is the same, but over time it has improved for a crystal-clear, high-resolution experience.”

Resolution is important to this form of glasses-free 3D. Because it renders two images to create the 3D effect, the resolution of the display is cut in half on the horizontal axis when 3D is on. The 3DS cut resolution to 400 by 240 when 3D was on and blurry visuals were a common complaint among critics.

Acer’s SpatialLabs laptops and displays are a big improvement. Each provides native 4K (3,840 by 2,160 resolution) in 2D. That’s 43 times the pixel count of Nintendo’s 3DS. Turning 3D on shaves resolution to 1,920 by 2,160, which, while lower, is still sharper than that of a 27-inch 4K monitor.

Hsu says advancements in AI compute are also key. Partners like Nvidia and Intel can now accelerate AI in hardware, a feature that wasn’t common a half decade ago.

Acer has harnessed this for SpatialLabs GO, a software utility that can convert full-screen content from 2D to stereoscopic 3D. This should make SpatialLabs useful with a wider range of content. It can also help creators generate content for use in stereoscopic 3D by importing and converting existing assets.

A new angle on augmented reality

Acer was a lead partner in Microsoft’s push for mixed-reality headsets. They were a flop, and their failure taught Acer hard lessons about how people approach AR/VR hardware in the real world.

“Acer spent a lot bringing VR headsets to market, but...it was not very successful,” Acer Co-COO Jerry Kao said in an interview. “There were limitations. It’s not comfortable, or it’s expensive, and you need space around you. So, we wanted to address this.”

SpatialLabs is a complementary alternative. Creators can use Spatial Labs to achieve a 3D effect in their home office without pushing aside furniture. The Acer View Pro, meant for commercial use, may have a future in retail displays, a use that headsets can't address.

A display in a store shows a shoe that seems to be coming out of the screen. The View Pro display is built for use in kiosks and retail displays.Acer

Most of the SpatialLabs product line, including the ConceptD 7 laptop and View displays, lean toward creative professionals using programs like Maya and Blender to create 3D content. Acer says its software suite has “out-of-the-box support for all major file formats.” It recently added support for Datasmith, a plug-in used to import assets to Epic’s Unreal Engine.

But the technology is also coming to Predator gaming laptops for glasses-free stereoscopic 3D in select titles like Forza Horizon 5 and The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt. Gaming seems a natural fit given its history in Nintendo’s handheld, and Hsu thinks it will help attract mainstream attention.

“When the Turn 10 team [developer of the Forza Horizon series] saw what we had done with Forza Horizon 5, they were like, ‘Wow, this is so great!’ ” said Hsu. “They said, ‘You know what? I think I can build the scene with even more depth.’ And this is just the beginning.”

Does glasses-free 3D really stand a chance?

SpatialLabs brings gains in resolution and performance, but it’s far from a surefire hit. Acer is the only PC maker currently pursuing the hardware. Going it alone won’t be easy.

“While the tech seems quite appealing, it will likely remain a niche product that’ll be used in rare instances by designers or developers rather than the average consumer,” Jitesh Ubrani, research manager at IDC, said in an email. He thinks Acer could find it difficult to deliver on price and availability, “both of which are tough to do for such a fringe technology.”

I asked Hsu how Acer will solve these issues. “In a way he’s right, it is difficult. We’re building this ourselves,” said Hsu. “But also, the hardware is more mature.”

Kao chimed in to say SpatialLabs will stand out in what might be weak year for home computers. “The PC in 2022 is encountering a lot of problems,” Kao said. He sees that as a motivation, not a barrier, for novel technology on the PC.

“Intel, Google, Microsoft, and a lot of people, they have technology,” said Kao. “But they don’t know how to leverage that technology in the product and deliver the experience to specific people. That is what Acer is good at.”


Match ID: 5 Score: 45.00 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 google, 10.00 microsoft, 10.00 development

Pennsylvania Surges Left at the Polls
Thu, 19 May 2022 21:09:53 +0000

Izzy Smith-Wade-El talks about his primary win in the race for a Pennsylvania state House seat.

The post Pennsylvania Surges Left at the Polls appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 6 Score: 40.00 source: theintercept.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 25.00 trade, 10.00 development, 5.00 uber

This Gene Mutation Breaks the Immune System. Why Has It Survived?
Tue, 17 May 2022 11:00:00 +0000
Two new studies found genetic mutations that cause severe immune deficiencies are common in some remote populations, leaving them highly vulnerable to viruses.
Match ID: 7 Score: 35.71 source: www.wired.com age: 4 days
qualifiers: 35.71 genetic

Ministério das Comunicações escondeu encontro de Bolsonaro com Elon Musk
Fri, 20 May 2022 21:57:04 +0000

A quatro dias da vinda do homem mais rico do mundo, ministério de Fábio Faria negou que houvesse qualquer reunião ou parceria com Musk.

The post Ministério das Comunicações escondeu encontro de Bolsonaro com Elon Musk appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 8 Score: 35.00 source: theintercept.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 15.00 musk, 10.00 tesla, 10.00 amazon

Video Friday: Drone in a Cage
Fri, 20 May 2022 20:39:41 +0000


Video Friday is your weekly selection of awesome robotics videos, collected by your friends at IEEE Spectrum robotics. We also post a weekly calendar of upcoming robotics events for the next few months. Please send us your events for inclusion.

ICRA 2022: 23 May–27 May 2022, PHILADELPHIA
IEEE ARSO 2022: 28 May–30 May 2022, LONG BEACH, CALIF.
RSS 2022: 21 June–1 July 2022, NEW YORK CITY
ERF 2022: 28 June–30 June 2022, ROTTERDAM, NETHERLANDS
RoboCup 2022: 11 July–17 July 2022, BANGKOK
IEEE CASE 2022: 20 August–24 August 2022, MEXICO CITY
CLAWAR 2022: 12 September–14 September 2022, AZORES, PORTUGAL

Enjoy today’s videos!


After four years of development, Flyability has announced the Elios 3, which you are more than welcome to smash into anything you like.

“The Elios 3 is the single biggest project that Flyability has ever undertaken,” said Adrien Briod, CTO of Flyability. “If you think of the Elios 2 as your classic flip phone, only designed to make phone calls, the Elios 3 is the smartphone. It’s made to be customized for the specific demands of each user, letting you attach the payload you need so you can use the tool as you like, and allowing it to grow and improve over time with new payloads or software solutions.”

[ Flyability ]

We get that Digit is good at walking under things, but if Agility wants to make the robot more relatable, it should program Digit to bump its head like 5 percent of the time. We all do it.

[ Agility ]

Skybrush is a drone-show management platform that’s now open source, and if drone shows aren’t your thing, it’s also good for coordinating multiple drones in any other way you want. Or you can make drone shows your thing!

We share Skybrush because we are proud of it, and because we envision a growing community around it, consisting of enthusiastic and motivated experts and users all around the world who can join our mission to create something great for the future. The drone industry is evolving at light speed, our team alone is too small yet to keep pace with it. But we have a core that is rock solid and we know for sure that great things can be built on top of it.

[ Skybrush ]

This happened back in the fall of 2021, but it’s still cool seeing the full video of a Gremlin launch, flight, and capture sequence.

[ Dynetics ]

NASA’s InSight lander touched down in the Elysium Planitia region of Mars in November of 2018. During its time on the Red Planet, InSight has achieved all its primary science goals and continues to hunt for quakes on Mars.

[ Insight ]

This kite-powered drone is blowing my mind.

[ Kite Propulsion ]

A friendly reminder that Tertill is anxious to massacre the weeds in your garden.

[ Tertill ]

I am not a fan of this ElliQ commercial.

[ ElliQ ]

We are excited to announce that the 2022 edition of the Swiss Drone Days will take place on 11–12 June in Dubendorf/Zurich. The event will feature live demos including autonomous drone racing...in one of the largest drone flying arenas in the world, spectacular drone races by the Swiss drone league, presentations of distinguished speakers, [and] an exhibition and trade fair.

[ Drone Days ]

Enjoy 8 minutes of fast-paced, extremely dramatic, absolutely mind-blowing robot football highlights.

[ RoboCup ]

This week’s GRASP on Robotics seminar is from Katherine Kuchenbecker at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, on haptics and physical human-robot interaction.

“A haptic interface is a mechatronic system that modulates the physical interaction between a human and their tangible surroundings. Such systems typically take the form of grounded kinesthetic devices, ungrounded wearable devices, or surface devices, and they enable the user to act on and feel a remote or virtual environment. I will elucidate key approaches to creating effective haptic interfaces by showcasing several systems my team created and evaluated over the years.”

[ UPenn ]

This Lockheed Martin Robotics Seminar is from Xuesu Xiao from The Everyday Robot Project at X, on Deployable Robots that Learn.

“While many robots are currently deployable in factories, warehouses, and homes, their autonomous deployment requires either the deployment environments to be highly controlled, or the deployment to only entail executing one single preprogrammed task. These deployable robots do not learn to address changes and to improve performance. For uncontrolled environments and for novel tasks, current robots must seek help from highly skilled robot operators for teleoperated (not autonomous) deployment. In this talk, I will present three approaches to removing these limitations by learning to enable autonomous deployment in the context of mobile robot navigation, a common core capability for deployable robots. Building on robust autonomous navigation, I will discuss my vision toward a hardened, reliable, and resilient robot fleet which is also task-efficient and continually learns from each other and from humans.”

[ UMD ]


Match ID: 9 Score: 35.00 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 trade, 10.00 development

Ollie's Bargain Outlet gets double upgraded at BofA, as inflation sparks 'trade-down' to closeout merchandise
Fri, 20 May 2022 14:44:50 GMT

Shares of Ollie's Bargain Outlet Holdings Inc. slipped 0.3% in morning trading Friday, but were outperforming the retail sector by a wide margin, after BofA Securities analyst Jason Haas swung to bullish from bearish on the closeout retailer, citing signs suggesting availability of closeout merchandise has "meaningfully improved" over the past several months. Haas double upgraded Ollie's stock to buy from underperform, and nearly doubled his stock price target to $75 from $39, with the new target implying 74% upside from current levels. The improved availability of merchandise comes as retailers over-ordered due to supply-chain concerns and after a sharp drop off in consumer spending on durable goods. Haas also said that as government support programs fade and given increasing inflation, he believes consumers will "trade-down" to Ollie's. His research indicates Ollie's prices are 36% below those of Walmart Inc. and Amazon.com Inc. . "In tougher times, consumers will sacrifice selection and shopping experience for better prices, and [Ollie's] has specifically been marketing this advantage to its customers," Haas wrote in a note to clients. Ollie's stock has lost 15.9% year to date. Meanwhile, the SPDR S&P Retail ETF , which slumped 2.0% in morning trading, has tumbled 32.0% this year and the S&P 500 has dropped 18.1%.

Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news.


Match ID: 10 Score: 35.00 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 trade, 10.00 amazon

Israel Used U.S. Weapons to Destroy U.S. Assets and Aid Projects in Gaza
Thu, 19 May 2022 18:43:50 +0000

Documents show that in 2021, arms made and funded by the United States destroyed UNRWA schools, USAID projects, and a Coca-Cola plant.

The post Israel Used U.S. Weapons to Destroy U.S. Assets and Aid Projects in Gaza appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 11 Score: 35.00 source: theintercept.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 25.00 trade, 10.00 development

Amazon’s 2022 Fire 7 tablet sports USB-C, dirt-cheap $74.99 price
Thu, 19 May 2022 17:21:16 +0000
There's also an ultra-durable "Kids" version for $110.
Match ID: 12 Score: 35.00 source: arstechnica.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 25.00 google, 10.00 amazon

Electrify America will be 100 percent solar-powered by 2023
Thu, 19 May 2022 17:00:54 +0000
As of April, its electricity is already 100 percent renewable.
Match ID: 13 Score: 35.00 source: arstechnica.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 15.00 musk, 10.00 tesla, 10.00 california

Google and Amazon Face Shareholder Revolt Over Israeli Defense Work
Wed, 18 May 2022 16:27:06 +0000

"Project Nimbus" would insulate the Israeli government's cloud computing from political pressures stemming from the military occupation of Palestine.

The post Google and Amazon Face Shareholder Revolt Over Israeli Defense Work appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 14 Score: 30.00 source: theintercept.com age: 3 days
qualifiers: 21.43 google, 8.57 amazon

Abortion Activists Need to Win Back the Culture Before We Can Win Back the Court
Wed, 18 May 2022 11:00:53 +0000

Make abortion normal again.

The post Abortion Activists Need to Win Back the Culture Before We Can Win Back the Court appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 15 Score: 30.00 source: theintercept.com age: 3 days
qualifiers: 21.43 google, 8.57 apple

Liz Truss rejects plea from Biden ally not to rewrite the Northern Ireland protocol
Sun, 22 May 2022 05:00:39 GMT

Foreign secretary tells Richard Neal, chair of the US Congress ways and means committee, that she cannot let the Brexit impasse drag on

Liz Truss is resisting pressure from a close ally of Joe Biden not to rewrite the Brexit deal’s Northern Ireland protocol, saying she will not let the impasse “drag on”.

The foreign secretary is facing concerted pressure from senior US politicians on the issue. Nancy Pelosi, the speaker of the House of Representatives, has already warned that she could endanger any hopes of a free trade deal with America.

Continue reading...
Match ID: 16 Score: 25.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 trade

Sustainable Investing: Elon Musk called ESG a scam — did the Tesla chief do investors a favor?
Sat, 21 May 2022 22:11:00 GMT
A major move to cut Tesla from a closely followed environmental, social and governance (ESG) index brought anger and relief in nearly equal measure.

Match ID: 17 Score: 25.00 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 15.00 musk, 10.00 tesla

Market Extra: The S&P 500 narrowly averts a bear market. How long do they last once they arrive?
Sat, 21 May 2022 17:56:00 GMT
The S&P 500 temporarily trades below the level that would mark a bear market. In the past, entering bear territory has often meant more weakness ahead.

Match ID: 18 Score: 25.00 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 trade

Plans to keep passengers moving and shelves stocked as rail strike looms
Sat, 21 May 2022 15:48:39 GMT

With 40,000 RMT members voting, union warns of ‘potentially biggest rail strike in modern history’

Contingency plans are being drawn up to try to keep passenger and freight trains running and prevent empty supermarket shelves after unions warned of “potentially the biggest rail strike in modern history”.

The National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers (RMT) is balloting 40,000 members on the industrial action, which network sources have reportedly said would create “serious challenges” in keeping goods moving and supermarket shelves stocked.

Continue reading...
Match ID: 19 Score: 25.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 trade

Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos have an unhealthy Twitter habit | John Naughton
Sat, 21 May 2022 15:00:22 GMT

They are two of the world’s richest people, and both are obsessed with space travel, but they use social media for very different reasons

Why do billionaires tweet? Is it because they no longer have to earn a living? Or because they’re bored? Or because they spend a lot of time in, er, the smallest room in the mansion? Elon Musk, for example, currently the world’s richest fruitcake, has said that “At least 50% of my tweets were made on a porcelain throne”, adding that “it gives me solace”. This revelation motivated the astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson to do some calculations, leading to the conclusion that more than 8,000 tweets over 12.5 years suggests that, on average, Musk “poops” twice a day. (I make it 1.75 a day, but that’s just quibbling.)

So why does Musk tweet so much? One explanation is that he just can’t help himself. He has, after all, revealed that he has Asperger’s. “Look, I know I sometimes say or post strange things,” he said on Saturday Night Live, “but that’s just how my brain works”. Understood. It may also be a partial explanation of his business success, because his mastery of SpaceX and Tesla suggests not only high intelligence but also an ability to focus intensely on exceedingly complex problems without being distracted by other considerations.

Continue reading...
Match ID: 20 Score: 25.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 15.00 musk, 10.00 tesla

Google Won’t Shut Down Your Legacy G Suite Account After All
Sat, 21 May 2022 13:00:00 +0000
And you can even keep your custom email address! But you need to confirm that your account is for personal, not business, use—here’s how.
Match ID: 21 Score: 25.00 source: www.wired.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 google

Analysis: Tesla brand threatened by Musk harassment claim, criticism of Democrats
2022-05-20T23:55:16+00:00
Analysis: Tesla brand threatened by Musk harassment claim, criticism of Democrats submitted by /u/realguiders
[link] [comments]

Match ID: 22 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 15.00 musk, 10.00 tesla

Dow, S&P 500 eke out gains Friday, but stocks book sharp weekly losses
Fri, 20 May 2022 20:04:36 GMT

Major U.S. stock indexes finished mostly higher Friday, eking out gains with a dramatic rally into the closing bell. The bounce allowed the S&P 500 index to narrowly avoid a bear-market finish, while ending the session virtually flat around 3,901. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose less than 0.1% and the Nasdaq Composite Index shed 0.3%. Stocks have been under sharp pressure this week as a string of big-box retailers from Walmart Inc. to Ross Stores, Inc. reported disappointing quarterly results, raising fears about a potential pullback in spending from consumers as the Federal Reserve looks to cool high inflation by raising rates and reducing its near $9 trillion balance sheet, but without sparking a recession. Market jitters also led investors to look for safety in government debt, with the 10-year Treasury yield falling to 2.785% Friday, retreating for a second week in a row. Bond yields and prices move in the opposite direction. Earlier in the session, the S&P 500 traded into bear-market territory, but required a close below 3,837.25 to make the status official, marking a fall of 20% or more from its Jan. 3 record close. For the week, the Dow recorded a 2.9% decline, its eighth straight weekly decline, and its longest stretch since April 1932, according to Dow Jones Market Data. The S&P 500 shed 3% for the week, while the Nasdaq lost 3.8%.

Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news.


Match ID: 23 Score: 25.00 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 trade

Market Extra: ‘Growth scare’ permeates U.S. stocks as estimated $5 trillion to $8 trillion of household wealth evaporates in five months
Fri, 20 May 2022 19:08:00 GMT

Four Paws/Agence France-Presse via Getty ImagesAmid a sea of red in U.S. stock markets on Friday, a fundamental shift in investors’ thinking is taking place, one which analysts describe as a “growth scare.”A “growth scare” is characterized by a correction in anticipation of slowing economic growth, even if such a slowdown hasn’t yet been borne out by the data. Dow industrials DJIA are poised for their longest streak of weekly losses in 90 years and the S&P 500 SPX appeared to be on track to close in bear-market territory, as investors flocked to Treasurys and the dollar as safe havens of choice. Friday’s broad-based selloff in equities punished every industry and every stock strategy —- from value and small-cap to growth, as well as the consumer-discretionary, energy, utilities, financial and tech sectors. Economists at JPMorgan Chase & Co. JPM estimate that U.S. household wealth has fallen by $5 trillion to $8 trillion in 2022, driven largely by falling equity prices. And BofA Securities strategists ranked U.S. equities as this year’s worst-performing asset class, as well as the third-biggest loser among global stocks ahead of only Chinese and German equities, based on data through Wednesday. Prior rounds of U.S. stock selloffs this year were largely driven by prospects of rising interest rates from the Federal Reserve, which is attempting to stomp out the highest inflation in four decades. While the risks of a recession or economic slowdown lingered in the backdrop, they hadn’t been brought to the fore. Many in financial markets have remained confident the U.S. can avoid a downturn, or speak of recession risks in terms of the next one to two years. Data released in April shows the U.S. economy shrank 1.4% during the first quarter, mainly because of a record U.S. trade deficit, following a 6.9% surge in GDP in the final three months of 2021. The National Bureau of Economic Research defines a recession as a significant decline in activity lasting more than a few months. But deteriorating stock values and financial conditions may have the potential to hasten the anticipated arrival of an economic downturn, according to some traders.“For a good portion of this year, we saw a positive correlation between equities and bonds: that is, a selloff in equities and selloff on bonds,” said Subadra Rajappa, head of U.S. rates strategy at Société Générale. “Now, we’re seeing a rally in bonds correspond to a selloff in equities. The subtle shift is that bonds are starting to act as safe haven, suggesting a growth scare and the potential for demand destruction that leads to lower growth.’’“Clearly, this week’s price action in stocks stems from earnings guidance and forward-looking guidance on consumer spending, signaling the potential for a retrenchment,’’ she said via phone. Still, Rajappa said she isn’t seeing any “concrete evidence” of a recession in the data, though some slowdown in growth can’t be ruled out. She also foresees no serious risk of recession in the next 12 months. As of Friday, there have been 59 negative earnings-per-share preannouncements issued by S&P 500 companies for the second quarter, and 32 that were positive, according to Refinitiv’s S&P 500 Earnings Scorecard. That compares with 55 that were negative and 28 which were positive a week ago.Read: S&P 500 earnings are another potential `shock’ awaiting financial markets trying to shake off stagflation fears: economistMeanwhile, the flight to safety in government bonds was felt most acutely in the longest-term maturities, sending 10- BX:TMUBMUSD10Y and 30-year rates BX:TMUBMUSD30Y below 2.8% and 3% respectively. Yields drop when demand for bonds goes up. The price action in bonds led to shrinking spreads between the 2-year BX:TMUBMUSD02Y and 10-year rates, as well as between 5-year BX:TMUBMUSD05Y and 30-year rates, which are seen as worrisome signs about the outlook. In addition, the 5-year rate traded above the 10-year yield, inverting that part of the curve. Meanwhile, the ICE U.S. Dollar Index DXY rose 0.5% to 103.24, not far from some of the highest levels in almost 20 years. Over the past two years, since the pandemic began, U.S. household wealth has increased by $30 trillion, Michael Feroli, JPMorgan’s chief U.S. economist, said via phone Friday. In a sense, the market is “giving back a little bit from a period of strong gains and households are generally still probably sitting on unrealized gains over the past year,” he said.  JPMorgan isn’t yet forecasting a recession and expects U.S. growth to remain positive through next year, Feroli said. “But the risks are pretty elevated and over the next two years it’s a coin flip as to whether we go into a recession.”

Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news.


Match ID: 24 Score: 25.00 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 trade

The Onion on Google Map Surveillance
2022-05-20T19:05:40Z

Google Maps Adds Shortcuts through Houses of People Google Knows Aren’t Home Right Now.”

Excellent satire.


Match ID: 25 Score: 25.00 source: www.schneier.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 google

Oracle’s Larry Ellison joined Nov. 2020 call about contesting Trump’s loss
Fri, 20 May 2022 15:04:06 EDT
The billionaire GOP donor, the biggest backer of Elon Musk’s attempted Twitter takeover, participated along with Fox’s Sean Hannity and Sen. Lindsey Graham, according to court filings and a participant.
Match ID: 26 Score: 25.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 15.00 musk, 10.00 amazon

Gold ends flat Friday, but books first weekly gain in a month
Fri, 20 May 2022 17:50:03 GMT

Gold prices closed flat on Friday, but booked a weekly gain, putting an end to the yellow metal's longest streak of weekly losses in four years. Gold for June delivery finished the session virtually unchanged, up just 90 cents, to settle at $1,842.10 an ounce on Comex, as continued volatility in equity markets led the S&P 500 index to trade below the threshold needed for it to enter a bear market. For the week, the most-active gold contract gained 1.8%, snapping a four-week skid that was its longest stretch of weekly losses since August 17, 2018, when it fell for six weeks in a row, according to Dow Jones Market Data.

Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news.


Match ID: 27 Score: 25.00 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 trade

Could Google’s Carbon Emissions Have Effectively Doubled Overnight?
Fri, 20 May 2022 17:21:41 +0000
A new report suggests that the money Big Tech companies keep in the banking system can do more climate damage than the products they sell.
Match ID: 28 Score: 25.00 source: www.newyorker.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 google

S&P 500 slips below bear-market threshold
Fri, 20 May 2022 16:39:47 GMT

The S&P 500 on Friday traded below 3,837.25, the level that marks a 20% pullback from the large-cap U.S. benchmark's Jan. 3 record close. A finish below that level would meet the traditional definition of a bear market. The S&P 500 was last at 3,837.48 after trading as low as 3,836.35.

Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news.


Match ID: 29 Score: 25.00 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 trade

Novavax stock drops after BofA's bearish call
Fri, 20 May 2022 16:08:09 GMT

Shares of Novavax Inc. sank 8.8% in midday trading Friday, after BofA Securities analyst Alec Stranahan recommended investors avoid the COVID-19 vaccine maker, citing a bearish view on continued booster use and increasing competition in the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and flu markets. Stranahan initiated coverage of Novavax at underperform and with a $35 stock price target, which implies about 34% downside from current levels. The stock has plunged 62.8% year to date, and has plummeted 83.3% from its post-COVID record close of $319.93 on Feb. 8, 2021, even as the Food the Drug Administration is set to meet June 7 to review Novavax's COVID-19 vaccine candidate, which has been authorized for use in several other countries. "Despite the recent pullback, we see room for shares to trade lower still, with our longer-term Nuvaxovid expectations meaningfully below consensus...given our bearish view on continued C-19 booster use, unclear benefit as a heterologous option, and waning immunity against new variants (i.e., Omicron)," Stranahan wrote in a note to clients. "Resolution on approvability in flu, RSV, and malaria are also still open questions, with these markets becoming increasingly crowded and emerging competitor data looking strong relative to what Novavax has shown."

Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news.


Match ID: 30 Score: 25.00 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 trade

Stocks open higher as Dow heads for longest weekly losing streak since 1932
Fri, 20 May 2022 13:35:12 GMT

Stocks opened higher Friday, attempting to bounce at the end of what's shaping up to be another losing week for major indexes. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up 217 points, or 0.7%, at 31,470, while the S&P 500 gained 0.9% to trade at 3,936. The Nasdaq Composite was up 1.2% near 11,522. The Dow and S&P 500 closed Thursday at their lowest since March 2021. The Dow was on track for a 2.3% weekly fall, which would be its eighth straight and the longest since 1932, according to Dow Jones Market Data.

Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news.


Match ID: 31 Score: 25.00 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 trade

Which Google Pixel Phone (and Gear) Should You Buy?
Fri, 20 May 2022 13:00:00 +0000
Here’s a guide to all the models—plus case recommendations and hidden software tricks to try.
Match ID: 32 Score: 25.00 source: www.wired.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 google

Match withdraws restraining order after Google agrees to 'various concessions'
Fri, 20 May 2022 13:00:18 GMT

Shares of Match Group Inc. surged 5.2% in premarket trading Friday, after the data apps company after Alphabet Inc.'s Google made "various concessions" regarding Match's complaints. As a result, Match said it has withdrawn its request for a temporary restraining order, which it said last week that it would ask a federal judge to issue to prevent the search engine from throwing Match off its Google Play app store. Alphabet's stock rose 1.0% ahead of the open. Match, which dating apps include Tinder, Match and OkCupid, said the concessions include a guarantee that Match apps will be allowed to offer users choice in payment systems. In addition, Google will approve Match app updates that offer alternatives to Google Play Billing. As part of the agreement between the companies, Match will put $40 million into an escrow account, instead of paying Google directly for billing transactions that occur outside of Google Play Billing, until the federal courts hears and adjudicates antitrust claims filed against Google on May 9. Match said it still believes the fees Google charges for payments outside of Google Play Billing are illegal. Match's stock has plunged 43.3% year to date through Thursday, while Alphabet shares have shed 23.8% and the S&P 500 has dropped 18.2%.

Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news.


Match ID: 33 Score: 25.00 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 google

Leafly draws outperform rating as Cowen initiatives coverage of cannabis marketplace
Fri, 20 May 2022 12:54:23 GMT

Leafly Holdings Inc. shares rose 2.6% in premarket trades Friday after the company drew an outperform rating and a $12 price target as Cowen analysts Harrison Vivas and Vivien Azer initiated coverage of the online cannabis marketplace. Leafly currently counts 8% more paid retailers than its rival company Weedmaps, which is run by WM Technology Inc. , analysts noted. Leafly's paid retailers on its network increased by 36% to 5,400 as of March 31, compared to Weedmaps count of 5,000 paid retailers, up 26% as of the same time period. Leafly's average revenue per account figures should get a boost from new adult use markets opening up in New Jersey, New York, Connecticut and Virginia, analysts said. Shares of Leafly are down 2.4% in 2022, compared to a drop of 45.6% by the AdvisorShares Pure US Cannabis ETF . Leafly went public in February by closing its merger with the special purpose acquisition company Merida Merger Corp. I.

Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news.


Match ID: 34 Score: 25.00 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 trade

The Online Spider Market Is Massive—and Crawling With Issues
Thu, 19 May 2022 19:35:00 +0000
A new study shows the enormous extent of the global arachnid trade, one that might be undermining wild populations.
Match ID: 35 Score: 25.00 source: www.wired.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 25.00 trade

Twitter deal leaves Elon Musk with no easy way out
Thu, 19 May 2022 17:54:48 +0000
Strength of $44B agreement comes into focus as Musk appears to have second thoughts.
Match ID: 36 Score: 25.00 source: arstechnica.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 15.00 musk, 10.00 tesla

Spyware Vendors Target Android With Zero-Day Exploits
Thu, 19 May 2022 16:00:00 +0000
New research from Google's Threat Analysis Group outlines the risks Android users face from the surveillance-for-hire industry.
Match ID: 37 Score: 25.00 source: www.wired.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 25.00 google

Tesla, Microsoft and Ubuntu bugs found during Pwn2Own hacking competition
2022-05-21T22:30:47+00:00
Tesla, Microsoft and Ubuntu bugs found during Pwn2Own hacking competition submitted by /u/geoxol
[link] [comments]

Match ID: 38 Score: 20.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 10.00 tesla, 10.00 microsoft

Remembering 1982 IEEE President Robert Larson
Fri, 20 May 2022 18:00:01 +0000


Robert E. Larson, 1982 IEEE president, died on 10 March at the age of 83.

An active volunteer who held many high-level positions throughout the organization, Larson was the 1975–1976 president of the IEEE Control Systems Society and also served as IEEE Foundation president.

Larson worked as a power engineer for Hughes Aircraft, IBM, the Stanford Research Institute (now SRI International), and other companies. He helped to found Systems Control, a computer system designer and manufacturer in Palo Alto, Calif., and he was its chief executive for almost 15 years.

He also volunteered with IEEE Smart Village, a program that brings electricity—as well as educational and employment opportunities—to remote communities.

Smart Village cofounder IEEE Life Fellow Ray Larsen says Larson rarely missed the program’s biweekly meetings.

“He and his wife, Sue, became generous donors. Bob and I often had lunch, where I updated him on our latest challenges,” Larsen says. “It was a great honor to benefit from his deep wisdom, constant support, and friendship.”

CHOOSING ENGINEERING

Larson was born in Stockton, Calif., where his father was a physics professor at the University of the Pacific. In 1942 his father was recruited to work on the Manhattan Project, so the family moved to Oak Ridge, Tenn., where the plutonium and the uranium enrichment plants were located.

“Oak Ridge was a very scientifically oriented community,” especially during World War II, Larson said in a 2009 oral history conducted by the IEEE History Center. “Therefore, I was slated to go into science in some respect. My father’s preference was that I would become a medical doctor, but I got interested in computers at an early age. I built computers when I was in high school using telephone relays and things of that sort.”

He earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering in 1960 from MIT. While pursuing his degree, he worked at IBM on its first transistorized supercomputer: IBM 7030, known as Stretch. The computer’s development led to software and hardware such as multiprogramming, memory protection, and CPUs to be incorporated in IBM’s line of computers.

Larson moved back to California to continue his education in “warmer weather,” according to his oral history. He received a master’s degree in EE from Stanford in 1961, then continued at the school as a doctoral student. He conducted his thesis research at Hughes Aircraft, where he designed computers for spacecraft.

After graduating in 1964, he joined SRI, where he worked on ballistic missile defense and electric power systems. While there, he developed tracking technology for missile reentry vehicles. He also designed technology for an air defense system that could remotely shoot down enemy missiles.

He left SRI after four years and, along with several coworkers, founded Systems Control. The company was sold to British Petroleum in 1982.

From 1983 to 2012, Larson served as a general partner and technical advisor to the Woodside Fund, a venture-capital firm in Redwood City, Calif.

He was a consulting professor in the engineering-economics systems department at Stanford from 1973 to 1988.

Larson was the founding president of the U.S.-China Green Energy Council in 2008. The nonprofit, based in Silicon Valley, promotes collaboration between the two countries to help develop technology to combat climate change.

“Larson’s contribution in the U.S.-China collaboration was priceless,” the organization’s leaders wrote on its website. “He was a role model to not only his peers but also to the next generation. His voice and smile will always remain in our hearts.”

AN ACTIVE VOLUNTEER

He joined the Institute of Radio Engineers, one of IEEE’s predecessor societies, in 1958 as a student member at the suggestion of his father.

Larson told the History Center that his father explained to him that if he was serious about working with computers, he should “join an organization that will give you information and people you can talk to and network with.”

He was honored with the 1968 Outstanding Young Electrical Engineer Award from IEEE-Eta Kappa Nu, IEEE’s honor society.

Larson began volunteering in 1968 as an editorial board member of IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control. He went on to become the editor and served for nearly five years.

He then served on the IEEE Control Systems Society’s administration committee and became the society’s 1975 president. He was 1978 Division I director, and vice president, Technical Activities. He was elected as IEEE president in 1982 and also served as IEEE Foundation president.

Larson was a member of the IEEE Heritage Circle—a cumulative giving donor recognition group. He pledged more than US $10,000 to support IEEE programs such as the History Center and Smart Village. His family made a donation in his memory to Smart Village through the IEEE Foundation. The family has invited others to make donations in his name.

To share your condolences or memories of Robert Larson, please use the commenting form below.


Match ID: 39 Score: 20.00 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 development, 10.00 california

Make sexy, smoky cocktails with grilled citrus, pineapple and more
Fri, 20 May 2022 11:00:57 EDT
For grilled fruit cocktails, try charring lemons, grapefruit and pineapple for richer and smokier juices.
Match ID: 40 Score: 20.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 apple, 10.00 amazon

FBI Provides Chicago Police With Fake Online Identities for "Social Media Exploitation" Team
Fri, 20 May 2022 11:30:38 +0000

Internal documents also reveal that police can take over informants’ social media accounts and pose as them online.

The post FBI Provides Chicago Police With Fake Online Identities for “Social Media Exploitation” Team appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 41 Score: 20.00 source: theintercept.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 california, 10.00 amazon

Why These Members Donate to the IEEE Foundation
Fri, 13 May 2022 18:00:01 +0000


The IEEE Foundation partners with donors to enable more than 250 IEEE programs to help advance technology for the benefit of humanity. The Foundation’s support is made possible, in part, by the gifts from its generous donors.

The IEEE Heritage Circle recognizes individual donors’ philanthropic spirit. Each level of the Heritage Circle is named for one of six great innovators in the fields of science and technology: Nikola Tesla, Alexander Graham Bell, Thomas Alva Edison, James Clerk Maxwell, Michael Faraday, and Alessandro Volta.


Here is a look at some of those who have made contributions and what programs they support.

THE TESLA LEVEL

Members at this level have pledged more than US $10,000. The Tesla level is the most common among givers.

Henry Samueli Henry Samueli BROADCOM

Henry Samueli, cofounder of Broadcom and recipient of more than 75 U.S. patents, is passionate about encouraging and supporting the next generation of engineers. While he was an engineering professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, Samueli helped found company in San Jose, Calif., in 1991 with one of his Ph.D. students, Henry T. Nicholas. Samueli contributes to IEEE–Eta Kappa Nu, the honor society. The IEEE Life Fellow is a member of IEEE-HKN’s Iota Gamma Chapter, and in 2019, he received the honor society’s highest recognition: eminent member.

Hei received the 2021 IEEE Founders Medal for “leadership in research, development, and commercialization of broadband communication and networking technology with global impact.” He donated the full cash prize of $10,000 to the IEEE Foundation’s Awards Program Fund.

Steve Wozniak, a Silicon Valley icon, cofounded Apple with Steve Jobs in 1976 and helped shape the computing industry by engineering the groundbreaking Apple I and Apple II computers, as well as the Macintosh. What people might not know is that Wozniak is also a member of IEEE-HKN’s Mu Chapter. The IEEE Fellow received the 2021 IEEE Masaru Ibuka Consumer Electronics Award “for pioneering the design of consumer-friendly personal computers.”

He donated his $10,000 prize to IEEE-HKN.

IEEE Member Mary Ellen Zellerbach’s investing success is impressive. As part of the original pioneering index fund team at Wells Fargo Advisors, she introduced and managed the first international index fund. Zellerbach also played a key role in placing the first Standard & Poor’s 500 index futures trade on behalf of a U.S. institutional investor. She is currently managing director of Martin Investment Management, a majority-women-owned firm in Evanston, Ill.

After 11 years of serving on the IEEE Investment Committee, Zellerbach was elected 2022 director of the IEEE Foundation Board. She donates to the Foundation in support of its fund and other programs.

Even though IEEE Life Member Jack Jewell has been active with IEEE for more than 30 years, he says his mouth still waters when he receives the latest Photonics Technology Letters in the mail. So when Jewell won the prestigious IEEE Photonics Award last year from the IEEE Photonics Society for his “seminal and sustained contributions to the development and commercialization of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers,” he decided to give back to the organization that has given him so much.

“Contributing to IEEE extends our capabilities beyond our own personal professions,” Jewell said when asked why he donated the $10,000 cash prize. “I hope that the donations will enhance people’s lives, both professionally and personally.”

His donation is helping to support IEEE REACH (Raising Engineering Awareness through the Conduit of History), the IEEE Foundation Fund, the IEEE Photonics Society, and the IEEE Awards program.

THE ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL LEVEL

These members have pledged more than $50,000.

Lewis “Lew” TermanIEEE Foundation

Lewis “Lew” Terman joined the Institute of Radio Engineers, one of IEEE’s predecessor societies, as a student member in 1958 at the suggestion of his father, who was then the IRE president. The IEEE Life Fellow, who served as 2008 IEEE president, has been a member ever since. When speaking about his history with the organization, Terman says that one could say “IEEE is in my genes.”

Terman and his wife, Bobbie, have been steadfast supporters of the IEEE Foundation’s programs throughout the years. Their donations have supported IEEE Smart Village, which brings electricity, education, and economic development to energy-deprived communities around the world, and EPICS (Engineering Projects in Community Service) in IEEE. EPICS empowers students to apply technical solutions to aid their communities.

THE THOMAS ALVA EDISON LEVEL

These members have pledged more than $100,000.

In celebration of his 50-year anniversary as a member of IEEE and IEEE-HKN last year, John McDonald and his wife, Jo-Ann, have made a four-year pledge split between two programs to the IEEE Foundation. One of their gifts will go to the IEEE Power & Energy Society’s Scholarship Plus Initiative, which nurtures budding power and electrical engineers through scholarships, mentoring opportunities, and internships. The program is especially important to McDonald, as he spent five years volunteering on the initiative’s scholarship selection committee. McDonald is a distinguished lecturer for IEEE PES and teaches classes on the smart grid.

The McDonalds’ other gift supports the IEEE–Eta Kappa Nu Student Chapter Support Fund. The new program aims to generate money and develop training for HKN chapters. The fund also supports the creation of a chapter grant program and chapter coaching program. The initiative is near and dear to his heart, McDonald says, as he has been a member of IEEE-HKN’s Beta Chapter since 1971. He joined as an undergrad at Purdue University, in West Lafayette, Ind.

John McDonald & Bahman Hoveida John McDonald and Bahman HoveidaIEEE Foundation

THE ALESSANDRO VOLTA LEVEL

These members have pledged more than $1 million.

Bahman Hoveida joined IEEE as a student member at the suggestion of one of his electrical engineering professors at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. The IEEE life senior member created the Hoveida Family Foundation, in Bainbridge Island, Wash., to support the next generation of electrical engineers. The nonprofit awards grants to support scientific and academic programs in the United States.

The Hoveida Family Foundation also donates to the IEEE PES Scholarship Plus Initiative. Of the 72 high-achieving power and energy engineering students to be named a 2021–2022 PES Scholar, 33 are Hoveida Foundation scholars.

CONTINUING IMPORTANT WORK

To become part of the IEEE Heritage Circle, visit the IEEE Foundation’s website or send a message to donate@ieee.org. To learn more about Foundation donors, programs, scholarships, and grants, follow the Foundation on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter or IEEE Collabratec.


Match ID: 42 Score: 20.00 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 8 days
qualifiers: 7.14 genes, 3.57 trade, 3.57 google, 1.43 tesla, 1.43 development, 1.43 california, 1.43 apple

Simple, Cheap, and Portable: A Filter-Free Desalination System for a Thirsty World
Tue, 17 May 2022 17:08:25 +0000


MIT researchers have developed a prototype of a suitcase-size device that can turn seawater into safe drinking water.

According to the International Desalination Association, more than 300 million people around the world now get their drinking water from the sea. With climate change exacerbating water scarcity globally, seawater desalination is stepping in to fill the void. But whereas commercial desalination plants are designed to meet large-scale demand, there is also a need for portable systems that can be carried into remote regions or set up as stand-ins for municipal water works in the wake of a disaster.

A group of scientists from MIT has developed just such a portable desalination unit; it’s the size of a medium suitcase and weighs less than 10 kilograms. The unit’s one-button operation requires no technical knowledge. What’s more, it has a completely filter-free design. Unlike existing portable desalination systems based on reverse osmosis, the MIT team’s prototype does not need any high-pressure pumping or maintenance by technicians.

The MIT researchers described their invention in a paper titled “Portable Seawater Desalination System for Generating Drinkable Water in Remote Locations.” The paper was posted in the 14 April online edition of Environmental Science & Technology, a publication of the American Chemical Society.

The unit uses produces 0.3 liters of potable drinking water per hour, while consuming a minuscule 9 watt-hours of energy. Plant-scale reverse-osmosis water-treatment operations may be three to four times as energy efficient, and yield far greater quantities of freshwater at much faster rates, but the researchers say the trade-off in terms of weight and size makes their invention the first and only entrant in a new desalination niche.

The most notable feature of the unit is its unfiltered design. A filter is a barrier that catches the impurities you don’t want in your water, explains Jongyoon Han, an electrical and biological engineer, and lead author of the study. “We don’t have that specifically because it always tends to clog, and [then] you need to replace it.” This makes traditional portable systems challenging for laypeople to use. Instead, the researchers use ion-concentration polarization (ICP) and electrodialysis (ED) to separate the salt from the water.

“Instead of filtering, we are nudging the contaminants [in this case, salt] away from the water,” Han says. This portable unit, he adds, is a good demonstration of the effectiveness of ICP desalination technology. “It is quite different from other technologies, in the sense that I can remove both large particles and solids all together.”

Hands hold a frame which contains a white rectangle of material with 6 strips on top of it. The setup includes a two-stage ion-concentration polarization (ICP) process, with water flowing through six modules in the first stage and then three in the second stage, followed by a single electrodialysis process.M. Scott Brauer

ICP uses an ion-selective membrane that allows the passage of one kind of ion when current is applied—either cations or anions. “What happens is that, [if] these membranes can transfer only cations, what about the anions?” Han asks. “The anions disappear near the membrane because nature really doesn’t like free ions hanging around…. So, [as a result, there is a region] near the membrane that is salt-free.” The salt-free region is the spot from which freshwater is harvested.

“What is unique about our technology is that we figured out a way to separate…a diverse array of contaminants [from water] in a single process,” says Han. “So we can go [straight] from seawater to drinkable water.”

It takes 40 liters of seawater to yield a single liter of drinking water. This 2.5 percent recovery rate might seem like a high environmental cost, says Junghyo Yoon, a researcher at Han’s lab. But Yoon reminds us that seawater is an infinite resource, so a low recovery rate is not a significant issue.

A hand adjusts a screw on a white box which sandwiches beige layers of material. The portable device does not require any replacement filters, which greatly reduces the long-term maintenance requirements.M. Scott Brauer

The MIT group’s device is an out-of-the box system; you can just power it up, connect it to a saltwater source, and wait for potable water. “The box includes the battery and…[it is] like a typical laptop battery, anywhere between 60 and 100 watts,” Han says. “We think that that can operate for about a day or so.” A solar panel is another option, especially in a disaster zone, where there might not be an accessible electric power source.

Yoon points out that the results reported in the group’s paper are already a year old. “[Since we recorded the results listed in the paper], we have successfully ramped up the desalination rate to 1 liter [of freshwater] per hour,” he reports. “We are pushing ourselves to scale up to 10 liters per hour for practical applications.” He hopes to secure enough investment by the end of this year to take the next steps toward commercialization. “We expect that we can have the first prototype available for beta testing by the end of 2023. [We predict that] he cost will be [US] $1,500,” says Yoon.

That price will be far cheaper than portable desalination systems currently on the market—mostly models using reverse-osmosis filtration, which go for around $5,000. “Although they have higher flow rates and generate a larger amount of clean water because [they] are bigger, they are generally not so user friendly,” Han says. “Our system is much smaller, and uses much less power. And the goal here is to generate just enough water, in a manner that is very user friendly to address this particular need of disaster relief.”

Aside from the flow rate, Han is also not happy with the device’s energy consumption at present. “We don’t think is actually optimal,” he says. “Although [its energy efficiency] is good enough, it can always be made better by optimizing the [process].”


Match ID: 43 Score: 17.86 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 4 days
qualifiers: 17.86 trade

Practical Power Beaming Gets Real
Sat, 21 May 2022 15:00:01 +0000


Wires have a lot going for them when it comes to moving electric power around, but they have their drawbacks too. Who, after all, hasn’t tired of having to plug in and unplug their phone and other rechargeable gizmos? It’s a nuisance.

Wires also challenge electric utilities: These companies must take pains to boost the voltage they apply to their transmission cables to very high values to avoid dissipating most of the power along the way. And when it comes to powering public transportation, including electric trains and trams, wires need to be used in tandem with rolling or sliding contacts, which are troublesome to maintain, can spark, and in some settings will generate problematic contaminants.


Many people are hungry for solutions to these issues—witness the widespread adoption over the past decade of wireless charging, mostly for portable consumer electronics but also for vehicles. While a wireless charger saves you from having to connect and disconnect cables repeatedly, the distance over which energy can be delivered this way is quite short. Indeed, it’s hard to recharge or power a device when the air gap is just a few centimeters, much less a few meters. Is there really no practical way to send power over greater distances without wires?

To some, the whole notion of wireless power transmission evokes images of Nikola Tesla with high-voltage coils spewing miniature bolts of lightning. This wouldn’t be such a silly connection to make. Tesla had indeed pursued the idea of somehow using the ground and atmosphere as a conduit for long-distance power transmission, a plan that went nowhere. But his dream of sending electric power over great distances without wires has persisted.

To underscore how safe the system was, the host of the BBC science program “Bang Goes the Theory” stuck his face fully into a power beam.

Guglielmo Marconi, who was Tesla’s contemporary, figured out how to use “Hertzian waves,” or electromagnetic waves, as we call them today, to send signals over long distances. And that advance brought with it the possibility of using the same kind of waves to carry energy from one place to another. This is, after all, how all the energy stored in wood, coal, oil, and natural gas originally got here: It was transmitted 150 million kilometers through space as electromagnetic waves—sunlight—most of it millions of years ago.

Can the same basic physics be harnessed to replace wires today? My colleagues and I at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, in Washington, D.C., think so, and here are some of the reasons why.

There have been sporadic efforts over the past century to use electromagnetic waves as a means of wireless power transmission, but these attempts produced mixed results. Perhaps the golden year for research on wireless power transmission was 1975, when William Brown, who worked for Raytheon, and Richard Dickinson of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (now retired) used microwaves to beam power across a lab with greater than 50 percent end-to-end efficiency. In a separate demonstration, they were able to deliver more than 30 kilowatts over a distance of about a mile (1.6 kilometers).

These demonstrations were part of a larger NASA and U.S. Department of Energy campaign to explore the feasibility of solar-power satellites, which, it was proposed, would one day harvest sunlight in space and beam the energy down to Earth as microwaves. But because this line of research was motivated in large part by the energy crisis of the 1970s, interest in solar-power satellites waned in the following decades, at least in the United States.

Although researchers revisit the idea of solar-power satellites with some regularity, those performing actual demonstrations of power beaming have struggled to surpass the high-water mark for efficiency, distance, and power level reached in 1975. But that situation is starting to change, thanks to various recent advances in transmission and reception technologies.

In this image, a narrow purple beam shines across a darkened room. During a 2019 demonstration at the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Bethesda, Md., this laser beam safely conveyed 400 watts over a distance of 325 meters.U.S. Naval Research Laboratory

Most early efforts to beam power were confined to microwave frequencies, the same part of the electromagnetic spectrum that today teems with Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and various other wireless signals. That choice was, in part, driven by the simple fact that efficient microwave transmitting and receiving equipment was readily available.

But there have been improvements in efficiency and increased availability of devices that operate at much higher frequencies. Because of limitations imposed by the atmosphere on the effective transmission of energy within certain sections of the electromagnetic spectrum, researchers have focused on microwave, millimeter-wave, and optical frequencies. While microwave frequencies have a slight edge when it comes to efficiency, they require larger antennas. So, for many applications, millimeter-wave or optical links work better.

For systems that use microwaves and millimeter waves, the transmitters typically employ solid-state electronic amplifiers and phased-array, parabolic, or metamaterial antennas. The receiver for microwaves or millimeter waves uses an array of elements called rectennas. This word, a portmanteau of rectifier and antenna, reflects how each element converts the electromagnetic waves into direct-current electricity.

Any system designed for optical power transmission would likely use a laser—one with a tightly confined beam, such as a fiber laser. The receivers for optical power transmission are specialized photovoltaic cells designed to convert a single wavelength of light into electric power with very high efficiency. Indeed, efficiencies can exceed 70 percent, more than double that of a typical solar cell.

At the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, we have spent the better part of the past 15 years looking into different options for power beaming and investigating potential applications. These include extending the flight times and payload capacities of drones, powering satellites in orbit when they are in darkness, powering rovers operating in permanently shadowed regions of the moon, sending energy to Earth’s surface from space, and distributing energy to troops on the battlefield.

You might think that a device for sending large amounts of energy through the air in a narrow beam sounds like a death ray. This gets to the heart of a critical consideration: power density. Different power densities are technically possible, ranging from too low to be useful to high enough to be dangerous. But it’s also possible to find a happy medium between these two extremes. And there are also clever ways to permit beams with high power densities to be used safely. That’s exactly what a team I was part of did in 2019, and we’ve successfully extended this work since then.

One of our industry partners, PowerLight Technologies, formerly known as LaserMotive, has been developing laser-based power-beaming systems for more than a decade. Renowned for winning the NASA Power Beaming Challenge in 2009, this company has not only achieved success in powering robotic tether climbers, quadcopters, and fixed-wing drones, but it has also delved deeply into the challenges of safely beaming power with lasers. That’s key, because many research groups have demonstrated laser power beaming over the years—including teams at the Naval Research Laboratory, Kindai University, the Beijing Institute of Technology, the University of Colorado Boulder, JAXA, Airbus, and others—but only a few have accomplished it in a fashion that is truly safe under every plausible circumstance.

This diagram shows the peak power levels and distance achieved in 11 power-beaming demonstrations carried out between 1975 and 2021 There have been many demonstrations of power beaming over the years, using either microwaves [blue] or lasers [red], with the peak-power record having been set in 1975 [top]. In 2021, the author and his colleagues took second and third place for the peak-power level achieved in such experiments, having beamed more than a kilowatt over distances that exceeded a kilometer, using much smaller antennas. David Schneider

Perhaps the most dramatic demonstration of safe laser power beaming prior to our team’s effort was by the company Lighthouse Dev in 2012. To underscore how safe the system was, the host of the BBC science program “Bang Goes the Theory” stuck his face fully into a power beam sent between buildings at the University of Maryland. This particular demonstration took advantage of the fact that some infrared wavelengths are an order of magnitude safer for your eyes than other parts of the infrared spectrum.

That strategy works for relatively low-power systems. But as you push the level higher, you soon get to power densities that raise safety concerns regardless of the wavelength used. What then? Here’s where the system we’ve demonstrated sets itself apart. While sending more than 400 watts over a distance that exceeded 300 meters, the beam was contained within a virtual enclosure, one that could sense an object impinging on it and trigger the equipment to cut power to the main beam before any damage was done. Other testing has shown how transmission distances can exceed a kilometer.

Careful testing (for which no BBC science-program hosts were used) verified to our satisfaction the functionality of this feature, which also passed muster with the Navy’s Laser Safety Review Board. During the course of our demonstration, the system further proved itself when, on several occasions, birds flew toward the beam, shutting it off—but only momentarily. You see, the system monitors the volume the beam occupies, along with its immediate surroundings, allowing the power link to automatically reestablish itself when the path is once again clear. Think of it as a more sophisticated version of a garage-door safety sensor, where the interruption of a guard beam triggers the motor driving the door to shut off.

The 400 watts we were able to transmit was, admittedly, not a huge amount, but it was sufficient to brew us some coffee.

For our demonstrations, observers in attendance were able to walk around between the transmitter and receiver without needing to wear laser-safety eyewear or take any other precautions. That’s because, in addition to designing the system so that it can shut itself down automatically, we took care to consider the possible effects of reflections from the receiver or the scattering of light from particles suspended in the air along the path of the beam.

This set of three images shows a large white parabolic dish at the top, a gold-colored square in the middle, and a tall metal tower at the bottom. Last year, the author and his colleagues carried out a demonstration at the U.S. Army’s Blossom Point test facility south of Washington, D.C. They used 9.7-gigahertz microwaves to send 1,649 watts (peak power) from a transmitter outfitted with a 5.4-meter diameter parabolic dish [top] over a distance of 1,046 meters to a 2-by-2-meter “rectenna” [middle] mounted on a tower [bottom], which transformed the beam into usable electric power.U.S. Naval Research Laboratory

The 400 watts we were able to transmit was, admittedly, not a huge amount, but it was sufficient to brew us some coffee, continuing what’s become de rigueur in this line of experimentation: making a hot beverage. (The Japanese researchers who started this tradition in 2015 prepared themselves some tea.)

Our next goal is to apply power beaming, with fully integrated safety measures, to mobile platforms. For that, we expect to increase the distance covered and the amount of power delivered.

But we’re not alone: Other governments, established companies, and startups around the world are working to develop their own power-beaming systems. Japan has long been a leader in microwave and laser power beaming, and China has closed the gap if not pulled ahead, as has South Korea.

At the consumer-electronics level, there are many players: Powercast, Ossia, Energous, GuRu, and Wi-Charge among them. And the multinational technology giant Huawei expects power beaming for smartphone charging within “two or three [phone] generations.”

For industrial applications, companies like Reach Labs, TransferFi, MH GoPower, and MetaPower are making headway in employing power beaming to solve the thorny problem of keeping batteries for robots and sensors, in warehouses and elsewhere, topped off and ready to go. At the grid level, Emrod and others are attempting to scale power beaming to new heights.

On the R&D front, our team demonstrated within the past year safe microwave wireless power transmission of 1.6 kilowatts over a distance of a kilometer. Companies like II-VI Aerospace & Defense, Peraton Labs, Lighthouse Dev, and others have also recently made impressive strides. Today, ambitious startups like Solar Space Technologies, Solaren, Virtus Solis, and others operating in stealth mode are working hard to be the first to achieve practical power beaming from space to Earth.

As such companies establish proven track records for safety and make compelling arguments for the utility of their systems, we are likely to see whole new architectures emerge for sending power from place to place. Imagine drones that can fly for indefinite periods and electrical devices that never need to be plugged in—ever—and being able to provide people anywhere in the world with energy when hurricanes or other natural disasters ravage the local power grid. Reducing the need to transport fuel, batteries, or other forms of stored energy will have far-reaching consequences. It’s not the only option when you can’t string wires, but my colleagues and I expect, within the set of possible technologies for providing electricity to far-flung spots, that power beaming will, quite literally, shine.

This article appears in the June 2022 print issue as “Spooky Power at a Distance.”


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Why It's So Hard to Count Twitter Bots
Wed, 18 May 2022 16:15:09 +0000
Elon Musk's method for tracking down bots may be useless, but finding a better formula is tougher than you think.
Match ID: 45 Score: 12.86 source: www.wired.com age: 3 days
qualifiers: 12.86 musk

Australia election 2022 live: PM-elect Albanese wants to ‘change the way politics works’; Dutton front-runner to lead Liberals; Tim Wilson concedes Goldstein
Sun, 22 May 2022 05:49:59 GMT

Anthony Albanese to be sworn in ahead of Quad meeting; Scott Morrison praises ‘great foundation’ of church as speculation over next Liberal leader begins; Labor hopeful of forming majority government; nation records 20 Covid deaths. Follow all the day’s developments

That Paul Karp wields his words real good:

The Liberals flirted with turning the ABC coverage on blast on the big screen, but when Antony Green observed that he couldn’t see the Liberals winning more than 70 seats, suddenly the feed was cut in favour of soft aimless jazz, pervasive elevator music the soundtrack to attenuated disappointment.

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Match ID: 46 Score: 10.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 0 days
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The town at the center of California’s climate refugee crisis
Sun, 22 May 2022 05:00:40 GMT

When the Camp fire raged through the Sierra Nevada foothills, it turned an existing housing crisis into a growing emergency

After Julia Cheek lost all of her belongings in the Camp fire, she longed for a safe place to lay her head at night. When she finally received a check from the California utility that had caused the fire, Cheek used it to buy the only home she could afford: a 2010 Nissan Xterra.

Cheek didn’t have insurance and has struggled to secure permanent housing since the fire, remaining among the growing population of unhoused residents in this northern California outpost.

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Apple display supplier could lose out on large iPhone 14 order after it was reportedly caught cutting corners
2022-05-22T04:42:01+00:00
Apple display supplier could lose out on large iPhone 14 order after it was reportedly caught cutting corners submitted by /u/Sorin61
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Carolyn Hax: Invitation without a plus-one threatens decades of family friendship
Sun, 22 May 2022 00:00:36 EDT
A mother "struggles to move on" after her daughter's invitation to a family wedding did not include a plus-one.
Match ID: 49 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 0 days
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Ask Amy: How do I support my trans son and hold on to my church?
Sun, 22 May 2022 00:00:00 EDT
Reader supports their son who is trans but worries about their church’s reaction.
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In Cuba, a frantic search for milk
Sat, 21 May 2022 21:00:20 EDT
As Cuba careens through its worst economic crisis in 30 years, the staple is one of the most potent symbols of the country’s precarious state.
Match ID: 51 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 0 days
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Biden signs $40 billion Ukraine aid bill
Sat, 21 May 2022 20:14:38 EDT
The aid package deepens the U.S. commitment to Ukraine amid signs of preparations for a longer conflict.
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Electric vehicle prices rise at Tesla, Rivian, GM and other carmakers
2022-05-21T23:07:06+00:00
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Sussmann prosecutors also take aim at Clinton, FBI and the news media
Sat, 21 May 2022 18:55:39 EDT
Testimony in the trial of lawyer Michael Sussmann shows how the FBI worried about being “played” in the wake of the 2016 probe of Hillary Clinton’s emails.
Match ID: 54 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 0 days
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Russia tries to rebound in Ukraine as prospects for victory fade
Sat, 21 May 2022 17:32:36 EDT
After the deaths of thousands of Russian soldiers and an avalanche of failures since the invasion of Ukraine began, President Vladimir Putin has narrowed his objectives in a campaign increasingly viewed as unsustainable, unrealistic — and likely unwinnable.
Match ID: 55 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 0 days
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‘Full investigation’ pledged of vast fines imposed by Social Security
Sat, 21 May 2022 17:28:08 EDT
Three House leaders with oversight of the Social Security Administration called on President Biden and acting commissioner Kilolo Kijakazi to investigate Inspector General Gail Ennis's administration of an anti-fraud program that levied massive fines on poor and elderly disabled people accused of wrongly receiving disability benefits.
Match ID: 56 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 0 days
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The weekend’s best deals: Epic PC games sale, 1Password subscriptions, and more
Sat, 21 May 2022 21:17:43 +0000
Dealmaster also has discounts on Hulu memberships, AirPods, and LG OLED TVs.
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qualifiers: 10.00 apple

Only in N.Y.: Upper West Side’s Nadler vs. Upper East Side’s Maloney
Sat, 21 May 2022 16:35:26 EDT
A court-ordered redistricting map has created a cross-town battle that has never happened: One House committee chair, Jerrold Nadler of New York's Upper West Side, is set to face off against Manhattan's other House committee chair, Carolyn B. Maloney of the Upper East Side.
Match ID: 58 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 0 days
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Russia bans 963 Americans, including Biden and Harris — but not Trump
Sat, 21 May 2022 15:47:31 EDT
The Russian Foreign Ministry's publication of a list of banned Americans is a largely symbolic move in response to U.S. support for Ukraine and historic sanctions on Russia.
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‘Stocky’ Edwards, Canadian flying ace in World War II, dies at 100
Sat, 21 May 2022 14:50:41 EDT
He was heralded his nation’s “top gun” over the North African desert in 1942 and 1943.
Match ID: 60 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 0 days
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Veering from Mad Max, George Miller debuts '3,000 Years'
Sat, 21 May 2022 14:35:09 EDT
It’s taken a lot of time and a good deal of yearning for Australian director George Miller to make “Three Thousand Years of Longing,” his long-awaited follow-up to “Mad Max: Fury Road.”
Match ID: 61 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 0 days
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House Democrats scramble after redistricting lessens competitive edge
Sat, 21 May 2022 14:13:19 EDT
Democrats became newly worried this month as favorable redistricting maps in Florida and New York were struck down and replaced with district lines that will likely make it even more difficult to keep their already slim majority in the House.
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China, U.S. are racing to make billions from mining the moon’s minerals
2022-05-21T16:05:10+00:00
China, U.S. are racing to make billions from mining the moon’s minerals submitted by /u/Sorin61
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Ethan Coen on his Jerry Lee Lewis doc and filmmaking return
Sat, 21 May 2022 11:54:20 EDT
Most in the film industry thought Ethan Coen was done with making movies
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Australia ousts conservative Prime Minister Scott Morrison
Sat, 21 May 2022 11:46:37 EDT
“Tonight the Australian people have voted for change,” Labor Party leader Anthony Albanese told supporters after the polls closed.
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EU Planning to Force Apple to Give Developers Access to All Hardware and Software Features
2022-05-21T15:00:33+00:00
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San Francisco archbishop bars Pelosi from communion over abortion stance
Sat, 21 May 2022 14:51:18 GMT

Ultra conservative Salvatore Cordileone accuses pro-choice House speaker of failing to ‘understand the grave evil she is perpetrating’

The Roman Catholic archbishop in Nancy Pelosi’s home town of San Francisco has banned her from receiving communion there over her staunch support of abortion rights, which she has strengthened as supreme court justices weigh finalizing a draft ruling outlawing the termination of pregnancies in more than half the county.

In a letter addressed to the US House speaker and posted on his Twitter account, ultra conservative Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone argued that Pelosi’s “position on abortion has become only more extreme over the years, especially in the last few months,” and he had decided to block her from communion after she had ignored his requests to explain her stance to him.

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Voting is surging in Georgia despite controversial new election law
Sat, 21 May 2022 10:16:55 EDT
Tuesday’s primary is the first big test of new election legislation, which was opposed by voting rights groups and Democrats.
Match ID: 68 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 0 days
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Make burger night better with recipes for patties, sauces and more
Sat, 21 May 2022 10:00:38 EDT
From buns to toppings and everything in between, these burger recipes will satisfy meat eaters and plant-based diners alike.
Match ID: 69 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 0 days
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In pictures: How the Mariupol siege unfolded
Sat, 21 May 2022 09:53:03 EDT
Here’s how Russia’s deadly siege of Ukraine's Mariupol took place, leaving much of the southeastern city in ruins.
Match ID: 70 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

On Venezuelan roads, old cars prevail, break down everywhere
Sat, 21 May 2022 09:46:49 EDT
Venezuela’s auto mechanics are increasingly busy these days, trying to coax a little more life out of aging vehicles
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Apocalypse now? The alarming effects of the global food crisis
Sat, 21 May 2022 13:25:20 GMT

The Bank of England governor warned last week of ‘apocalyptic’ food price rises. Yet war in Ukraine, climate change and inflation are already taking their toll all over the world

Apocalypse is an alarming idea, commonly taken to denote catastrophic destruction foreshadowing the end of the world. But in the original Greek, apokálypsis means a revelation or an uncovering. One vernacular definition is “to take the lid off something”.

That latter feat is exactly what Andrew Bailey, governor of the Bank of England, achieved last week, possibly inadvertently, when he suggested Britain was facing “apocalyptic” levels of food price inflation. Tory ministers fumed over what they saw as implied criticism of the government’s masterly economic management.

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‘Extremely active’ jumping worms that can leap a foot raise alarm in California
Sat, 21 May 2022 13:10:58 GMT

Earthworm native to east Asia and known for its large appetite poses threat to forest ecosystems, scientists say

An invasive worm species known for its “voracious appetite” and ability to jump a foot in the air is raising alarm in California, where scientists have expressed concerns about the threat the worms pose to forest ecosystems.

The Amynthas agrestis, also known as the Asian jumping worm, Alabama jumper or crazy snake worm, have been spotted in California in recent months. The earthworm is native to east Asia, particularly to Japan and the Korean peninsula. However, in recent years the worms made their way to North America via various landscape plants that have been imported from the region.

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Inside queer proms, where LGBTQ adults get a high school re-do
Sat, 21 May 2022 09:00:27 EDT
Many say these events offer them a safe and inclusive space to be themselves.
Match ID: 74 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

Apple’s Mixed-Reality Glasses Enter Our Actual Reality
Sat, 21 May 2022 13:00:00 +0000
Plus: Some beefier Qualcomm Snapdragon chips are on the way, and the right-to-repair movement hits a speed bump.
Match ID: 75 Score: 10.00 source: www.wired.com age: 0 days
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Labor Officials Find Amazon Threatened Pro-Union Workers With Wage Cuts
2022-05-21T12:57:43+00:00
Labor Officials Find Amazon Threatened Pro-Union Workers With Wage Cuts submitted by /u/psychothumbs
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Biden’s charm offensive seeks to bolster ties with South Korea, Indo-Pacific
Sat, 21 May 2022 07:12:22 EDT
Biden began engaging personally with Korea's president on the 10th day of his tenure, part of an effort to exert more influence in the region.
Match ID: 77 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 0 days
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Biden administration lays out plan for four carbon-capture facilities
Sat, 21 May 2022 11:00:27 +0000
Big infrastructure package includes funds for the underdeveloped technology.
Match ID: 78 Score: 10.00 source: arstechnica.com age: 0 days
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After Buffalo, Will Corporate America Turn Against the Murdochs and Fox News?
Sat, 21 May 2022 11:00:52 +0000

Why the Murdochs should become the next Sacklers.

The post After Buffalo, Will Corporate America Turn Against the Murdochs and Fox News? appeared first on The Intercept.


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The top 10 GOP presidential candidates for 2024, ranked
Sat, 21 May 2022 06:30:16 EDT
Pence edges up the list as he places a big Georgia bet against Trump — one that seems likely to pay off.
Match ID: 80 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 0 days
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German weather service says storm generated 3 tornadoes
Sat, 21 May 2022 06:08:17 EDT
Germany’s weather service says a storm that swept across parts of Germany generated three tornadoes
Match ID: 81 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 0 days
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The Black feminist activist who could be Colombia’s vice president
Sat, 21 May 2022 06:00:00 EDT
Francia Márquez, a political newcomer, is forcing Colombia to confront its racist, classist and sexist past and present.
Match ID: 82 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 0 days
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North Korea reports more fevers as Kim claims virus progress
Sat, 21 May 2022 03:50:43 EDT
North Korea says it has found nearly 220,000 more people with feverish symptoms, even as leader Kim Jong Un claims progress in slowing a largely undiagnosed spread of COVID-19 across an unvaccinated population of 26 million
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Tesla Asking Owners to Limit Charging During Texas Heatwave Isn’t a Good Sign
2022-05-21T05:06:53+00:00
Tesla Asking Owners to Limit Charging During Texas Heatwave Isn’t a Good Sign submitted by /u/Cascading_Neurons
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Could this tough-on-crime billionaire be LA’s next mayor?
Sat, 21 May 2022 05:00:11 GMT

Rick Caruso’s campaign is tapping into fears of rising crime and Angelenos’ frustration with the homelessness emergency

A billionaire real estate developer has spent more than $23m on his campaign to become Los Angeles’s next tough-on-crime mayor, and experts say his record-breaking investment is buying him a real chance at victory.

Rick Caruso, a real estate magnate who is ranked No 261 on Forbes’ list of richest Americans, entered the crowded race to run America’s second largest city in February with single-digit support and little name recognition.

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'Armageddon Time,' portrait of white privilege, stirs Cannes
Sat, 21 May 2022 00:08:06 EDT
James Gray’s autobiographical coming of age film “Armageddon Time,” starring Anthony Hopkins, Anne Hathaway and Jeremy Strong, has made the biggest splash of an American film not starring Tom Cruise at the Cannes Film Festival
Match ID: 86 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
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Miss Manners: I didn’t wait for everyone to be served before eating
Sat, 21 May 2022 00:00:00 EDT
Reader didn’t think they had to wait for everyone to have an appetizer before they started eating.
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Carolyn Hax: Friend’s young adult kids are always tagging along
Sat, 21 May 2022 00:00:26 EDT
One friend seeks a diplomatic way to approach another whose kids "always, I mean always," tag along at every social event.
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Ask Amy: I’m not in love with my partner but don’t want to break his heart
Sat, 21 May 2022 00:00:00 EDT
Reader is in a 20-year relationship with a man but has always been attracted to women and wants to explore that.
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Russia says it has full control of Mariupol steel plant
Fri, 20 May 2022 20:40:20 EDT
Meantime, Russia plans to cut off Finland from natural gas and the war crimes trial of Russian solider Vadim Shishimarin will resume next week in Ukraine.
Match ID: 90 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

Post Politics Now: No near end in sight for Pa. GOP Senate primary
Fri, 20 May 2022 20:08:56 EDT
President Biden was in South Korea on Friday in the first visit to Asia of his presidency, kicking off a five-day tour designed to underscore his administration’s commitment to the region in the face of a rising China.
Match ID: 91 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

India’s wheat farmers count cost of 40C heat that evokes ‘deserts of Rajasthan’
Sat, 21 May 2022 00:00:04 GMT

The ban on wheat exports highlights the effect a rapidly warming planet has on food security – and livelihoods

It was his buffaloes that he was first worried about. As temperatures in the small village of Baras, deep in the Indian state of Punjab, began to soar to unseasonably hot levels in April, farmer Hardeep Singh Uppal noticed that his two buffaloes, essential for his family’s livelihood, became feverish and unwell.

A few weeks later and the buffaloes now seem fine, flicking their tails leisurely as an icy breeze blows down from an air conditioning unit, a luxury that once sat in Uppal’s parents house but now has been installed in an otherwise run-down cowshed, running all day at great expense. “The vet told me I need to keep them cool in this heatwave otherwise they will die so this is the only way,” said Uppal.

Continue reading...
Match ID: 92 Score: 10.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 development

As the defense of Mariupol ends, fighting in eastern Ukraine rages on
Fri, 20 May 2022 18:56:35 EDT
A leader of the far-right Azov Regiment says an order has been issued to cease in their last-ditch defense of Mariupol, which has been gutted by the Russian military.
Match ID: 93 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

How a Social Security program piled huge fines on the poor and disabled
Fri, 20 May 2022 18:48:21 EDT
The remarkable penalties led to tumult inside the office of Inspector General Gail Ennis, where a whistleblower was targeted for retaliation, an administrative judge ruled.
Match ID: 94 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

San Francisco archbishop denying Pelosi Communion over abortion rights
Fri, 20 May 2022 18:18:28 EDT
The edict from Salvatore J. Cordileone, the Catholic Church archbishop in San Francisco, represents an extraordinary rebuke of Pelosi’s Roman Catholic faith.
Match ID: 95 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

Biden kicks off Asia trip lauding tech cooperation with South Korea
Fri, 20 May 2022 18:02:09 EDT
President Biden's five-day trip to South Korea and Japan is meant to emphasize U.S. commitment to the region in the face of a more assertive China.
Match ID: 96 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

Pennsylvania GOP Senate race is likely headed to a recount
Fri, 20 May 2022 17:33:02 EDT
The Associated Press said the race was too close to call.
Match ID: 97 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

Democrats have a few more weeks to enact their agenda
Fri, 20 May 2022 17:30:31 EDT
Summer and election season tend to be unproductive.
Match ID: 98 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

Roger Angell, editor, baseball writer at the New Yorker, dies at 101
Fri, 20 May 2022 17:24:22 EDT
As fiction editor, he helped mold the stories of generations of writers. As a sportswriter, he was enshrined in the writers’ wing of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.
Match ID: 99 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

What rights do prisoners of war have under international law?
Fri, 20 May 2022 17:14:54 EDT
The Geneva Conventions lay out rules for the treatment of captured fighters. Here's what to know.
Match ID: 100 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

Biden security officials sent home after incident in South Korea
Fri, 20 May 2022 16:53:23 EDT
A member of President Biden’s security personnel has been accused of assaulting a South Korean in Seoul one day before Biden's trip to the country, according to South Korean police.
Match ID: 101 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

Breaking down claims about congresspeople and pre-Jan. 6 Capitol tours
Fri, 20 May 2022 16:31:18 EDT
Some Democrats claimed early that these were akin to "reconnaissance" tours. Here's where the Rep. Barry Loudermilk (R-Ga.) revelation fits.
Match ID: 102 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

Review: New Chip ‘N Dale movie hilariously spoofs classic games, cartoons
Fri, 20 May 2022 19:45:11 +0000
A Shrek for a new era, as Disney lets Lonely Island go nuts (in PG fashion).
Match ID: 103 Score: 10.00 source: arstechnica.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 development

A second Apple Store union election will take place next month
2022-05-20T19:40:11+00:00
A second Apple Store union election will take place next month submitted by /u/Sorin61
[link] [comments]

Match ID: 104 Score: 10.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 apple

The Thomases have diverging views on accepting undesired outcomes
Fri, 20 May 2022 14:46:37 EDT
It's hard not to see new reports about Ginni Thomas's efforts to subvert the 2020 election outside of Clarence Thomas's recent chiding about Roe v. Wade.
Match ID: 105 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

5 problems behind the global cost-of-living crisis
Fri, 20 May 2022 14:26:39 EDT
In some countries, distinct factors are in play, such as Brexit and tax hikes in Britain. But a range of problems that cut across borders are driving inflation globally.
Match ID: 106 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

Couples share the abortion decisions that shaped their lives
Fri, 20 May 2022 13:33:07 EDT
Four couples told The Washington Post about making that choice — to abort or not — and how it affected them.
Match ID: 107 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

Meet the man who has eaten a Big Mac a day for 50 years
Fri, 20 May 2022 13:28:33 EDT
Big Mac superfan Don Gorske of Fond du Lac, Wis., has missed only a few days in the past half-century.
Match ID: 108 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

The Pentagon congratulates the New York Times for doing its work
Fri, 20 May 2022 13:26:17 EDT
The Pentagon's spokesman credited the Times with a punishing series exposing Defense Department missteps. Is there a precedent for such an acknowledgment?
Match ID: 109 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

How redistricting is shaping the 2022 U.S. House map
Fri, 20 May 2022 13:17:02 EDT
The Post is analyzing the 2022 U.S. House map in this redistricting tracker as states finalize their congressional boundaries for the next decade. Republicans and Democrats are going to great lengths to tip districts in their favor and accusations of gerrymandering and lawsuits have followed.
Match ID: 110 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

New USB-C dock triples M1 Mac external monitor support, Anker says
Fri, 20 May 2022 17:12:17 +0000
Limiting 4K to 30 Hz will be a deal-breaker for some.
Match ID: 111 Score: 10.00 source: arstechnica.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 apple

Former German chancellor Schröder resigns from Russian energy firm
Fri, 20 May 2022 12:36:25 EDT
German lawmakers had stripped Gerhard Schröder of his office and staff Thursday and called for him to resign from Rosneft.
Match ID: 112 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

European countries confirm more than 70 monkeypox cases
Fri, 20 May 2022 10:54:17 EDT
Cases have been reported in North America and Australia, too.
Match ID: 113 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

Tracking coronavirus in animals takes on new urgency
Fri, 20 May 2022 10:53:56 EDT
Inside a global hunt to identify and stop mutations that might lead to more lethal variants.
Match ID: 114 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

Track team was suspended for sports bras at practice. They fought back.
Fri, 20 May 2022 10:44:15 EDT
A disagreement over sports bras between the Albany High School girls’ track team and the school district’s athletic director sparked a protest, a flurry of suspensions and accusations from the student-athletes of “blatant” discrimination.
Match ID: 115 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

In Lyon’s network of hidden passageways, footfalls of the past
Fri, 20 May 2022 10:00:19 EDT
Books and movies have added to the mystique of the “traboules,” or hidden passageways, that wind through Lyon.
Match ID: 116 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

How to peel and devein shrimp — a visual guide
Fri, 20 May 2022 10:00:10 EDT
Peeling and deveining shrimp yourself is simple and can save you money. This video tutorial will show you how.
Match ID: 117 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

New Heights, a longtime favorite, undergoes a delicious reinvention
Fri, 20 May 2022 08:00:16 EDT
New Heights reopens with new owners, a new look and some fantastic new dishes.
Match ID: 118 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

Explaining water pillows and three other specialty headrests
Fri, 20 May 2022 08:00:54 EDT
Specialty pillows such as water, cervical, buckwheat and wedge help with different sleep problems.
Match ID: 119 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

A rock shattered our windshield in Jordan. It became a trip highlight.
Fri, 20 May 2022 08:00:21 EDT
A thrown rock is an unexpected introduction to village culture on a road trip through rural Jordan.
Match ID: 120 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

Bluetooth Flaw Allows Remote Unlocking of Digital Locks
2022-05-20T11:02:14Z

Locks that use Bluetooth Low Energy to authenticate keys are vulnerable to remote unlocking. The research focused on Teslas, but the exploit is generalizable.

In a video shared with Reuters, NCC Group researcher Sultan Qasim Khan was able to open and then drive a Tesla using a small relay device attached to a laptop which bridged a large gap between the Tesla and the Tesla owner’s phone.

“This proves that any product relying on a trusted BLE connection is vulnerable to attacks even from the other side of the world,” the UK-based firm said in a statement, referring to the Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) protocol—technology used in millions of cars and smart locks which automatically open when in close proximity to an authorised device...


Match ID: 121 Score: 10.00 source: www.schneier.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 tesla

Rocket Report: Starliner soars into orbit; about those Raptor RUDs in Texas
Fri, 20 May 2022 11:00:51 +0000
"From the outside, it might look like an ordinary rocket."
Match ID: 122 Score: 10.00 source: arstechnica.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 california

A generation of LGBTQ advocates hopes the clock isn’t ticking backward
Fri, 20 May 2022 07:00:25 EDT
They hoped the long battle for mainstream acceptance was nearing an end. Then came the so-called “Don’t Say Gay” bills and the “groomer” rhetoric.
Match ID: 123 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

Who is your work Joe Manchin?
Fri, 20 May 2022 06:00:53 EDT
Joe Manchin keeps blocking President Biden's agenda. What can he teach us about our own work nemesis?
Match ID: 124 Score: 10.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

Under the volcano: a year after Mount Nyiragongo’s eruption, people of Goma start to rebuild their lives
Fri, 20 May 2022 09:00:46 GMT

Mount Nyiragongo, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, erupted in May last year. More than 360,000 people were displaced from around Goma but the aid has dried up and now they must largely fend for themselves

Continue reading...
Match ID: 125 Score: 10.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 10.00 development

Facebook parent company Meta Platforms has plans to monetize WhatsApp
Thu, 19 May 2022 19:00:30 GMT

Facebook parent company Meta Platforms Inc. is adding commercial services to WhatsApp so businesses can build a custom dashboard to chat with customers and offer customer services. On Thursday, company CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced in a Facebook post the introduction of WhatsApp Cloud API, a cloud-based version of the WhatsApp Business API. The service is the latest technology iteration in a years-long push to monetize the otherwise free messaging app as Meta explores revenue streams outside of advertising. Additionally, the company is venturing into the metaverse to boost sales.

Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news.


Match ID: 126 Score: 10.00 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 10.00 whatsapp

How we learned to break down barriers to machine learning
Thu, 19 May 2022 16:12:08 +0000
Dr. Nashlie Sephus schools us on how to get ML on your IT team's radar.
Match ID: 127 Score: 10.00 source: arstechnica.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 10.00 amazon

Canopy Growth agrees to buy California vape company Jetty Extracts if U.S. goes legal
Thu, 19 May 2022 15:04:15 GMT

Canopy Growth Corp. said Wednesday it agreed on two call options to acquire control of California-based Lemurian Inc., which does business under the name Jetty Extracts. The two companies will continue to operate independently until Canopy exercises its acquisition rights for the cannabis vape technology and extracts company. Canopy Growth pay about $69 million in cash and common shares in exchange for roughly 75% of the equity interests in Jetty, subject to adjustments. Upon exercise of the rights to acquire up to 100% of the equity interests in Jetty covered by the first option agreement, Canopy Growth will make an additional payment. Canopy Growth did not disclose the dollar amount of the second payment. Canopy Growth said it's the latest U.S. company to ink a deal upon U.S. legalization after its $3 billion acquisition plan for Acreage in 2019 and Wana Brands for $298 million in late 2021. Canopy Growth also holds a significant conditional ownership interest in TerrAscend Corp. . Canopy Growth shares are down 32.3% in 2022 compared to a drop of 45.5% by the AdvisorShares Pure US Cannabis ETF .

Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news.


Match ID: 128 Score: 10.00 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 10.00 california

‘Huge spike’ in global conflict caused record number of displacements in 2021
Thu, 19 May 2022 06:00:12 GMT

Those fleeing combat were internally displaced 14.4m times, with biggest toll in sub-Saharan Africa, report reveals

Conflict and violence forced people from their homes a record number of times last year, a report has found, with sub-Saharan Africa bearing the brunt of mass internal displacement caused by “huge spikes” in fighting.

People fleeing violence were internally displaced 14.4m times in 2021, an increase of 4.6m on 2020, according to figures published by the Norwegian Refugee Council’s Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC).

Continue reading...
Match ID: 129 Score: 10.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 10.00 development

‘History repeating’: Amazon base in Cape Town splits Indigenous groups
Thu, 19 May 2022 04:00:08 GMT

Building work is quiet, for now, on £200m project that pits different visions of South Africa’s future against one another

Smoke curls into the air, a drum beats, the dance begins, a chant is raised. Ten metres away, cars howl past on a busy road, drivers unaware of the sacred ritual taking place in the centre of a bustling South African city.

Francisco Mackenzie, a chief of the Cochoqua community of the Khoi people, talks of ancient beliefs and battles five centuries ago, against invaders from overseas. He points to the iconic skyline of Table Mountain, and then to a nearby building site.

Continue reading...
Match ID: 130 Score: 8.57 source: www.theguardian.com age: 3 days
qualifiers: 8.57 amazon

14 Essentials You Need in a Car Emergency Kit
Wed, 18 May 2022 13:00:00 +0000
Whether you’re heading out for a road trip or just commuting around town, don’t leave home without the basics.
Match ID: 131 Score: 8.57 source: www.wired.com age: 3 days
qualifiers: 8.57 amazon

An EU Law Could Let US Prosecutors Scan Phones for Abortion Texts
Wed, 18 May 2022 12:00:00 +0000
Tools used to find child abuse material could be wielded in the US to protect “unborn children” if the EU bans end-to-end encryption.
Match ID: 132 Score: 8.57 source: www.wired.com age: 3 days
qualifiers: 8.57 apple

iPhone Malware that Operates Even When the Phone Is Turned Off
2022-05-18T11:06:16Z

Researchers have demonstrated iPhone malware that works even when the phone is fully shut down.

t turns out that the iPhone’s Bluetooth chip­—which is key to making features like Find My work­—has no mechanism for digitally signing or even encrypting the firmware it runs. Academics at Germany’s Technical University of Darmstadt figured out how to exploit this lack of hardening to run malicious firmware that allows the attacker to track the phone’s location or run new features when the device is turned off.

[…]

The research is the first—or at least among the first—to study the risk posed by chips running in low-power mode. Not to be confused with iOS’s low-power mode for conserving battery life, the low-power mode (LPM) in this research allows chips responsible for near-field communication, ultra wideband, and Bluetooth to run in a special mode that can remain on for 24 hours after a device is turned off...


Match ID: 133 Score: 8.57 source: www.schneier.com age: 3 days
qualifiers: 8.57 apple

A Turf War on the Water in “Anchored Out”
Wed, 18 May 2022 10:00:00 +0000
A new documentary captures a wealthy Bay Area county’s efforts to evict a ragtag community of boat dwellers.
Match ID: 134 Score: 8.57 source: www.newyorker.com age: 3 days
qualifiers: 8.57 california

Democratic Voters Deliver Stinging Rebuke to Party's Manchin-Sinema Wing
Wed, 18 May 2022 06:13:11 +0000

Voters shrugged off an obscene amount of spending from super PACs to send a message to Democrats: Do something.

The post Democratic Voters Deliver Stinging Rebuke to Party’s Manchin-Sinema Wing appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 135 Score: 8.57 source: theintercept.com age: 3 days
qualifiers: 8.57 apple

Companies Vie to Build NASA’s Next Communications Network
Fri, 13 May 2022 15:28:16 +0000


It was a great idea for its time—a network of NASA communications satellites high in geostationary orbit, providing nearly continuous radio contact between controllers on the ground and some of the agency’s highest-profile missions: the space shuttles, the International Space Station, the Hubble Space Telescope, and dozens of others.

The satellites were called TDRS—short for Tracking and Data Relay Satellite—and the first was launched in 1983 on the maiden voyage of the space shuttle Challenger. Twelve more would follow, quietly providing a backbone for NASA’s orbital operations. But they’ve gotten old, they’re expensive, and in the 40 years since they began, they’ve been outpaced by commercial satellite networks.

So what comes next? That’s the 278-million-dollar question—but, importantly, it’s not a multibillion-dollar question.

“Now it’ll be just plug and play. They can concentrate on the mission, and they don’t have to worry about comms, because we provide that for them.”
—Craig Miller, Viasat

NASA, following its mantra to get out of the business of routine space operations, has now awarded US $278.5 million in contracts to six companies: Amazon’s Project Kuiper, Inmarsat Government, SES Government Solutions, SpaceX, Telesat, and Viasat. The agency is asking them to offer services that are reliable, adaptable for all sorts of missions, easy for NASA to use, and—ideally—orders of magnitude less expensive than TDRS.

“It’s an ambitious wish list,” says Eli Naffah, communications services project manager at NASA’s Glenn Research Center, in Cleveland. “We’re looking to have industry tell us, based on their capabilities and their business interests, what they would like to provide to us as a service that they would provide to others broadly.”

A satellite  and Earth. Inmarsat now operates a number of geostationary satellites in their GX fleet. The projected GX7 satellite [left] is expected to launch in 2023.Inmarsat Government

Satellite communication is one area that has taken off as a business proposition, independent of NASA’s space efforts. Internet and television transmission, GPS, phone service—all of these have become giant enterprises, ubiquitous in people’s lives. Economy of scale and competition have brought prices down dramatically. (That’s very different from, say, space tourism, which attracts a lot of attention but for now is still something that only the very wealthy can afford.)

NASA benefits, in the case of communications, from being a relatively small player, especially if it can get out from under the costs of running something like the TDRS system. The commercial satellite companies take over those costs—which, they say, is fine, since they were spending the money anyway.

“We love having customers like NASA,” says Craig Miller, president for government systems at Viasat. “They’re a joy to work with, their mission is in alignment with a lot of our core values, but we make billions of dollars a year selling Internet to other sources.”

Each of the six companies under the new NASA contract takes a different approach. Inmarsat, SES, and Viasat, for instance, would use large relay satellites, like TDRS, each seeming to hover over a fixed spot on Earth’s equator because, at an altitude of 35,786 kilometers, one orbit takes precisely 24 hours. Amazon and SpaceX, by contrast, would use swarms of smaller satellites in low Earth orbit, only 3,700 km in altitude. (SpaceX, at last count, had launched more than 2,200 of its Starlink satellites.) SES and Telesat would offer two-for-one packages, with service both from high and lower orbits. As for radio frequencies, the companies might use C band, Ka band, L band, optical—whatever their existing clients have needed. And so on.

Two rows of stacked objects seen over the background of Earth. Sixty SpaceX Starlink satellites wait for deployment from their launch rocket in low Earth orbit, in this photograph from 2019.SpaceX

It may sound like an alphabet soup of ways to solve one basic need—being in contact with its satellites—but engineers say that’s a minor trade-off for NASA if it can piggyback on others’ communications networks. “This allows NASA and our other government users to achieve their missions without the upfront capital expenditure and the full life-cycle cost” of running the TDRS system, said Britt Lewis, a senior vice president of Inmarsat Government, in an email to IEEE Spectrum.

One major advantage to the space agency would be the sheer volume of service available to it. In years past, the TDRS system could handle only so many transmissions at a time; if a particular mission needed to send a large volume of data, it had to book time in advance.

“Now it’ll be just plug and play,” says Miller at Viasat. “They can concentrate on the mission, and they don’t have to worry about comms, because we provide that for them.”

NASA says it expects each company will complete technology development and in-space demonstrations by 2025, with the most successful starting to take over operations for the agency by 2030. There will probably be no single winner: “We’re not really looking to have any one particular company be able to provide all the services on our list,” says NASA’s Naffah.

picture of a satellite in earth orbit NASA's TDRS-M communications satellite launched in 2017. NASA

The TDRS satellites have proved durable; TDRS-3, launched by the space shuttle Discovery in 1988, is still usable as a spare if newer satellites break down. NASA says it will probably continue to use the system into the 2030s, but it planned no more launches after the last (of TDRS-13 a.k.a. TDRS-M) in 2017.

If everything works out, says Amazon in an email, “This model would allow organizations like NASA to rely on commercial operators for near-Earth communications while shifting their focus to more ambitious operations, like solving technical challenges for deep space exploration and science missions.”

At which point the sky's the limit. NASA focuses on the moon, Mars, and other exploration, while it buys routine services from the private sector.

“We can provide the same kind of broadband capabilities that you’re used to having on Earth,” says Viasat’s Miller. He smiles at this thought. “We can provide Netflix to the ISS.”


Match ID: 136 Score: 8.57 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 8 days
qualifiers: 3.57 trade, 2.14 musk, 1.43 development, 1.43 amazon

Meta’s Challenge to OpenAI—Give Away a Massive Language Model
Thu, 05 May 2022 21:23:38 +0000


Meta is giving away some of the family jewels: That’s the gist of an announcement from the company formerly known as Facebook this week. In a blog post on the Meta AI site, the company’s researchers announced that they’ve created a massive and powerful language AI system and are making it available free to all researchers in the artificial-intelligence community. Meta describes the move as an effort to democratize access to a powerful kind of AI—but some argue that not very many researchers will actually benefit from this largesse. And even as these models become more accessible to researchers, many questions remain about the path to commercial use.

Large language models are one of the hottest things in AI right now. Models like OpenAI’s GPT-3 can generate remarkably fluid and coherent text in just about any format or style: They can write convincing news articles, legal summaries, poems, and advertising copy, or hold up their end of conversation as customer-service chatbots or video-game characters. GPT-3, which broke the mold with its 175 billion parameters, is available to academic and commercial entities only via OpenAI’s application and vetting process.

Meta’s Open Pretrained Transformer (known as OPT-175B) matches GPT-3 with 175 billion parameters of its own. Meta is offering the research community not only the model itself, but also its codebase and extensive notes and logbooks about the training process. The model was trained on 800 gigabytes of data from five publicly available data sets, which are described in the “data card” that accompanies a technical paper posted by the Meta researchers to the ArXiv online preprint server.

Joelle Pineau, director of Meta AI Research Labs, tells IEEE Spectrum that she expects researchers to make use of this treasure trove in several ways. “The first thing I expect [researchers] to do is to use it to build other types of language-based systems, whether it’s machine translation, a chatbot, something that completes text—all of these require this kind of state-of-the-art language model,” she says. Rather than training their own language models from scratch, Pineau says, they can build applications and run them “on a relatively modest compute budget.”

A smiling woman with short dark hair Joelle PineauMeta

The second thing she expects researchers to do, Pineau says, is “pull it apart” to examine its flaws and limitations. Large language models like GPT-3 are famously capable of generating toxic language full of stereotypes and harmful bias; that troubling tendency is a result of training data that includes hateful language found in Reddit forums and the like. In their technical paper, Meta’s researchers describe how they evaluated the model on benchmarks related to hate speech, stereotypes, and toxic-content generation, but Pineau says “there’s so much more to be done.” She adds that the scrutiny should be done “by community researchers, not inside closed research labs.”

The paper states that “we still believe this technology is premature for commercial deployment,” and says that by releasing the model with a noncommercial license, Meta hopes to facilitate the development of guidelines for responsible use of large language models “before broader commercial deployment occurs.”

Within Meta, Pineau acknowledges that there’s a lot of interest in using OPT-175B commercially. “We have a lot of groups that deal with text,” she notes, that might want to build a specialized application on top of the language model. It’s easy to imagine product teams salivating over the technology: It could power content-moderation tools or text translation, could help suggest relevant content, or could generate text for the creatures of the metaverse, should it truly come to pass.

There have been other efforts to make an open-source language model, most notably from EleutherAI, an association that has released a 20-billion-parameter model in February. Connor Leahy, one of the founders of EleutherAI and founder of an AI startup called Conjecture, calls Meta’s move a good step for open science. “Especially the release of their logbook is unprecedented (to my knowledge) and very welcome,” he tells Spectrum in an email. But he notes that Meta’s conditional release, making the model available only on request and with a noncommercial license, “falls short of truly open.” EleutherAI doesn’t comment on its plans, but Leahy says the group will continue working on its own language AI, and adds that OPT-175B will be helpful for some of its research. “Open research is synergistic in that way,” he says.

“Security through obscurity is not security, as the saying in the computer-security world goes. And studying these models and finding ways to integrate their existence into our world is the only feasible path forward.”
—Connor Leahy, EleutherAI

EleutherAI is a something of an outlier in AI research in that it’s a self-organizing group of volunteers. Much of today’s cutting-edge AI work is done within the R&D departments of big players like Meta, Google, OpenAI, Microsoft, Nvidia, and other deep-pocketed companies. That’s because it takes enormous amount of energy and compute infrastructure to train big AI systems.

Meta claims that its training of OPT-175 required 1/7th the carbon footprint of that required for training GPT-3, yet as Meta’s paper notes, that’s still a significant energy expenditure. The paper says that OPT-175B was trained on 992 80-gigabyte A100 GPUs from Nvidia, with a carbon-emissions footprint of 75 tons, as compared to an estimated carbon budget of 500 tons for GPT-3 (that figure has not been confirmed by OpenAI).

Meta’s hope is that by offering up this “foundation model” for other entities to build on top of, it will at least reduce the need to build huge models from scratch. Deploying the model, Meta says in its blog post, requires only 16 Nvidia 32GB V100 GPUs. The company is also releasing smaller scale versions of OPT-175B that can be used by researchers who don’t need the full-scale model or by those who are investigating the behavior of language models at different scales.

Maarten Sap, a researcher at the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence (AI2) and in incoming assistant professor at Carnegie Mellon University’s Language Technologies Institute, studies large language models and has worked on methods to detoxify them. In other words, he’s exactly the kind of researcher that Meta is hoping to attract. Sap says that he’d “love to use OPT-175B,” but “the biggest issue is that few research labs actually have the infrastructure to run this model.” If it were easier to run, he says, he’d use it to study toxic language risks and social intelligence within language models.

While Sap applauds Meta for opening up the model to the community, he thinks it could go a step further. “Ideally, having a demo of the system and an API with much more control/access than [OpenAI’s API for GPT-3] would be great for actual accessibility,” he says. However, he notes that Meta’s release of smaller versions is a good “second-best option.”

Whether models like OPT-175B will ever become as safe and accessible as other kinds of enterprise software is still an open question, and there are different ideas about the path forward. EleutherAI’s Leahy says that preventing broad commercial use of these models won’t solve the problems with them. “Security through obscurity is not security, as the saying in the computer-security world goes,” says Leahy, “and studying these models and finding ways to integrate their existence into our world is the only feasible path forward.”

Meanwhile, Sap argues that AI regulation is needed to “prevent researchers, people, or companies from using AI to impersonate people, generate propaganda or fake news, or other harms.” But he notes that “it’s pretty clear that Meta is against regulation in many ways.”

Sameer Singh, an associate professor at University of California, Irvine, and a research fellow at AI2 who works on language models, praises Meta for releasing the training notes and logbooks, saying that process information may end up being more useful to researchers than the model itself. Singh says he hopes that such openness will become the norm. He also says he supports providing commercial access to at least smaller models, since such access can be useful for understanding models’ practical limitations.

“Disallowing commercial access completely or putting it behind a paywall may be the only way to justify, from a business perspective, why these companies should build and release LLMs in the first place,” Singh says. “I suspect these restrictions have less to do with potential damage than claimed.”


Match ID: 137 Score: 8.57 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 16 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google, 1.43 microsoft, 1.43 development, 1.43 california, 0.71 startup

EVTOL Companies Are Worth Billions—Who Are the Key Players?
Tue, 22 Feb 2022 21:16:10 +0000


“Hardware is hard,” venture capitalist Marc Andreessen famously declared at a tech investors’ event in 2013. Explaining the longstanding preference for software startups among VCs, Andreessen said, “There are so many more things that can go wrong in a hardware company. There are so many more ways a hardware company can blow up in a nonrecoverable way.”

Even as Andreessen was speaking, however, the seeds were being sown for one of the biggest and most sustained infusions of cash into a hardware-based movement in the last decade. Since then, the design and construction of electric vertical-takeoff-and-landing (eVTOL) aircraft has been propelled by waves of funding from some of the biggest names in tech. And, surprisingly for such a large movement, the funding is mostly coming from sources outside of the traditional venture-capital community—rich investors and multinational corporations. The list includes Google cofounder Larry Page, autonomy pioneer Sebastian Thrun, entrepreneur Martine Rothblatt, LinkedIn cofounder Reid Hoffman, Zynga founder Mark Pincus, investor Adam Grosser, entrepreneur Marc Lore, and companies including Uber, Mercedes-Benz, Airbus, Boeing, Toyota, Hyundai, Honda, JetBlue, American Airlines, Virgin Atlantic, and many more.

Today, some 250 companies are working toward what they hope will be a revolution in urban transportation. Some, such as Wisk and Kittyhawk and Joby, are flying a small fleet of prototype aircraft; others have nothing more than a design concept. If the vision becomes reality, hundreds of eVTOLs will swarm over the skies of a big city during a typical rush hour, whisking small numbers of passengers at per-kilometer costs no greater than those of driving a car. This vision, which goes by the name urban air mobility or advanced air mobility, will require backers to overcome entire categories of obstacles, including certification, technology development, and the operational considerations of safely flying large numbers of aircraft in a small airspace.

Even tech development, considered the most straightforward of the challenges, has a way to go. Joby, one of the most advanced of the startups, provided a stark reminder of this fact when it was disclosed on 16 February that one of its unpiloted prototypes crashed during a test flight in a remote part of California. Few details were available, but reporting by FutureFlight suggested the aircraft was flying test routes at altitudes up to 1,200 feet and at speeds as high as 240 knots.

No one expects the urban air mobility market, if it does get off the ground, to ever be large enough to accommodate 250 manufacturers of eVTOLs, so a cottage industry has sprung up around handicapping the field. SMG Consulting (founded by Sergio Cecutta, a former executive at Honeywell and Danaher) has been ranking eVTOL startups in its Advanced Air Mobility Reality Index since December 2020. Its latest index—from which our chart below has been adapted, with SMG’s kind permission—suggests that the top 10 startups have pulled in more than US $6 billion in funding; the next couple of hundred startups have combined funding in the several hundred million at most.

Cecutta is quick to point out that funding, though important, is not everything when it comes to ranking the eVTOL companies. How they will navigate the largely uncharted territory of certifying and manufacturing the novel fliers will also be critical. “These companies are all forecasting production in the hundreds, if not thousands” of units per year, he says.

“The aerospace industry is not used to producing in those kinds of numbers….The challenge is to be able to build at that rate, to have a supply chain that can supply you with the components you need to build at that rate. Aerospace is a team sport. There is no company that does 100 percent in-house.” Hardware really is hard.

This article appears in the March 2022 print issue as “What’s Behind the Air-Taxi Craze”; on 24 Feb. 2022, the chart was updated with data kindly provided by Beta Technologies.


Match ID: 138 Score: 8.57 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 88 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google, 1.43 development, 1.43 california, 0.71 uber, 0.71 startup, 0.71 start-up

Canva Review 2022: Details, Pricing & Features
Sun, 20 Feb 2022 12:02:00 +0000


Are you looking for a new graphic design tool? Would you like to read a detailed review of Canva? As it's one of the tools I love using. I am also writing my first ebook using canva and publish it soon on my site you can download it is free.  Let's start the review.

Canva has a web version and also a mobile app

What is Canva?

Canva is a free graphic design web application that allows you to create invitations, business cards, flyers, lesson plans, banners, and more using professionally designed templates. You can upload your own photos from your computer or from Google Drive, and add them to Canva's templates using a simple drag-and-drop interface. It's like having a basic version of Photoshop that doesn't require Graphic designing knowledge to use. It’s best for nongraphic designers.

Who is Canva best suited for?

Canva is a great tool for small business owners, online entrepreneurs, and marketers who don’t have the time and want to edit quickly.

To create sophisticated graphics, a tool such as Photoshop can is ideal. To use it, you’ll need to learn its hundreds of features, get familiar with the software, and it’s best to have a good background in design, too.

Also running the latest version of Photoshop you need a high-end computer.

So here  Canva takes place, with Canva you can do all that with drag-and-drop feature. It’s also easier to use and free. Also an even-more-affordable paid version is available for $12.95 per month.

Free vs Pro vs Enterprise Pricing plan

The product is available in three plans: Free, Pro ($12.99/month per user or  $119.99/year for up to 5 people), and Enterprise ($30 per user per month, minimum 25 people).

Free plan Features

  • 250,000+ free templates
  • 100+ design types (social media posts, presentations, letters, and more)
  • Hundreds of thousands of free photos and graphics
  • Invite members to your team
  • Collaborate and comment in real-time
  • 5GB of cloud storage
  • Try Canva Pro for free for 30 days

Pro Plan Features 

  • Everything Free, has plus:
  • 100+ million premium and  stock photos, videos, audio, and graphics
  • 610,000+ premium and free templates with new designs daily
  • Access to Background Remover and Magic Resize
  •  Create a library of your brand or campaign's colors, logos, and fonts with up to 100 Brand Kits
  • Remove image backgrounds instantly with background remover
  • Resize designs infinitely with Magic Resize
  • Save designs as templates for your team to use
  • 100GB of cloud storage
  • Schedule social media content to 8 platforms

Enterprise Plan Features

  • Everything Pro has plus:
  • Establish your brand's visual identity with logos, colors and fonts across multiple Brand Kits
  • Control your team's access to apps, graphics, logos, colors and fonts with brand controls
  • Built-in workflows to get approval on your designs
  • Set which elements your team can edit and stay on brand with template locking
  • Unlimited Storage
  • Log in with single-sign on (SSO) and have access to 24/7 Enterprise-level support.

How to Use Canva?

To get started on Canva, you will need to create an account by providing your email address, Google, Facebook or Apple credentials. You will then choose your account type between student, teacher, small business, large company, non-profit, or personal. Based on your choice of account type, templates will be recommended to you.

You can sign up for a free trial of Canva Pro, or you can start with the free version to get a sense of whether it’s the right graphic design tool for your needs.

Canva Sign Up

Designing with Canva

canva


When you sign up for an account, Canva will suggest different post types to choose from. Based on the type of account you set up  you'll be able to see templates categorized by the following categories: social media posts, documents, presentations, marketing, events, ads, launch your business, build your online brand, etc.

 Start by choosing a template for your post or searching for something more specific. Search by social network name to see a list of post types on each network.

Templates

canva templates


Next, you can choose a template. Choose from hundreds of templates that are ready to go, with customizable photos, text, and other elements.

You can start your design by choosing from a variety of ready-made templates, searching for a template matching your needs, or working with a blank template.


 Canva has a lot to choose from, so start with a specific search.if you want to create business card just search for it and you will see alot of templates to choose from

Elements

Inside the Canva designer, the Elements tab gives you access to lines and shapes, graphics, photos, videos, audio, charts, photo frames, and photo grids.The search box on the Elements tab lets you search everything on Canva.

canva elements

To begin with, Canva has a large library of elements to choose from. To find them, be specific in your search query. You may also want to search in the following tabs to see various elements separately:

Photos

The Photos tab lets you search for and choose from millions of professional stock photos for your templates.

You can replace the photos in our templates to create a new look. This can also make the template more suited to your industry.

You can find photos on other stock photography sites like pexel, pixabay and many more or simply upload your own photos.

canva photos

When you choose an image, Canva’s photo editing features let you adjust the photo’s settings (brightness, contrast, saturation, etc.), crop, or animate it.

 When you subscribe to Canva Pro, you get access to a number of premium features, including the Background Remover. This feature allows you to remove the background from any stock photo in  library or any image you upload.

Text

The Text tab lets you add headings, normal text, and graphical text to your design.

When you click on  text, you'll see options to adjust the font, font size, color, format, spacing, and text effects (like shadows). 

Canva Pro subscribers can choose from a large library of fonts on the Brand Kit or the Styles tab. Enterprise-level controls ensure that visual content remains on-brand, no matter how many people are working on it.

Audio

Create an animated image or video by adding audio to capture user’s attention in social news feeds.

If you want to use audio from another stock site or your own audio tracks, you can upload them in the Uploads tab or from the more option.

Video

Want to create your own videos? Choose from thousands of stock video clips. You’ll find videos that range upto 2 minutes

You can upload your own videos as well as videos from other stock sites in the Uploads tab. 

Once you have chosen a video, you can use the editing features in Canva to trim the video, flip it, and adjust its transparency.

Backgrounds

On the Background tab, you’ll find free stock photos to serve as backgrounds on your designs. Change out the background on a template to give it a more personal touch.

Styles


The Styles tab lets you quickly change the look and feel of your template with just a click. And if you have a Canva Pro subscription, you can upload your brand’s custom colors and fonts to ensure designs stay on brand.

Logos

If you have a Canva Pro subscription, you’ll have a Logos tab. Here, you can upload variations of your brand logo to use throughout your designs.

With Canva, you can also create your own logos. Note that you cannot trademark a logo with stock content in it.

Publishing with Canva

With Canva, free users can download and share designs to multiple platforms including Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Slack and Tumblr.

Canva Pro subscribers can create multiple post formats from one design. For example, you can start by designing an Instagram post, and Canva's Magic Resizer can resize it for other networks, Stories, Reels, and other formats.

Canva Pro subscribers can also use Canva’s Content Planner to post content on eight different accounts on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Slack, and Tumblr.

Canva Team

Canva Pro allows you to work with your team on visual content. Designs can be created inside Canva, and then sent to your team members for approval. Everyone can make comments, edits, revisions, and keep track via the version history.

Canva Print

When it comes to printing your designs, Canva has you covered. With an extensive selection of printing options, they can turn your designs into anything from banners and wall art to mugs and t-shirts. 

Canva Print is perfect for any business seeking to make a lasting impression. Create inspiring designs people will want to wear, keep, and share. Hand out custom business cards that leave a lasting impression on customers' minds.

Canva Apps

The Canva app is available on the Apple App Store and Google Play. The Canva app has earned a 4.9 out of five star rating from over 946.3K Apple users and a 4.5 out of five star rating from over 6,996,708 Google users.

In addition to mobile apps, you can use Canva’s integration with other Internet services to add images and text from sources like Google Maps, Emojis, photos from Google Drive and Dropbox, YouTube videos, Flickr photos, Bitmojis, and other popular visual content elements.

Canva Pros and Cons

Pros:

  • A user-friendly interface
  • Canva is a great tool for people who want to create professional graphics but don’t have graphic design skills.
  • Hundreds of templates, so you'll never have to start from scratch.
  • Wide variety of templates to fit multiple uses
  • Branding kits to keep your team consistent with the brand colors and fonts
  • Creating visual content on the go
  • You can find royalty free images, audio, and video without having to subscribe to another service.

Cons:

  • Some professional templates are available for Pro user only
  • Advanced photo editing features like blurring or erasing a specific area are missing.
  • Some elements that fall outside of a design are tricky to retrieve.
  • Features (like Canva presentations) could use some improvement.
  • If you are a regular user of Adobe products, you might find Canva's features limited.
  • Prefers to work with vectors. Especially logos.
  • Expensive enterprise pricing

Conclusion

In general, Canva is an excellent tool for those who need simple images for projects. If you are a graphic designer with experience, you will find Canva’s platform lacking in customization and advanced features – particularly vectors. But if you have little design experience, you will find Canva easier to use than advanced graphic design tools like Adobe Photoshop or Illustrator for most projects. If you have any queries let me know in the comments section.






Match ID: 139 Score: 8.57 source: www.crunchhype.com age: 90 days
qualifiers: 3.57 trade, 3.57 google, 1.43 apple

Satellite Imagery for Everyone
Sat, 19 Feb 2022 16:00:00 +0000


Every day, satellites circling overhead capture trillions of pixels of high-resolution imagery of the surface below. In the past, this kind of information was mostly reserved for specialists in government or the military. But these days, almost anyone can use it.

That’s because the cost of sending payloads, including imaging satellites, into orbit has dropped drastically. High-resolution satellite images, which used to cost tens of thousands of dollars, now can be had for the price of a cup of coffee.

What’s more, with the recent advances in artificial intelligence, companies can more easily extract the information they need from huge digital data sets, including ones composed of satellite images. Using such images to make business decisions on the fly might seem like science fiction, but it is already happening within some industries.


This image shows are variety of blue and green hues, interwoven in a geometrically intriguing way.

These underwater sand dunes adorn the seafloor between Andros Island and the Exuma islands in the Bahamas. The turquoise to the right reflects a shallow carbonate bank, while the dark blue to the left marks the edge of a local deep called Tongue of the Ocean. This image was captured in April 2020 using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer on NASA’s Terra satellite.

Joshua Stevens/NASA Earth Observatory


Here’s a brief overview of how you, too, can access this kind of information and use it to your advantage. But before you’ll be able to do that effectively, you need to learn a little about how modern satellite imagery works.

The orbits of Earth-observation satellites generally fall into one of two categories: GEO and LEO. The former is shorthand for geosynchronous equatorial orbit. GEO satellites are positioned roughly 36,000 kilometers above the equator, where they circle in sync with Earth’s rotation. Viewed from the ground, these satellites appear to be stationary, in the sense that their bearing and elevation remain constant. That’s why GEO is said to be a geostationary orbit.

Such orbits are, of course, great for communications relays—it’s what allows people to mount satellite-TV dishes on their houses in a fixed orientation. But GEO satellites are also appropriate when you want to monitor some region of Earth by capturing images over time. Because the satellites are so high up, the resolution of that imagery is quite coarse, however. So these orbits are primarily used for observation satellites designed to track changing weather conditions over broad areas.

Being stationary with respect to Earth means that GEO satellites are always within range of a downlink station, so they can send data back to Earth in minutes. This allows them to alert people to changes in weather patterns almost in real time. Most of this kind of data is made available for free by the U.S. National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration.


This black-and-white image shows a narrow waterway blocked by a large ship. The resolution of the image is sufficient to make out individual shipping containers on its deck, as well as the tugboats arrayed around it.

In March 2021, the container ship Ever Given ran aground, blocking the Suez Canal for six days. This satellite image of the scene, obtained using synthetic-aperture radar, shows the kind resolution that is possible with this technology.

Capella Space


The other option is LEO, which stands for low Earth orbit. Satellites placed in LEO are much closer to the ground, which allows them to obtain higher-resolution images. And the lower you can go, the better the resolution you can get. The company Planet, for example, increased the resolution of its recently completed satellite constellation, SkySat, from 72 centimeters per pixel to just 50 cm—an incredible feat—by lowering the orbits its satellites follow from 500 to 450 km and improving the image processing.

The best commercially available spatial resolution for optical imagery is 25 cm, which means that one pixel represents a 25-by-25-cm area on the ground—roughly the size of your laptop. A handful of companies capture data with 25-cm to 1-meter resolution, which is considered high to very high resolution in this industry. Some of these companies also offer data from 1- to 5-meter resolution, considered medium to high resolution. Finally, several government programs have made optical data available at 10-, 15-, 30-, and 250-meter resolutions for free with open data programs. These include NASA/U.S. Geological Survey Landsat, NASA MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), and ESA Copernicus. This imagery is considered low resolution.

Because the satellites that provide the highest-resolution images are in the lowest orbits, they sense less area at once. To cover the entire planet, a satellite can be placed in a polar orbit, which takes it from pole to pole. As it travels, Earth rotates under it, so on its next pass, it will be above a different part of Earth.

Many of these satellites don’t pass directly over the poles, though. Instead, they are placed in a near-polar orbit that has been specially designed to take advantage of a subtle bit of physics. You see, the spinning Earth bulges outward slightly at the equator. That extra mass causes the orbits of satellites that are not in polar orbits to shift or (technically speaking) to precess. Satellite operators often take advantage of this phenomenon to put a satellite in what’s called a sun-synchronous orbit. Such orbits allow the repeated passes of the satellite over a given spot to take place at the same time of day. Not having the pattern of shadows shift between passes helps the people using these images to detect changes.




It usually takes 24 hours for a satellite in polar orbit to survey the entire surface of Earth. To image the whole world more frequently, satellite companies use multiple satellites, all equipped with the same sensor and following different orbits. In this way, these companies can provide more frequently updated images of a given location. For example, Maxar’s Worldview Legion constellation, launching later this year, includes six satellites.

After a satellite captures some number of images, all that data needs to be sent down to Earth and processed. The time required for that varies.

DigitalGlobe (which Maxar acquired in 2017) recently announced that it had managed to send data from a satellite down to a ground station and then store it in the cloud in less than a minute. That was possible because the image sent back was of the parking lot of the ground station, so the satellite didn’t have to travel between the collection point and where it had to be to do the data “dumping,” as this process is called.

In general, Earth-observation satellites in LEO don’t capture imagery all the time—they do that only when they are above an area of special interest. That’s because these satellites are limited to how much data they can send at one time. Typically, they can transmit data for only 10 minutes or so before they get out of range of a ground station. And they cannot record more data than they’ll have time to dump.

Currently, ground stations are located mostly near the poles, the most visited areas in polar orbits. But we can soon expect distances to the nearest ground station to shorten because both Amazon and Microsoft have announced intentions to build large networks of ground stations located all over the world. As it turns out, hosting the terabytes of satellite data that are collected daily is big business for these companies, which sell their cloud services (Amazon Web Services and Microsoft’s Azure) to satellite operators.

For now, if you are looking for imagery of an area far from a ground station, expect a significant delay—maybe hours—between capture and transmission of the data. The data will then have to be processed, which adds yet more time. The fastest providers currently make their data available within 48 hours of capture, but not all can manage that. While it is possible, under ideal weather conditions, for a commercial entity to request a new capture and get the data it needs delivered the same week, such quick turnaround times are still considered cutting edge.


The best commercially available spatial resolution is 25 centimeters for optical imagery, which means that one pixel represents something roughly the size of your laptop.


I’ve been using the word “imagery,” but it’s important to note that satellites do not capture images the same way ordinary cameras do. The optical sensors in satellites are calibrated to measure reflectance over specific bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. This could mean they record how much red, green, and blue light is reflected from different parts of the ground. The satellite operator will then apply a variety of adjustments to correct colors, combine adjacent images, and account for parallax, forming what’s called a true-color composite image, which looks pretty much like what you would expect to get from a good camera floating high in the sky and pointed directly down.

Imaging satellites can also capture data outside of the visible-light spectrum. The near-infrared band is widely used in agriculture, for example, because these images help farmers gauge the health of their crops. This band can also be used to detect soil moisture and a variety of other ground features that would otherwise be hard to determine.

Longer-wavelength “thermal” IR does a good job of penetrating smoke and picking up heat sources, making it useful for wildfire monitoring. And synthetic-aperture radar satellites, which I discuss in greater detail below, are becoming more common because the images they produce aren’t affected by clouds and don’t require the sun for illumination.

You might wonder whether aerial imagery, say, from a drone, wouldn’t work at least as well as satellite data. Sometimes it can. But for many situations, using satellites is the better strategy. Satellites can capture imagery over areas that would be difficult to access otherwise because of their remoteness, for example. Or there could be other sorts of accessibility issues: The area of interest could be in a conflict zone, on private land, or in another place that planes or drones cannot overfly.

So with satellites, organizations can easily monitor the changes taking place at various far-flung locations. Satellite imagery allows pipeline operators, for instance, to quickly identify incursions into their right-of-way zones. The company can then take steps to prevent a disastrous incident, such as someone puncturing a gas pipeline while construction is taking place nearby.


\u200bThis satellite image shows a snow-covered area. A tongue of darker material is draped over the side of a slope, impinging on a nearby developed area with buildings.

This SkySat image shows the effect of a devastating landslide that took place on 30 December 2020. Debris from that landslide destroyed buildings and killed 10 people in the Norwegian village of Ask.

SkySat/Planet



The ability to compare archived imagery with recently acquired data has helped a variety of industries. For example, insurance companies sometimes use satellite data to detect fraudulent claims (“Looks like your house had a damaged roof when you bought it…”). And financial-investment firms use satellite imagery to evaluate such things as retailers’ future profits based on parking-lot fullness or to predict crop prices before farmers report their yields for the season.

Satellite imagery provides a particularly useful way to find or monitor the location of undisclosed features or activities. Sarah Parcak of the University of Alabama, for example, uses satellite imagery to locate archaeological sites of interest. 52Impact, a consulting company in the Netherlands, identified undisclosed waste dump sites by training an algorithm to recognize their telltale spectral signature. Satellite imagery has also helped identify illegal fishing activities, fight human trafficking, monitor oil spills, get accurate reporting on COVID-19 deaths, and even investigate Uyghur internment camps in China—all situations where the primary actors couldn’t be trusted to accurately report what’s going on.

Despite these many successes, investigative reporters and nongovernmental organizations aren’t yet using satellite data regularly, perhaps because even the small cost of the imagery is a deterrent. Thankfully, some kinds of low-resolution satellite data can be had for free.

The first place to look for free satellite imagery is the Copernicus Open Access Hub and EarthExplorer. Both offer free access to a wide range of open data. The imagery is lower resolution than what you can purchase, but if the limited resolution meets your needs, why spend money?

If you require medium- or high-resolution data, you might be able to buy it directly from the relevant satellite operator. This field recently went through a period of mergers and acquisitions, leaving only a handful of providers, the big three in the West being Maxar and Planet in the United States and Airbus in Germany. There are also a few large Asian providers, such as SI Imaging Services in South Korea and Twenty First Century Aerospace Technology in Singapore. Most providers have a commercial branch, but they primarily target government buyers. And they often require large minimum purchases, which is unhelpful to companies looking to monitor hundreds of locations or fewer.

Expect the distance to the nearest ground station to shorten because both Amazon and Microsoft have announced intentions to build large networks of ground stations located all over the world.

Fortunately, approaching a satellite operator isn’t the only option. In the past five years, a cottage industry of consultants and local resellers with exclusive deals to service a certain market has sprung up. Aggregators and resellers spend years negotiating contracts with multiple providers so they can offer customers access to data sets at more attractive prices, sometimes for as little as a few dollars per image. Some companies providing geographic information systems—including Esri, L3Harris, and Safe Software—have also negotiated reselling agreements with satellite-image providers.

Traditional resellers are middlemen who will connect you with a salesperson to discuss your needs, obtain quotes from providers on your behalf, and negotiate pricing and priority schedules for image capture and sometimes also for the processing of the data. This is the case for Apollo Mapping, European Space Imaging, Geocento, LandInfo, Satellite Imaging Corp., and many more. The more innovative resellers will give you access to digital platforms where you can check whether an image you need is available from a certain archive and then order it. Examples include LandViewer from EOS and Image Hunter from Apollo Mapping.

More recently, a new crop of aggregators began offering customers the ability to programmatically access Earth-observation data sets. These companies work best for people looking to integrate such data into their own applications or workflows. These include the company I work for, SkyWatch, which provides such a service, called EarthCache. Other examples are UP42 from Airbus and Sentinel Hub from Sinergise.

While you will still need to talk with a sales rep to activate your account—most often to verify you will use the data in ways that fits the company’s terms of service and licensing agreements—once you’ve been granted access to their applications, you will be able to programmatically order archive data from one or multiple providers. SkyWatch is, however, the only aggregator allowing users to programmatically request future data to be collected (“tasking a satellite”).

While satellite imagery is fantastically abundant and easy to access today, two changes are afoot that will expand further what you can do with satellite data: faster revisits and greater use of synthetic-aperture radar (SAR).

This image shows a sprawling compound of dozens of large buildings located in a desert area.

This image shows a race-track shaped structure with a tall chimney in the middle, built in an area where the ground is a distinctly reddish hue. Satellite images have helped to reveal China’s treatment of its Muslim Uyghur minority. About a million Uyghurs (and other ethnic minorities) have been interned in prisons or camps like the one shown here [top], which lies to the east of the city of Ürümqi, the capital of China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. Another satellite image [bottom] shows the characteristic oval shape of a fixed-chimney Bull’s trench kiln, a type widely used for manufacturing bricks in southern Asia. This one is located in Pakistan’s Punjab province. This design poses environmental concerns because of the sooty air pollution it generates, and such kilns have also been associated with human-rights abuses.Top: CNES/Airbus/Google Earth; Bottom: Maxar Technologies/Google Earth

The first of these developments is not surprising. As more Earth-observation satellites are put into orbit, more images will be taken, more often. So how frequently a given area is imaged by a satellite will increase. Right now, that’s typically two or three times a week. Expect the revisit rate soon to become several times a day. This won’t entirely address the challenge of clouds obscuring what you want to view, but it will help.

The second development is more subtle. Data from the two satellites of the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-1 SAR mission, available at no cost, has enabled companies to dabble in SAR over the last few years.

With SAR, the satellite beams radio waves down and measures the return signals bouncing off the surface. It does that continually, and clever processing is used to turn that data into images. The use of radio allows these satellites to see through clouds and to collect measurements day and night. Depending on the radar band that’s employed, SAR imagery can be used to judge material properties, moisture content, precise movements, and elevation.

As more companies get familiar with such data sets, there will no doubt be a growing demand for satellite SAR imagery, which has been widely used by the military since the 1970s. But it’s just now starting to appear in commercial products. You can expect those offerings to grow dramatically, though.

Indeed, a large portion of the money being invested in this industry is currently going to fund large SAR constellations, including those of Capella Space, Iceye, Synspective, XpressSAR, and others. The market is going to get crowded fast, which is great news for customers. It means they will be able to obtain high-resolution SAR images of the place they’re interested in, taken every hour (or less), day or night, cloudy or clear.

People will no doubt figure out wonderful new ways to employ this information, so the more folks who have access to it, the better. This is something my colleagues at SkyWatch and I deeply believe, and it’s why we’ve made it our mission to help democratize access to satellite imagery.

One day in the not-so-distant future, Earth-observation satellite data might become as ubiquitous as GPS, another satellite technology first used only by the military. Imagine, for example, being able to take out your phone and say something like, “Show me this morning’s soil-moisture map for Grover’s Corners High; I want to see whether the baseball fields are still soggy.”

This article appears in the March 2022 print issue as “A Boom with a View.”

Editor's note: The original version of this article incorrectly stated that Maxar's Worldview Legion constellation launched last year.


Match ID: 140 Score: 7.86 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 91 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google, 1.43 microsoft, 1.43 development, 1.43 amazon

The Triumph of Marcos Dynasty Disinformation Is a Warning to the U.S.
Tue, 17 May 2022 20:03:59 +0000
Maria Ressa and her staff at Rappler exposed the family’s false narratives, but social-media mythmaking prevailed in a historic election in the Philippines.
Match ID: 141 Score: 7.14 source: www.newyorker.com age: 4 days
qualifiers: 7.14 apple

Your iPhone Is Vulnerable to a Malware Attack Even When It’s Off
Tue, 17 May 2022 19:20:00 +0000
Researchers found a way to exploit the tech that enables Apple’s Find My feature, which could allow attackers to track location when a device is powered down.
Match ID: 142 Score: 7.14 source: www.wired.com age: 4 days
qualifiers: 7.14 apple

An Urban Wildlife Bridge Is Coming to California
Tue, 17 May 2022 10:00:00 +0000
The crossing will span Route 101, providing safe passage for mountain lions and other animals hemmed in by the freeways that surround the Santa Monica Mountains.
Match ID: 143 Score: 7.14 source: www.newyorker.com age: 4 days
qualifiers: 7.14 california

Tony Fadell: The Nest Thermostat Disrupted My Life
Sat, 07 May 2022 15:00:01 +0000


The thermostat chased me for 10 years.

That is pretty extreme, by the way. If you’ve got an idea for a business or a new product, you usually don’t have to wait a decade to make sure it’s worth doing.

For most of the 10 years that I idly thought about thermostats, I had no intention of building one. It was the early 2000s, and I was at Apple making the first iPhone. I got married, had kids. I was busy.

But then again, I was also really cold. Bone-chillingly cold.

Every time my wife and I drove up to our Lake Tahoe ski cabin on Friday nights after work, we’d have to keep our snow jackets on until the next day. The house took all night to heat up.


Book cover for Build by Tony Fadell

Adapted from the book BUILD: An Unorthodox Guide to Making Things Worth Making by Tony Fadell. Copyright 2022 by Tony Fadell. Reprinted by permission of Harper Business, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.


Walking into that frigid house drove me nuts. It was mind-boggling that there wasn’t a way to warm it up before we got there. I spent dozens of hours and thousands of dollars trying to hack security and computer equipment tied to an analog phone so I could fire up the thermostat remotely. Half my vacations were spent elbow-deep in wiring, electronics littering the floor. But nothing worked. So the first night of every trip was always the same: We’d huddle on the ice block of a bed, under the freezing sheets, watching our breath turn into fog until the house finally warmed up by morning.

Then on Monday I’d go back to Apple and work on the first iPhone. Eventually I realized I was making a perfect remote control for a thermostat. If I could just connect the HVAC system to my iPhone, I could control it from anywhere. But the technology that I needed to make it happen—reliable low-cost communications, cheap screens and processors—didn’t exist yet.


How did these ugly, piece-of-crap thermostats cost almost as much as Apple’s most cutting-edge technology?


A year later we decided to build a new, superefficient house in Tahoe. During the day I’d work on the iPhone, then I’d come home and pore over specs for our house, choosing finishes and materials and solar panels and, eventually, tackling the HVAC system. And once again, the thermostat came to haunt me. All the top-of-the-line thermostats were hideous beige boxes with bizarrely confusing user interfaces. None of them saved energy. None could be controlled remotely. And they cost around US $400. The iPhone, meanwhile, was selling for $499.


How did these ugly, piece-of-crap thermostats cost almost as much as Apple’s most cutting-edge technology?

The architects and engineers on the Tahoe project heard me complaining over and over about how insane it was. I told them, “One day, I’m going to fix this—mark my words!” They all rolled their eyes—there goes Tony complaining again!

At first they were just idle words born of frustration. But then things started to change. The success of the iPhone drove down costs for the sophisticated components I couldn’t get my hands on earlier. Suddenly high-quality connectors and screens and processors were being manufactured by the millions, cheaply, and could be repurposed for other technology.

My life was changing, too. I quit Apple and began traveling the world with my family. A startup was not the plan. The plan was a break. A long one.

We traveled all over the globe and worked hard not to think about work. But no matter where we went, we could not escape one thing: the goddamn thermostat. The infuriating, inaccurate, energy-hogging, thoughtlessly stupid, impossible-to-program, always-too-hot-or-too-cold-in-some-part-of-the-house thermostat.

Someone needed to fix it. And eventually I realized that someone was going to be me.

Hardware including a square with electronics and paper with CAD electronic diagrams. This 2010 prototype of the Nest thermostat wasn’t pretty. But making the thermometer beautiful would be the easy part. The circuit board diagrams point to the next step—making it round.Tom Crabtree

The big companies weren’t going to do it. Honeywell and the other white-box competitors hadn’t truly innovated in 30 years. It was a dead, unloved market with less than $1 billion in total annual sales in the United States.

The only thing missing was the will to take the plunge. I wasn’t ready to carry another startup on my back. Not then. Not alone.

Then, magically, Matt Rogers, who’d been one of the first interns on the iPod project, reached out to me. He was a real partner who could share the load. So I let the idea catch me. I came back to Silicon Valley and got to work. I researched the technology, then the opportunity, the business, the competition, the people, the financing, the history.

Making it beautiful wasn’t going to be hard. Gorgeous hardware, an intuitive interface—that we could do. We’d honed those skills at Apple. But to make this product successful—and meaningful—we needed to solve two big problems:

It needed to save energy.

And we needed to sell it.

In North America and Europe, thermostats control half a home’s energy bill—something like $2,500 a year. Every previous attempt to reduce that number—by thermostat manufacturers, by energy companies, by government bodies—had failed miserably for a host of different reasons. We had to do it for real, while keeping it dead simple for customers.

Then we needed to sell it. Almost all thermostats at that point were sold and installed by professional HVAC technicians. We were never going to break into that old boys’ club. We had to find a way into people’s minds first, then their homes. And we had to make our thermostat so easy to install that literally anyone could do it themselves.

It took around 9 to 12 months of making prototypes and interactive models, building bits of software, talking to users and experts, and testing it with friends before Matt and I decided to pitch investors.

“Real People” Test the Nest

Once we had prototypes of the thermostat, we sent it out to real people to test.

It was fatter than we wanted. The screen wasn’t quite what I imagined. Kind of like the first iPod, actually. But it worked. It connected to your phone. It learned what temperatures you liked. It turned itself down when nobody was home. It saved energy. We knew self-installation was potentially a huge stumbling block, so everyone waited with bated breath to see how it went. Did people shock themselves? Start a fire? Abandon the project halfway through because it was too complicated? Soon our testers reported in: Installation went fine. People loved it. But it took about an hour to install. Crap. An hour was way too long. This needed to be an easy DIY project, a quick upgrade.

So we dug into the reports—what was taking so long? What were we missing?

Our testers...spent the first 30 minutes looking for tools.

Turns out we weren’t missing anything—but our testers were. They spent the first 30 minutes looking for tools—the wire stripper, the flathead screwdriver; no, wait, we need a Phillips. Where did I put that?

Once they gathered everything they needed, the rest of the installation flew by. Twenty, 30 minutes tops.

I suspect most companies would have sighed with relief. The actual installation took 20 minutes, so that’s what they’d tell customers. Great. Problem solved.

But this was going to be the first moment people interacted with our device. Their first experience of Nest. They were buying a $249 thermostat—they were expecting a different kind of experience. And we needed to exceed their expectations. Every minute from opening the box to reading the instructions to getting it on their wall to turning on the heat for the first time had to be incredibly smooth. A buttery, warm, joyful experience.

And we knew Beth. Beth was one of two potential customers we defined. The other customer was into technology, loved his iPhone, was always looking for cool new gadgets. Beth was the decider—she dictated what made it into the house and what got returned. She loved beautiful things, too, but was skeptical of supernew, untested technology. Searching for a screwdriver in the kitchen drawer and then the toolbox in the garage would not make her feel warm and buttery. She would be rolling her eyes. She would be frustrated and annoyed.

A white handheld device with 4 screwdriver heads, one on the bottom, and three at the top. Shipping the Nest thermostat with a screwdriver "turned a moment of frustration into a moment of delight"Dwight Eschliman

So we changed the prototype. Not the thermostat prototype—the installation prototype. We added one new element: a little screwdriver. It had four different head options, and it fit in the palm of your hand. It was sleek and cute. Most importantly, it was unbelievably handy.

So now, instead of rummaging through toolboxes and cupboards, trying to find the right tool to pry their old thermostat off the wall, customers simply reached into the Nest box and took out exactly what they needed. It turned a moment of frustration into a moment of delight.

Honeywell Laughs

Sony laughed at the iPod. Nokia laughed at the iPhone. Honeywell laughed at the Nest Learning Thermostat.

At first.

In the stages of grief, this is what we call Denial.

But soon, as your disruptive product, process, or business model begins to gain steam with customers, your competitors will start to get worried. And when they realize you might steal their market share, they’ll get pissed. Really pissed. When people hit the Anger stage of grief, they lash out, they undercut your pricing, try to embarrass you with advertising, use negative press to undermine you, put in new agreements with sales channels to lock you out of the market.

And they might sue you.

The good news is that a lawsuit means you’ve officially arrived. We had a party the day Honeywell sued Nest. We were thrilled. That ridiculous lawsuit meant we were a real threat and they knew it. So we brought out the champagne. That’s right, f---ers. We’re coming for your lunch.

Nest Gets Googled

With every generation, the product became sleeker, slimmer, and less expensive to build. In 2014, Google bought Nest for $3.2 billion. In 2016 Google decided to sell Nest, so I left the company. Months after I left, Google changed its mind. Today, Google Nest is alive and well, and they’re still making new products, creating new experiences, delivering on their version of our vision. I deeply, genuinely, wish them well.


Match ID: 144 Score: 7.14 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 14 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google, 1.43 apple, 1.43 amazon, 0.71 startup

12 Exciting Engineering Milestones to Look for in 2022
Thu, 30 Dec 2021 16:00:00 +0000


Psyche’s Deep-Space Lasers


An illustration of a satellite holding a ray gun in a cartoon style hand. MCKIBILLO

In August, NASA will launch the Psyche mission, sending a deep-space orbiter to a weird metal asteroid orbiting between Mars and Jupiter. While the probe’s main purpose is to study Psyche’s origins, it will also carry an experiment that could inform the future of deep-space communications. The Deep Space Optical Communications (DSOC) experiment will test whether lasers can transmit signals beyond lunar orbit. Optical signals, such as those used in undersea fiber-optic cables, can carry more data than radio signals can, but their use in space has been hampered by difficulties in aiming the beams accurately over long distances. DSOC will use a 4-watt infrared laser with a wavelength of 1,550 nanometers (the same used in many optical fibers) to send optical signals at multiple distances during Psyche’s outward journey to the asteroid.


The Great Electric Plane Race


An illustration of a battery with wings and a spinning propeller. MCKIBILLO

For the first time in almost a century, the U.S.-based National Aeronautic Association (NAA) will host a cross-country aircraft race. Unlike the national air races of the 1920s, however, the Pulitzer Electric Aircraft Race, scheduled for 19 May, will include only electric-propulsion aircraft. Both fixed-wing craft and helicopters are eligible. The competition will be limited to 25 contestants, and each aircraft must have an onboard pilot. The course will start in Omaha and end four days later in Manteo, N.C., near the site of the Wright brothers’ first flight. The NAA has stated that the goal of the cross-country, multiday race is to force competitors to confront logistical problems that still plague electric aircraft, like range, battery charging, reliability, and speed.

6-Gigahertz Wi-Fi Goes Mainstream

An illustration of the wifi signal and an arrow near the word \u201c6Ghz.\u201d MCKIBILLO

Wi-Fi is getting a boost with 1,200 megahertz of new spectrum in the 6-gigahertz band, adding a third spectrum band to the more familiar 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz. The new band is called Wi-Fi 6E because it extends Wi-Fi’s capabilities into the 6-GHz band. As a rule, higher radio frequencies have higher data capacity, but a shorter range. With its higher frequencies, 6-GHz Wi-Fi is expected to find use in heavy traffic environments like offices and public hotspots. The Wi-Fi Alliance introduced a Wi-Fi 6E certification program in January 2021, and the first trickle of 6E routers appeared by the end of the year. In 2022, expect to see a bonanza of Wi-Fi 6E–enabled smartphones.

3-Nanometer Chips Arrive

An illustration of a chip dancing and holding a hat with \u201c3nm\u201d at the center. MCKIBILLO

Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. (TSMC) plans to begin producing 3-nanometer semiconductor chips in the second half of 2022. Right now, 5-nm chips are the standard. TSMC will make its 3-nm chips using a tried-and-true semiconductor structure called the FinFET (short for “fin field-effect transistor”). Meanwhile, Samsung and Intel are moving to a different technique for 3 nm called nanosheet. (TSMC is eventually planning to abandon FinFETs.) At one point, TSMC’s sole 3-nm chip customer for 2022 was Apple, for the latter’s iPhone 14, but supply-chain issues have made it less certain that TSMC will be able to produce enough chips—which promise more design flexibility—to fulfill even that order.

Seoul Joins the Metaverse

An illustration of a building MCKIBILLO

After Facebook (now Meta) announced it was hell-bent on making the metaverse real, a host of other tech companies followed suit. Definitions differ, but the basic idea of the metaverse involves merging virtual reality and augmented reality with actual reality. Also jumping on the metaverse bandwagon is the government of the South Korean capital, Seoul, which plans to develop a “metaverse platform” by the end of 2022. To build this first public metaverse, Seoul will invest 3.9 billion won (US $3.3 million). The platform will offer public services and cultural events, beginning with the Metaverse 120 Center, a virtual-reality portal for citizens to address concerns that previously required a trip to city hall. Other planned projects include virtual exhibition halls for school courses and a digital representation of Deoksu Palace. The city expects the project to be complete by 2026.

IBM’s Condors Take Flight

An illustration of a bird made up of squares. MCKIBILLO

In 2022, IBM will debut a new quantum processor—its biggest yet—as a stepping-stone to a 1,000-qubit processor by the end of 2023. This year’s iteration will contain 433 qubits, three times as much as the company’s 127-qubit Eagle processor, which was launched last year. Following the bird theme, the 433- and 1,000-qubit processors will be named Condor. There have been quantum computers with many more qubits; D-Wave Systems, for example, announced a 5,000-qubit computer in 2020. However, D-Wave’s computers are specialized machines for optimization problems. IBM’s Condors aim to be the largest general-purpose quantum processors.

New Dark-Matter Detector

An illustration of two dotted arrow headed lines and two circles with the letter \u201cp\u201d on them. MCKIBILLO

The Forward Search Experiment (FASER) at CERN is slated to switch on in July 2022. The exact date depends on when the Large Hadron Collider is set to renew proton-proton collisions after three years of upgrades and maintenance. FASER will begin a hunt for dark matter and other particles that interact extremely weakly with “normal” matter. CERN, the fundamental physics research center near Geneva, has four main detectors attached to its Large Hadron Collider, but they aren’t well-suited to detecting dark matter. FASER won’t attempt to detect the particles directly; instead, it will search for the more strongly interacting Standard Model particles created when dark matter interacts with something else. The new detector was constructed while the collider was shut down from 2018 to 2021. Located 480 meters “downstream” of the ATLAS detector, FASER will also hunt for neutrinos produced in huge quantities by particle collisions in the LHC loop. The other CERN detectors have so far failed to detect such neutrinos.

Pong Turns 50

An illustration of the pong game with the numbers \u201c6\u201d and \u201c9\u201d on top. MCKIBILLO

Atari changed the course of video games when it released its first game, Pong, in 1972. While not the first video game—or even the first to be presented in an upright, arcade-style cabinet—Pong was the first to be commercially successful. The game was developed by engineer Allan Alcorn and originally assigned to him as a test after he was hired, before he began working on actual projects. However, executives at Atari saw potential in Pong’s simple game play and decided to develop it into a real product. Unlike the countless video games that came after it, the original Pong did not use any code or microprocessors. Instead, it was built from a television and transistor-transistor logic.

The Green Hydrogen Boom

An illustration of a generator with large, circular blades. MCKIBILLO

Utility company Energias de Portugal (EDP), based in Lisbon, is on track to begin operating a 3-megawatt green hydrogen plant in Brazil by the end of the year. Green hydrogen is hydrogen produced in sustainable ways, using solar or wind-powered electrolyzers to split water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen. According to the International Energy Agency, only 0.1 percent of hydrogen is produced this way. The plant will replace an existing coal-fired plant and generate hydrogen—which can be used in fuel cells—using solar photovoltaics. EDP’s roughly US $7.9 million pilot program is just the tip of the green hydrogen iceberg. Enegix Energy has announced plans for a $5.4 billion green hydrogen plant in the same Brazilian state, Ceará, where the EDP plant is being built. The green hydrogen market is predicted to generate a revenue of nearly $10 billion by 2028, according to a November 2021 report by Research Dive.

A Permanent Space Station for China

An illustration of a space station MCKIBILLO

China is scheduled to complete its Tiangong (“Heavenly Palace”) space station in 2022. The station, China’s first long-term space habitat, was preceded by the Tiangong-1 and Tiangong-2 stations, which orbited from 2011 to 2018 and 2016 to 2019, respectively. The new station’s core module, the Tianhe, was launched in April 2021. A further 10 missions by the end of 2022 will deliver other components and modules, with construction to be completed in orbit. The final station will have two laboratory modules in addition to the core module. Tiangong will orbit at roughly the same altitude as the International Space Station but will be only about one-fifth the mass of the ISS.

A Cool Form of Energy Storage

An illustration of a lightning bolt in an ice cube. MCKIBILLO

Cryogenic energy-storage company Highview Power will begin operations at its Carrington plant near Manchester, England, this year. Cryogenic energy storage is a long-term method of storing electricity by cooling air until it liquefies (about –196 °C). Crucially, the air is cooled when electricity is cheaper—at night, for example—and then stored until electricity demand peaks. The liquid air is then allowed to boil back into a gas, which drives a turbine to generate electricity. The 50-megawatt/250-megawatt-hour Carrington plant will be Highview Power’s first commercial plant using its cryogenic storage technology, dubbed CRYOBattery. Highview Power has said it plans to build a similar plant in Vermont, although it has not specified a timeline yet.

Carbon-Neutral Cryptocurrency?

An illustration of a coin with stars around it. MCKIBILLO

Seattle-based startup Nori is set to offer a cryptocurrency for carbon removal. Nori will mint 500 million tokens of its Ethereum-based currency (called NORI). Individuals and companies can purchase and trade NORI, and eventually exchange any NORI they own for an equal number of carbon credits. Each carbon credit represents a tonne of carbon dioxide that has already been removed from the atmosphere and stored in the ground. When exchanged in this way, a NORI is retired, making it impossible for owners to try to “double count” carbon credits and therefore seem like they’re offsetting more carbon than they actually have. The startup has acknowledged that Ethereum and other blockchain-based technologies consume an enormous amount of energy, so the carbon it sequesters could conceivably originate in cryptocurrency mining. However, 2022 will also see Ethereum scheduled to switch to a much more energy-efficient method of verifying its blockchain, called proof-of-stake, which Nori will take advantage of when it launches.


Match ID: 145 Score: 7.14 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 142 days
qualifiers: 3.57 trade, 1.43 seattle, 1.43 apple, 0.71 startup

Most Frequently Asked Questions About NFTs(Non-Fungible Tokens)
Sun, 06 Feb 2022 10:04:00 +0000

 

NFTs

Non-fungible tokens (NFTs) are the most popular digital assets today, capturing the attention of cryptocurrency investors, whales and people from around the world. People find it amazing that some users spend thousands or millions of dollars on a single NFT-based image of a monkey or other token, but you can simply take a screenshot for free. So here we share some freuently asked question about NFTs.

1) What is an NFT?

NFT stands for non-fungible  token, which is a cryptographic token on a blockchain with unique identification codes that distinguish it from other tokens. NFTs are unique and not interchangeable, which means no two NFTs are the same. NFTs can be a unique artwork, GIF, Images, videos, Audio album. in-game items, collectibles etc.

2) What is Blockchain?

A blockchain is a distributed digital ledger that allows for the secure storage of data. By recording any kind of information—such as bank account transactions, the ownership of Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs), or Decentralized Finance (DeFi) smart contracts—in one place, and distributing it to many different computers, blockchains ensure that data can’t be manipulated without everyone in the system being aware.

3) What makes an NFT valuable?


The value of an NFT comes from its ability to be traded freely and securely on the blockchain, which is not possible with other current digital ownership solutionsThe NFT points to its location on the blockchain, but doesn’t necessarily contain the digital property. For example, if you replace one bitcoin with another, you will still have the same thing. If you buy a non-fungible item, such as a movie ticket, it is impossible to replace it with any other movie ticket because each ticket is unique to a specific time and place.

4) How do NFTs work?

One of the unique characteristics of non-fungible tokens (NFTs) is that they can be tokenised to create a digital certificate of ownership that can be bought, sold and traded on the blockchain. 

As with crypto-currency, records of who owns what are stored on a ledger that is maintained by thousands of computers around the world. These records can’t be forged because the whole system operates on an open-source network. 

NFTs also contain smart contracts—small computer programs that run on the blockchain—that give the artist, for example, a cut of any future sale of the token.

5) What’s the connection between NFTs and cryptocurrency?

Non-fungible tokens (NFTs) aren't cryptocurrencies, but they do use blockchain technology. Many NFTs are based on Ethereum, where the blockchain serves as a ledger for all the transactions related to said NFT and the properties it represents.5) How to make an NFT?

Anyone can create an NFT. All you need is a digital wallet, some ethereum tokens and a connection to an NFT marketplace where you’ll be able to upload and sell your creations

6) How to validate the authencity of an NFT?

When you purchase a stock in NFT, that purchase is recorded on the blockchain—the bitcoin ledger of transactions—and that entry acts as your proof of ownership.

7) How is an NFT valued? What are the most expensive NFTs?

The value of an NFT varies a lot based on the digital asset up for grabs. People use NFTs to trade and sell digital art, so when creating an NFT, you should consider the popularity of your digital artwork along with historical statistics.

In the year 2021, a digital artist called Pak created an artwork called The Merge. It was sold on the Nifty Gateway NFT market for $91.8 million.

8) Can NFTs be used as an investment?

Non-fungible tokens can be used in investment opportunities. One can purchase an NFT and resell it at a profit. Certain NFT marketplaces let sellers of NFTs keep a percentage of the profits from sales of the assets they create.

9) Will NFTs be the future of art and collectibles?

Many people want to buy NFTs because it lets them support the arts and own something cool from their favorite musicians, brands, and celebrities. NFTs also give artists an opportunity to program in continual royalties if someone buys their work. Galleries see this as a way to reach new buyers interested in art.

10) How do we buy an NFTs?

There are many places to buy digital assets, like opensea and their policies vary. On top shot, for instance, you sign up for a waitlist that can be thousands of people long. When a digital asset goes on sale, you are occasionally chosen to purchase it.

11) Can i mint NFT for free?

To mint an NFT token, you must pay some amount of gas fee to process the transaction on the Etherum blockchain, but you can mint your NFT on a different blockchain called Polygon to avoid paying gas fees. This option is available on OpenSea and this simply denotes that your NFT will only be able to trade using Polygon's blockchain and not Etherum's blockchain. Mintable allows you to mint NFTs for free without paying any gas fees.

12) Do i own an NFT if i screenshot it?

The answer is no. Non-Fungible Tokens are minted on the blockchain using cryptocurrencies such as Etherum, Solana, Polygon, and so on. Once a Non-Fungible Token is minted, the transaction is recorded on the blockchain and the contract or license is awarded to whoever has that Non-Fungible Token in their wallet.

12) Why are people investing so much in NFT?


 Non-fungible tokens have gained the hearts of people around the world, and they have given digital creators the recognition they deserve. One of the remarkable things about non-fungible tokens is that you can take a screenshot of one, but you don’t own it. This is because when a non-fungible token is created, then the transaction is stored on the blockchain, and the license or contract to hold such a token is awarded to the person owning the token in their digital wallet.

You can sell your work and creations by attaching a license to it on the blockchain, where its ownership can be transferred. This lets you get exposure without losing full ownership of your work. Some of the most successful projects include Cryptopunks, Bored Ape Yatch Club NFTs, SandBox, World of Women and so on. These NFT projects have gained popularity globally and are owned by celebrities and other successful entrepreneurs. Owning one of these NFTs gives you an automatic ticket to exclusive business meetings and life-changing connections.

Final Saying

That’s a wrap. Hope you guys found this article enlightening. I just answer some question with my limited knowledge about NFTs. If you have any questions or suggestions, feel free to drop them in the comment section below. Also I have a question for you, Is bitcoin an NFTs? let me know in The comment section below






Match ID: 146 Score: 7.14 source: www.crunchhype.com age: 104 days
qualifiers: 3.57 trade, 3.57 google

Stocks to Watch: Google, Barnes & Noble are stocks to watch Wednesday
Wed, 25 Jun 2014 15:17:02 GMT
Among the companies whose shares are expected to see active trade in Wednesday’s session are Google Inc., and Barnes and Noble Inc.

Match ID: 147 Score: 7.14 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 2887 days
qualifiers: 3.57 trade, 3.57 google

AI’s Threats to Jobs and Human Happiness Are Real
Thu, 12 May 2022 15:41:57 +0000


There’s a movement afoot to counter the dystopian and apocalyptic narratives of artificial intelligence. Some people in the field are concerned that the frequent talk of AI as an existential risk to humanity is poisoning the public against the technology and are deliberately setting out more hopeful narratives. One such effort is a book that came out last fall called AI 2041: Ten Visions for Our Future.

The book is cowritten by Kai-Fu Lee, an AI expert who leads the venture capital firm Sinovation Ventures, and Chen Qiufan, a science fiction author known for his novel Waste Tide. It has an interesting format. Each chapter starts with a science fiction story depicting some aspect of AI in society in the year 2041 (such as deepfakes, self-driving cars, and AI-enhanced education), which is followed by an analysis section by Lee that talks about the technology in question and the trends today that may lead to that envisioned future. It’s not a utopian vision, but the stories generally show humanity grappling productively with the issues raised by ever-advancing AI.

IEEE Spectrum spoke to Lee about the book, focusing on the last few chapters, which take on the big issues of job displacement, the need for new economic models, and the search for meaning and happiness in an age of abundance. Lee argues that technologists need to give serious thought to such societal impacts, instead of thinking only about the technology.

Kai-Fu Lee on…

The science fiction stories are set in 2041, by which time you expect AI to have already caused a lot of disruption to the job market. What types of jobs do you think will be displaced by then?

Kai-Fu Lee: Contrary to what a lot of people think, AI is actually just a piece of software that does routine work extremely well. So the jobs that will be the most challenged will be those that are routine and repetitive—and that includes both blue-collar and white-collar work. So obviously jobs like assembly line workers and people who operate the same equipment over and over again. And in terms of white-collar work, many entry-level jobs in accounting, paralegal, and other jobs where you’re repetitively moving data from one place to another, and jobs where you’re routinely dealing with people, such as customer-service jobs. Those are going to be the most challenged. If we add these up, it will be a very substantial portion of all jobs, even without major breakthroughs in AI—on the order of 40 to 50 percent.

The jobs that are most secure are those that require imagination, creativity, or empathy. And until AI gets good enough, there will also be craftsman jobs that require dexterity and a high level of hand-eye coordination. Those jobs will be secure for a while, but AI will improve and eventually take those over as well.

How do you imagine this trend is changing the engineering profession?

Lee: I think engineering is largely cerebral and somewhat creative work that requires analytical skills and deep understanding of problems. And those are generally hard for AI.

But if you’re a software engineer and most of your job is looking for pieces of code and copy-pasting them together—those jobs are in danger. And if you’re doing routine testing of software, those jobs are in danger too. If you’re writing a piece of code and it’s original creative work, but you know that this kind of code has been done before and can be done again, those jobs will gradually be challenged as well. For people in the engineering profession, this will push us towards more of an analytical architect role where we deeply understand the problems that are being solved, ideally problems that have complex characteristics and measurements. The ideal combination in most professions will be a human that has unique human capabilities managing a bunch of AI that do the routine parts.

It reminds me of the Ph.D. thesis of Charles Simonyi, the person who created Microsoft Word. He did an experiment to see what would happen if you have a really smart architect who can divvy up the job of writing a piece of code into well-contained modules that are easy to understand and well defined, and then outsource each module to an average engineer. Will the resulting product be good? It was good. We’re talking about the same thing, except we’re not outsourcing to the average engineer, who will have been replaced by AI. That superengineer will be able to delegate the work to a bunch of AI resulting in creativity and symbiosis. But there won’t be very many of these architect jobs.

In the book, you say that an entirely new social contract is needed. One problem is that there will be fewer entry-level jobs, but there still needs to be a way for people to gain skills. Can you imagine a solution for engineering?

Lee: Let’s say someone is talented and could become an architect, but that person just graduated from college and isn’t there yet. If they apply for a job to do entry-level programming and they’re competing for the job with AI, they might lose the job to the AI. That would be really bad because we will not only hurt the person’s self-confidence, but also society will lose the talent of that architect, which needs years of experience to build up.

But imagine if the company says, “We’re going to employ you anyway, even though you’re not as good as AI. We’re going to give you tasks and we’ll have AI work alongside you and correct your errors, and you can learn from it and improve.” If a thousand people go through this entry-level practical training, maybe a hundred emerge to be really good and be on their way to become architects. Maybe the other 900 will take longer and struggle, or maybe they’ll feel complacent and continue to do the work so they’re passing time and still have a chance to improve. Maybe some will say, “Hey, this is really not for me, I’m not reaching the architect level. I’m going to go become a photographer and artist or whatever.”

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Why do you think that this round of automation is different from those that came before in history, when jobs were both destroyed and created by automation?

Lee: First of all, I do think AI will both destroy and create jobs. I just can’t enumerate which jobs and how many. I tend to be an optimist and believe in the wisdom and the will of the human race. Eventually, we’ll figure out a bunch of new jobs. Maybe those jobs don’t exist today and have to be invented; maybe some of those jobs will be service jobs, human-connection jobs. I would say that every technology so far has ended up making society better, and there has never been a problem of absorbing the job losses. If you look at a 30-year horizon, I’m optimistic that that there will not be a net job loss, but possibly a net gain, or possibly equal. And we can always consider a four-day work week and things like that. So long-term, I’m optimistic.

Now to answer your question directly: short-term, I am worried. And the reason is that none of the previous technology revolutions have tried explicitly to replace people. No matter how people think about it, every AI algorithm is trying to display intelligence and therefore be able to do what people do. Maybe not an entire job, but some task. So naturally there will be a short-term drop when automation and AI start to work well.

“If you expect an assembly-line worker to become a robot-repair person, it isn’t going to be so easy.”
—Kai-Fu Lee, Sinovation Ventures

Autonomous vehicles are an explicit effort to replace drivers. A lot of people in the industry will say, “Oh no, we need a backup driver in the truck to make it safer, so we won’t displace jobs.” Or they’ll say that when we install robots in the factory, the factory workers are elevated to a higher-level job. But I think they’re just sugarcoating the reality.

Let’s say over a period of 20 years, with the advent of AI, we lose x number of jobs, and we also gain x jobs; let’s say the loss and gain are the same. The outcome is not that the society remains in equilibrium, because the jobs being lost are the most routine and unskilled. And the jobs being created are much more likely to be skilled and complex jobs that require much more training. If you expect an assembly-line worker to become a robot-repair person, it isn’t going to be so easy. That’s why I think the next 15 years or 20 years will be very chaotic. We need a lot of wisdom and long-term vision and decisiveness to overcome these problems.

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Currency

There are some interesting experiments going on with universal basic income (UBI), like Sam Altman’s ambitious idea for Worldcoin. But from the book, it seems like you don’t think that UBI is the answer. Is that correct?

Lee: UBI may be necessary, by it’s definitely not sufficient. We’re going to be in a world of very serious wealth inequality, and the people losing their jobs won’t have the experience or the education to get the right kinds of training. Unless we subsidize and help these people along, the inequality will be exacerbated. So how do we make them whole? One way is to make sure they don’t have to worry about subsistence. That’s where I think universal basic income comes into play by making sure nobody goes without food, shelter, water. I think that level of universal basic income is good.

As I mentioned before, the people who are most devastated, people who don’t have skills, are going to need a lot of help. But that help isn’t just money. If you just give people money, a wonderful apartment, really great food, Internet, games, and even extra allowance to spend, they are much more likely to say, “Well, I’ll just stay home and play games. I’ll go into the metaverse.” They may even go to alcohol or substance abuse because those are the easiest things to do.

So what else do they need?

Lee: Imagine the mind-set of a person whose job was taken away by automation. That person has been to be thinking, “Wow, everything I know how to do, AI can do. Everything I learn, AI will be able to do. So why should I take the universal basic income and apply that to learning?” And even if that person does decide to get training, how can they know what to get training on? Imagine I’m an assembly-line worker and I lost my job. I might think, truck driver, that’s a highly paid job. I’ll do that. But then in five years those jobs are going to be gone. A robot-repair job would be a much more sustainable job than a truck driver, but the person who just lost a job doesn’t know it.

So the point I make in the book is: To help people stay gainfully employed and have hope for themselves, it’s important that they get guidance on what jobs they can do that will, first of all, give people a sense of contribution, because then at least we eliminate the possibility of social unrest. Second, that job should be interesting, so the person wants to do it. Third, if possible, that job should have economic value.

Why do you put economic value last in that list?

Lee: Most people think jobs need to have economic value. If you’re making cars, the cars are sold. If you’re writing books, the books are sold. If you just volunteer and take care of old people, you’re not creating economic value. If we stay in that mentality, that would be very unfortunate, because we may very well be in a time when what is truly valuable to society is people taking care of each other. That might be the glue that keeps society going.

More thought should go into how to deal with the likely anxiety and depression and the sense of loss that people will have when their jobs are taken and they don’t know what to do. What they need is not just a bunch of money, but a combination of subsistence, training, and help finding a new beginning. Who cares if they create economic value? Because as the last chapter states, I believe we’re going to reach the era of plenitude. We’re not going to be in a situation of incredible scarcity where everyone’s fighting each other in a zero-sum game. So we should not be obsessed with making sure everyone contributes economically, but making sure that people feel good about themselves.

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I want to talk about the last chapter. It’s a very optimistic vision of plenitude and abundance. I’ve been thinking of scenarios from climate-change models that predict devastating physical impacts by 2041, with millions of refugees on the move. I have trouble harmonizing these two different ideas of the future. Did you think about climate change when you were working on that chapter?

Lee: Well, there are others who have written about the worst-case scenario. I would say what we wrote is a good-case scenario—I don’t think it’s the best case because there are still challenges and frustrations and things that are imperfect. I tried to target 80 percent good in the book. I think that’s the kind of optimism we need to counterbalance the dystopian narratives that are more prevalent.

The worst case for climate is horrible, but I see a few strong reasons for optimism. One is that green energy is quickly becoming economical. In the past, why didn’t people go for green energy? Because fossil fuels were cheaper and more convenient, so people gained for themselves and hurt the environment. The key thing that will turn it around is that, first, governments need to have catalyst policies such as subsidized electrical vehicles. That is the important first step. And then I think green energy needs to become economic. Now we’re at the point where, for example, solar plus lithium batteries, not even the most advanced batteries, are already becoming cheaper than fossil fuel. So there are reasons for optimism.

I liked that the book also got into philosophical questions like: What is happiness in the era of AI? Why did you want to get into that more abstract realm?

Lee: I think we need to slowly move away from obsession with money. Money as a metric of happiness and success is going to become more and more outdated, because we’re entering a world where there’s much greater plenitude. But what is the right metric? What does it really mean for us to be happy? We now know that having more money isn’t the answer, but what is the right answer?

AI has been used so far mainly to help large Internet companies make money. They use AI to show people videos in such a way that the company makes the most money. That’s what has led us to the current social media and streaming video that many people are unhappy about. But is there a way for AI to show people video and content so that they’re happier or more intelligent or more well liked? AI is a great tool, and it’s such a pity that it’s being used by large Internet companies that say, ‘How do we show people stuff so we make more money?” If we could have some definitions of happiness, well-likedness, intelligence, knowledgeableness of individuals, then we can turn AI into a tool of education and betterment for each of us individually in ways that are meaningful to us. This can be delivered using the same technology that is doing mostly monetization for large companies today.

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Match ID: 148 Score: 6.43 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 9 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google, 1.43 microsoft, 1.43 amazon

Andrew Ng: Unbiggen AI
Wed, 09 Feb 2022 15:31:12 +0000


Andrew Ng has serious street cred in artificial intelligence. He pioneered the use of graphics processing units (GPUs) to train deep learning models in the late 2000s with his students at Stanford University, cofounded Google Brain in 2011, and then served for three years as chief scientist for Baidu, where he helped build the Chinese tech giant’s AI group. So when he says he has identified the next big shift in artificial intelligence, people listen. And that’s what he told IEEE Spectrum in an exclusive Q&A.


Ng’s current efforts are focused on his company Landing AI, which built a platform called LandingLens to help manufacturers improve visual inspection with computer vision. He has also become something of an evangelist for what he calls the data-centric AI movement, which he says can yield “small data” solutions to big issues in AI, including model efficiency, accuracy, and bias.

Andrew Ng on...

The great advances in deep learning over the past decade or so have been powered by ever-bigger models crunching ever-bigger amounts of data. Some people argue that that’s an unsustainable trajectory. Do you agree that it can’t go on that way?

Andrew Ng: This is a big question. We’ve seen foundation models in NLP [natural language processing]. I’m excited about NLP models getting even bigger, and also about the potential of building foundation models in computer vision. I think there’s lots of signal to still be exploited in video: We have not been able to build foundation models yet for video because of compute bandwidth and the cost of processing video, as opposed to tokenized text. So I think that this engine of scaling up deep learning algorithms, which has been running for something like 15 years now, still has steam in it. Having said that, it only applies to certain problems, and there’s a set of other problems that need small data solutions.

When you say you want a foundation model for computer vision, what do you mean by that?

Ng: This is a term coined by Percy Liang and some of my friends at Stanford to refer to very large models, trained on very large data sets, that can be tuned for specific applications. For example, GPT-3 is an example of a foundation model [for NLP]. Foundation models offer a lot of promise as a new paradigm in developing machine learning applications, but also challenges in terms of making sure that they’re reasonably fair and free from bias, especially if many of us will be building on top of them.

What needs to happen for someone to build a foundation model for video?

Ng: I think there is a scalability problem. The compute power needed to process the large volume of images for video is significant, and I think that’s why foundation models have arisen first in NLP. Many researchers are working on this, and I think we’re seeing early signs of such models being developed in computer vision. But I’m confident that if a semiconductor maker gave us 10 times more processor power, we could easily find 10 times more video to build such models for vision.

Having said that, a lot of what’s happened over the past decade is that deep learning has happened in consumer-facing companies that have large user bases, sometimes billions of users, and therefore very large data sets. While that paradigm of machine learning has driven a lot of economic value in consumer software, I find that that recipe of scale doesn’t work for other industries.

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It’s funny to hear you say that, because your early work was at a consumer-facing company with millions of users.

Ng: Over a decade ago, when I proposed starting the Google Brain project to use Google’s compute infrastructure to build very large neural networks, it was a controversial step. One very senior person pulled me aside and warned me that starting Google Brain would be bad for my career. I think he felt that the action couldn’t just be in scaling up, and that I should instead focus on architecture innovation.

“In many industries where giant data sets simply don’t exist, I think the focus has to shift from big data to good data. Having 50 thoughtfully engineered examples can be sufficient to explain to the neural network what you want it to learn.”
—Andrew Ng, CEO & Founder, Landing AI

I remember when my students and I published the first NeurIPS workshop paper advocating using CUDA, a platform for processing on GPUs, for deep learning—a different senior person in AI sat me down and said, “CUDA is really complicated to program. As a programming paradigm, this seems like too much work.” I did manage to convince him; the other person I did not convince.

I expect they’re both convinced now.

Ng: I think so, yes.

Over the past year as I’ve been speaking to people about the data-centric AI movement, I’ve been getting flashbacks to when I was speaking to people about deep learning and scalability 10 or 15 years ago. In the past year, I’ve been getting the same mix of “there’s nothing new here” and “this seems like the wrong direction.”

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How do you define data-centric AI, and why do you consider it a movement?

Ng: Data-centric AI is the discipline of systematically engineering the data needed to successfully build an AI system. For an AI system, you have to implement some algorithm, say a neural network, in code and then train it on your data set. The dominant paradigm over the last decade was to download the data set while you focus on improving the code. Thanks to that paradigm, over the last decade deep learning networks have improved significantly, to the point where for a lot of applications the code—the neural network architecture—is basically a solved problem. So for many practical applications, it’s now more productive to hold the neural network architecture fixed, and instead find ways to improve the data.

When I started speaking about this, there were many practitioners who, completely appropriately, raised their hands and said, “Yes, we’ve been doing this for 20 years.” This is the time to take the things that some individuals have been doing intuitively and make it a systematic engineering discipline.

The data-centric AI movement is much bigger than one company or group of researchers. My collaborators and I organized a data-centric AI workshop at NeurIPS, and I was really delighted at the number of authors and presenters that showed up.

You often talk about companies or institutions that have only a small amount of data to work with. How can data-centric AI help them?

Ng: You hear a lot about vision systems built with millions of images—I once built a face recognition system using 350 million images. Architectures built for hundreds of millions of images don’t work with only 50 images. But it turns out, if you have 50 really good examples, you can build something valuable, like a defect-inspection system. In many industries where giant data sets simply don’t exist, I think the focus has to shift from big data to good data. Having 50 thoughtfully engineered examples can be sufficient to explain to the neural network what you want it to learn.

When you talk about training a model with just 50 images, does that really mean you’re taking an existing model that was trained on a very large data set and fine-tuning it? Or do you mean a brand new model that’s designed to learn only from that small data set?

Ng: Let me describe what Landing AI does. When doing visual inspection for manufacturers, we often use our own flavor of RetinaNet. It is a pretrained model. Having said that, the pretraining is a small piece of the puzzle. What’s a bigger piece of the puzzle is providing tools that enable the manufacturer to pick the right set of images [to use for fine-tuning] and label them in a consistent way. There’s a very practical problem we’ve seen spanning vision, NLP, and speech, where even human annotators don’t agree on the appropriate label. For big data applications, the common response has been: If the data is noisy, let’s just get a lot of data and the algorithm will average over it. But if you can develop tools that flag where the data’s inconsistent and give you a very targeted way to improve the consistency of the data, that turns out to be a more efficient way to get a high-performing system.

“Collecting more data often helps, but if you try to collect more data for everything, that can be a very expensive activity.”
—Andrew Ng

For example, if you have 10,000 images where 30 images are of one class, and those 30 images are labeled inconsistently, one of the things we do is build tools to draw your attention to the subset of data that’s inconsistent. So you can very quickly relabel those images to be more consistent, and this leads to improvement in performance.

Could this focus on high-quality data help with bias in data sets? If you’re able to curate the data more before training?

Ng: Very much so. Many researchers have pointed out that biased data is one factor among many leading to biased systems. There have been many thoughtful efforts to engineer the data. At the NeurIPS workshop, Olga Russakovsky gave a really nice talk on this. At the main NeurIPS conference, I also really enjoyed Mary Gray’s presentation, which touched on how data-centric AI is one piece of the solution, but not the entire solution. New tools like Datasheets for Datasets also seem like an important piece of the puzzle.

One of the powerful tools that data-centric AI gives us is the ability to engineer a subset of the data. Imagine training a machine-learning system and finding that its performance is okay for most of the data set, but its performance is biased for just a subset of the data. If you try to change the whole neural network architecture to improve the performance on just that subset, it’s quite difficult. But if you can engineer a subset of the data you can address the problem in a much more targeted way.

When you talk about engineering the data, what do you mean exactly?

Ng: In AI, data cleaning is important, but the way the data has been cleaned has often been in very manual ways. In computer vision, someone may visualize images through a Jupyter notebook and maybe spot the problem, and maybe fix it. But I’m excited about tools that allow you to have a very large data set, tools that draw your attention quickly and efficiently to the subset of data where, say, the labels are noisy. Or to quickly bring your attention to the one class among 100 classes where it would benefit you to collect more data. Collecting more data often helps, but if you try to collect more data for everything, that can be a very expensive activity.

For example, I once figured out that a speech-recognition system was performing poorly when there was car noise in the background. Knowing that allowed me to collect more data with car noise in the background, rather than trying to collect more data for everything, which would have been expensive and slow.

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What about using synthetic data, is that often a good solution?

Ng: I think synthetic data is an important tool in the tool chest of data-centric AI. At the NeurIPS workshop, Anima Anandkumar gave a great talk that touched on synthetic data. I think there are important uses of synthetic data that go beyond just being a preprocessing step for increasing the data set for a learning algorithm. I’d love to see more tools to let developers use synthetic data generation as part of the closed loop of iterative machine learning development.

Do you mean that synthetic data would allow you to try the model on more data sets?

Ng: Not really. Here’s an example. Let’s say you’re trying to detect defects in a smartphone casing. There are many different types of defects on smartphones. It could be a scratch, a dent, pit marks, discoloration of the material, other types of blemishes. If you train the model and then find through error analysis that it’s doing well overall but it’s performing poorly on pit marks, then synthetic data generation allows you to address the problem in a more targeted way. You could generate more data just for the pit-mark category.

“In the consumer software Internet, we could train a handful of machine-learning models to serve a billion users. In manufacturing, you might have 10,000 manufacturers building 10,000 custom AI models.”
—Andrew Ng

Synthetic data generation is a very powerful tool, but there are many simpler tools that I will often try first. Such as data augmentation, improving labeling consistency, or just asking a factory to collect more data.

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To make these issues more concrete, can you walk me through an example? When a company approaches Landing AI and says it has a problem with visual inspection, how do you onboard them and work toward deployment?

Ng: When a customer approaches us we usually have a conversation about their inspection problem and look at a few images to verify that the problem is feasible with computer vision. Assuming it is, we ask them to upload the data to the LandingLens platform. We often advise them on the methodology of data-centric AI and help them label the data.

One of the foci of Landing AI is to empower manufacturing companies to do the machine learning work themselves. A lot of our work is making sure the software is fast and easy to use. Through the iterative process of machine learning development, we advise customers on things like how to train models on the platform, when and how to improve the labeling of data so the performance of the model improves. Our training and software supports them all the way through deploying the trained model to an edge device in the factory.

How do you deal with changing needs? If products change or lighting conditions change in the factory, can the model keep up?

Ng: It varies by manufacturer. There is data drift in many contexts. But there are some manufacturers that have been running the same manufacturing line for 20 years now with few changes, so they don’t expect changes in the next five years. Those stable environments make things easier. For other manufacturers, we provide tools to flag when there’s a significant data-drift issue. I find it really important to empower manufacturing customers to correct data, retrain, and update the model. Because if something changes and it’s 3 a.m. in the United States, I want them to be able to adapt their learning algorithm right away to maintain operations.

In the consumer software Internet, we could train a handful of machine-learning models to serve a billion users. In manufacturing, you might have 10,000 manufacturers building 10,000 custom AI models. The challenge is, how do you do that without Landing AI having to hire 10,000 machine learning specialists?

So you’re saying that to make it scale, you have to empower customers to do a lot of the training and other work.

Ng: Yes, exactly! This is an industry-wide problem in AI, not just in manufacturing. Look at health care. Every hospital has its own slightly different format for electronic health records. How can every hospital train its own custom AI model? Expecting every hospital’s IT personnel to invent new neural-network architectures is unrealistic. The only way out of this dilemma is to build tools that empower the customers to build their own models by giving them tools to engineer the data and express their domain knowledge. That’s what Landing AI is executing in computer vision, and the field of AI needs other teams to execute this in other domains.

Is there anything else you think it’s important for people to understand about the work you’re doing or the data-centric AI movement?

Ng: In the last decade, the biggest shift in AI was a shift to deep learning. I think it’s quite possible that in this decade the biggest shift will be to data-centric AI. With the maturity of today’s neural network architectures, I think for a lot of the practical applications the bottleneck will be whether we can efficiently get the data we need to develop systems that work well. The data-centric AI movement has tremendous energy and momentum across the whole community. I hope more researchers and developers will jump in and work on it.

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This article appears in the April 2022 print issue as “Andrew Ng, AI Minimalist.”


Match ID: 149 Score: 6.43 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 101 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google, 1.43 microsoft, 1.43 development

Spin Me Up, Scotty—Up Into Orbit
Fri, 21 Jan 2022 16:34:49 +0000


At first, the dream of riding a rocket into space was laughed off the stage by critics who said you’d have to carry along fuel that weighed more than the rocket itself. But the advent of booster rockets and better fuels let the dreamers have the last laugh.

Hah, the critics said: To put a kilogram of payload into orbit we just need 98 kilograms of rocket plus rocket fuel.

What a ratio, what a cost. To transport a kilogram of cargo, commercial air freight services typically charge about US $10; spaceflight costs reach $10,000. Sure, you can save money by reusing the booster, as Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos are trying to do, but it would be so much better if you could dispense with the booster and shoot the payload straight into space.

The first people to think along these lines used cannon launchers, such as those in Project HARP (High Altitude Research Project), in the 1960s. Research support dried up after booster rockets showed their mettle. Another idea was to shoot payloads into orbit along a gigantic electrified ramp, called a railgun, but that technology still faces hurdles of a basic scientific nature, not least the need for massive banks of capacitors to provide the jolt of energy.

Imagine a satellite spinning in a vacuum chamber at many times the speed of sound. The gates of that chamber open up, and the satellite shoots out faster than the air outside can rush back in—creating a sonic boom when it hits the wall of air.

Now SpinLaunch, a company founded in 2015 in Long Beach, Calif., proposes a gentler way to heave satellites into orbit. Rather than shoot the satellite in a gun, SpinLaunch would sling it from the end of a carbon-fiber tether that spins around in a vacuum chamber for as long as an hour before reaching terminal speed. The tether lets go milliseconds before gates in the chamber open up to allow the satellite out.

“Because we’re slowly accelerating the system, we can keep the power demands relatively low,” David Wrenn, vice president for technology, tells IEEE Spectrum. “And as there’s a certain amount of energy stored in the tether itself, you can recapture that through regenerative braking.”

The company reports they've raised about $100 million. Among the backers are the investment arms of Airbus and Google and the Defense Innovation Unit, part of the U.S. Department of Defense.

SpinLaunch began with a lab centrifuge that measures about 12 meters in diameter. In November, a 33-meter version at Space Port America test-launched a payload thousands of meters up. Such a system could loft a small rocket, which would finish the job of reaching orbit. A 100-meter version, now in the planning stage, should be able to handle a 200-kg payload.

Wrenn answers all the obvious questions. How can the tether withstand the g-force when spinning at hypersonic speed? “A carbon-fiber cable with a cross-sectional area of one square inch (6.5 square centimeters) can suspend a mass of 300,000 pounds (136,000 kg),” he says.

How much preparation do you need between shots? Not much, because the chamber doesn’t have to be superclean. If the customer wants to loft a lot of satellites—a likely desideratum, given the trend toward massive constellations of small satellites–the setup could include motors powerful enough to spin up in 30 minutes. “Upwards of 10 launches per day are possible,” Wrenn says.

How tight must the vacuum be? A “rough” vacuum suffices, he says. SpinLaunch maintains the vacuum with a system of airlocks operated by those millisecond-fast gates.

Most parts, including the steel for the vacuum chamber and carbon fiber, are off-the-shelf, but those gates are proprietary. All Wrenn will say is that they’re not made of steel.

So imagine a highly intricate communications satellite, housed in some structure, spinning at many times the speed of sound. The gates open up, the satellite shoots out far faster than the air outside can rush back in. Then the satellite hits the wall of air, creating a sonic boom.

No problem, says Wrenn. Electronic systems have been hurtling from vacuums into air ever since the cannon-launching days of HARP, some 60 years ago. SpinLaunch has done work already on engineering certain satellite components to withstand the ordeal—“deployable solar panels, for example,” he says.

After the online version of this article appeared, several readers objected to the SpinLaunch system, above all to the stress it would put on the liquid-fueled rocket at the end of that carbon-fiber tether.

“The system has to support up to 8,000 gs; most payloads at launch are rated at 6 or 10 gs,” said John Bucknell, a rocket scientist who heads the startup Virtus Solis Technologies, which aims to collect solar energy in space and beam it to earth.

Keith Lostrom, a chip engineer, went even further. “Drop a brick onto an egg—that is a tiny fraction of the damage that SpinLaunch’s centripedal acceleration would do to a liquid-fuel orbital launch rocket,” he wrote, in an emailed message.

Wrenn denies that the g-force is a dealbreaker. For one thing, he argues, the turbopumps in liquid-fuel rockets spin at over 30,000 rotations per minute, subjecting the liquid oxygen and fuel to “much more aggressive conditions than the uniform g-force that SpinLaunch has.”

Besides, he says, finite element analysis and high-g testing in the company’s 12-meter accelerator “has led to confidence it’s not a fundamental issue for us. We’ve already hot-fired our SpinLaunch-compatible upper-stage engine on the test stand.”

SpinLaunch says it will announce the site for its full-scale orbital launcher within the next five months. It will likely be built on a coastline, far from populated areas and regular airplane service. Construction costs would be held down if the machine can be built up the side of a hill. If all goes well, expect to see the first satellite slung into orbit sometime around 2025.

This article was updated on 24 Feb. 2022 to include additional perspectives on the technology.


Match ID: 150 Score: 6.43 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 120 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google, 2.14 musk, 0.71 startup

Tamal Ray’s recipe for grilled aubergine salad
Sat, 21 May 2022 12:00:19 GMT

Aubergines grilled with oil and cumin, and served alongside roast grapes, feta, croutons and balsamic vinegar

It took me a while to love aubergines. As a child, my palate couldn’t appreciate my mum’s begun bhaja, a simple Bengali preparation of fried aubergines with turmeric and salt. “They’re too slimy!” I’d wail as she rolled her eyes and served them to less ungrateful members of the family. Years later, I rediscovered them through the myriad ways they appear in Middle Eastern food: stuffed and grilled and turned into delicious dips. And, in cooking them myself, I learned to love them in Indian cuisine, too – even the dreaded begun bhaja of my youth.

UK readers: click to buy these ingredients from Ocado

Continue reading...
Match ID: 151 Score: 5.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 5.00 uber

Uber Driver Charges Newly Freed Martin Shkreli Three Hundred Times Normal Rate
Thu, 19 May 2022 14:13:07 +0000
The driver said that he jacked up the price once he recognized the notorious “pharma bro,” sending the cost of the twelve-dollar fare rocketing to thirty-six hundred dollars.
Match ID: 152 Score: 5.00 source: www.newyorker.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 5.00 uber

Puzzling Out the Drone War Over Ukraine
Fri, 25 Mar 2022 12:26:23 +0000


In 2014, Ukrainian soldiers fighting in Crimea knew that the sight of Russian drones would soon be followed by a heavy barrage of Russian artillery. During that war, the Russian military integrated drones into tactical missions, using them to hunt for Ukrainian forces, whom they then pounded with artillery and cannon fire. Russian drones weren’t as advanced as those of their Western counterparts, but the Russian military’s integration of drones into its battlefield tactics was second to none.

Eight years later, the Russians are again invading Ukraine. And since the earlier incursion, the Russian military has spent approximately US $9 billion to domestically produce an armada of some 500 drones (a.k.a. unmanned aerial vehicles, or UAVs). But, astonishingly, three weeks into this invasion, the Russians have not had anywhere near their previous level of success with their drones. There are even signs that in the drone war, the Ukrainians have an edge over the Russians.

How could the drone capabilities of these two militaries have experienced such differing fortunes over the same period? The answer lies in a combination of trade embargoes, tech development, and the rising importance of countermeasures.

Since 2014’s invasion of Crimea, Russia’s drone-development efforts have lagged—during a time of dynamic evolution and development across the UAV industry.

First, some background. Military drones come in a wide variety of sizes, purposes, and capabilities, but they can be grouped into a few categories. On one end of the spectrum are relatively tiny flying bombs, small enough to be carried in a rucksack. On the other end are high-altitude drones, with wingspans up to 25 meters and capable of staying aloft for 30 or 40 hours, of being operated from consoles thousands of kilometers from the battlefield, and of firing air-to-surface missiles with deadly precision. In between are a range of intermediate-size drones used primarily for surveillance and reconnaissance.

Russia’s fleet of drones includes models in each of these categories. However, sanctions imposed after the 2014 invasion of Crimea blocked the Russian military from procuring some key technologies necessary to stay on the cutting edge of drone development, particularly in optics, lightweight composites, and electronics. With relatively limited capabilities of its own in these areas, Russia’s drone development efforts became somewhat sluggish during a time of dynamic evolution and development elsewhere.

Current stalwarts in the Russian arsenal include the Zala Kyb, which is a “loitering munition” that can dive into a target and explode. The most common Russian drones are midsize ones used for surveillance and reconnaissance. These include the Eleron-3SV and the Orlan-10 drones, both of which have been used extensively in Syria and Ukraine. In fact, just last week, an Orlan-10 operator was awarded a military medal for locating a site from which Ukrainian soldiers were ambushing Russian tanks, and also a Ukrainian basing area outside Kyiv containing ten artillery pieces, which were subsequently destroyed. Russia’s only large, missile-firing drone is the Kronshtadt Orion, which is similar to the American MQ-1 Predator and can be used for precision strikes as well as reconnaissance. An Orion was credited with an air strike on a command center in Ukraine in early March 2022.

Meanwhile, since the 2014 Crimea war, when they had no drones at all, the Ukrainians have methodically assembled a modest but highly capable set of drones. The backbone of the fleet, with some 300 units fielded, are the A1-SM Fury and the Leleka-100 reconnaissance drones, both designed and manufactured in Ukraine. The A1-SM Fury entered service in April 2020, and the Leleka-100, in May, 2021.

On offense, the Ukrainian and Russian militaries are closely matched in the drone war. The difference is on defense.

The heavy hitter for Ukraine in this war, though, is the Bayraktar TB2 drone, a combat aerial flyer with a wingspan of 12 meters and an armament of four laser-guided bombs. As of the beginning of March, and after losing two TB2s to Russian-backed separatist forces in Lugansk, Ukraine had a complement of 30 of the drones, which were designed and developed in Turkey. These drones are specifically aimed at destroying tanks and as of 24 March had been credited with destroying 26 vehicles, 10 surface-to-air missile systems, and 3 command posts. Various reports have put the cost of a TB2 at anywhere from $1 million to $10 million. It’s much cheaper than the tens of millions fetched for better-known combat drones, such as the MQ-9 Reaper, the backbone of the U.S. Air Force’s fleet of combat drones.

The Ukrainian arsenal also includes the Tu-141 reconnaissance drones, which are large, high-altitude Soviet-era drones that have had little success in the war. At the small end of the Ukraine drone complement are 100 Switchblade drones, which were donated by the United States as part of the $800 million weapons package announced on 16 March. The Switchblades are loitering munitions similar in size and functionality to the Russian Zala Kyb.

The upshot is that on offense, the Ukrainian and Russian militaries are closely matched in the drone war. The difference is on defense: Ukraine has the advantage when it comes to counter-drone technology. A decade ago, counter-drone technology mostly meant using radar to detect drones and surface-to-air missiles to shoot them down. It quickly proved far too costly and ineffective. Drone technology advanced at a brisk pace over the past decade, so counter-drone technology had to move rapidly to keep up. In Russia, it didn’t. Here, again, the Russian military was hampered by technology embargoes and a domestic industrial base that has been somewhat stagnant and lacking in critical capabilities. For contrast, the combined industrial base of the countries supporting Ukraine in this war is massive and has invested heavily in counter-drone technology.

Russia has deployed electronic warfare systems to counter enemy drones and have likely been using the Borisoglebsk 2 MT-LB and R-330Zh Zhitel systems, which use a combination of jamming and spoofing. These systems fill the air with radio-frequency energy, increasing the noise threshold to such a level that the drone cannot distinguish control signals from the remote pilot. Another standard counterdrone technique is sending false signals to the drone, with the most common being fake (“spoofed”) GPS signals, which disorient the flyer. Jamming and spoofing systems are easy to target because they emit radio-frequency waves at fairly high intensities. In fact, open-source images show that Ukrainian forces have already destroyed three of these Russian counterdrone systems.

The exact systems that have been provided to the Ukrainians is not publicly known, but it’s possible to make an educated guess from among the many systems available.

Additionally, some of the newer drones being used by the Ukrainians include features to withstand such electronic attacks. For example, when one of these drones detects a jamming signal, it switches to frequencies that are not being jammed; if it is still unable to reestablish a connection, the drone operates autonomously with a series of preset maneuvers until a connection can be reestablished.

Meanwhile, Ukraine has access to the wide array of NATO counterdrone technologies. The exact systems that have been provided to the Ukrainians is not publicly known, but it’s possible to make an educated guess from among the many systems available. One of the more powerful ones, from Lockheed Martin, repurposes a solid-state, phased-array radar system developed to spot incoming munitions, to detect and identify a drone. The system then tracks the drone and uses high-energy lasers to shoot it down. Raytheon’s counterdrone portfolio includes similar capabilities along with drone-killing drones and systems capable of beaming high-power microwaves that disrupt the drone’s electronics.

While most major Western defense contractors have some sort of counterdrone system, there has also been significant innovation in the commercial sector, given the mass proliferation of commercial drones. While many of these technologies are aimed at smaller drones, some of the technologies, including acoustic sensing and radio-frequency localization, are effective against larger drones as well. Also, a dozen small companies have developed jamming and spoofing systems specifically aimed at countering modern drones.

Although we don’t know specifically which counterdrone systems are being deployed by the Ukrainians, the images of the destroyed drones tell a compelling story. In the drone war, many of the flyers on both sides have been captured or destroyed on the ground, but more than half were disabled while in flight. The destroyed Ukrainian drones often show tremendous damage, including burn marks and other signs that they were shot down by a Russian surface-to-air missile. A logical conclusion is that the Russians’ electronic counterdrone systems were not effective. Meanwhile, the downed Russian drones are typically much more intact, showing relatively minor damage consistent with a precision strike from a laser or electromagnetic pulse. This is exactly what you would expect if the drones had been dispatched by one of the newer Western counterdrone systems.

In the first three weeks of this conflict, Russian drones have failed to achieve the level of success that they did in 2014. The Ukrainians, on the other hand, have logged multiple victories with drone and counterdrone forces assembled in just 8 years. The Russian drones, primarily domestically sourced, have been foiled repeatedly by NATO counterdrone technology. Meanwhile, the Ukrainian drones, such as the TB2s procured from NATO-member Turkey, have had multiple successes against the Russian counterdrone systems.
Match ID: 153 Score: 5.00 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 57 days
qualifiers: 3.57 trade, 1.43 development

ProWritingAid VS Grammarly: Which Grammar Checker is Better in (2022) ?
Sun, 13 Mar 2022 15:04:00 +0000

Grammarly vs prowritingaid

ProWritingAid VS Grammarly:  When it comes to English grammar, there are two Big Players that everyone knows of: the Grammarly and ProWritingAid. but you are wondering which one to choose so here we write a detail article which will help you to choose the best one for you so Let's start

What is Grammarly?

Grammarly is a tool that checks for grammatical errors, spelling, and punctuation.it gives you comprehensive feedback on your writing. You can use this tool to proofread and edit articles, blog posts, emails, etc.

Grammarly also detects all types of mistakes, including sentence structure issues and misused words. It also gives you suggestions on style changes, punctuation, spelling, and grammar all are in real-time. The free version covers the basics like identifying grammar and spelling mistakes

whereas the Premium version offers a lot more functionality, it detects plagiarism in your content, suggests word choice, or adds fluency to it.


Features of Grammarly

  • Spelling and Word Suggestion: Grammarly detects basic to advance grammatical errors and also help you why this is an error and suggest to you how you can improve it
  • Create a Personal Dictionary: The Grammarly app allows you to add words to your personal dictionary so that the same mistake isn't highlighted every time you run Grammarly.
  • Different English Style: Check to spell for American, British, Canadian, and Australian English.
  • Plagiarism: This feature helps you detect if a text has been plagiarized by comparing it with over eight billion web pages.
  • Wordiness: This tool will help you check your writing for long and hard-to-read sentences. It also shows you how to shorten sentences so that they are more concise.
  • Passive Voice: The program also notifies users when passive voice is used too frequently in a document.
  • Punctuations: This feature flags all incorrect and missing punctuation.
  • Repetition: The tool provides recommendations for replacing the repeated word.
  • Proposition: Grammarly identifies misplaced and confused prepositions.

  • Plugins: It offers Microsoft Word, Microsoft Outlook, and Google Chrome plugins.


What is ProWritingAid?

ProWritingAid is a style and grammar checker for content creators and writers. It helps to optimize word choice, punctuation errors, and common grammar mistakes, providing detailed reports to help you improve your writing. 

ProWritingAid can be used as an add-on to WordPress, Gmail, and Google Docs. The software also offers helpful articles, videos, quizzes, and explanations to help improve your writing.

Features of ProWriting Aid

Here are some key features of ProWriting Aid:

  • Grammar checker and spell checker: This tool helps you to find all grammatical and spelling errors.
  • Find repeated words:  The tool also allows you to search for repeated words and phrases in your content.
  • Context-sensitive style suggestions:  You can find the exact style of writing you intend and suggest if it flows well in your writing.
  • Check the readability of your content: Pro Writing Aid helps you identify the strengths and weaknesses of your article by pointing out difficult sentences and paragraphs.
  • Sentence Length: It also indicates the length of your sentences.
  • Check Grammatical error: It also checks your work for any grammatical errors or typos, as well.
  • Overused words: As a writer, you might find yourself using the same word repeatedly. ProWritingAid's overused words checker helps you avoid this lazy writing mistake.
  • Consistency: Check your work for inconsistent usage of open and closed quotation marks.
  • Echoes: Check your writing for uniformly repetitive words and phrases.

Difference between Grammarly and Pro-Writing Aid

Grammarly and ProWritingAid are well-known grammar-checking software. However, if you're like most people who can't decide which to use, here are some different points that may be helpful in your decision.

Grammarly vs ProWritingAid

  • Grammarly is a writing enhancement tool that offers suggestions for grammar, vocabulary, and syntax whereas ProWritingAid offers world-class grammar and style checking, as well as advanced reports to help you strengthen your writing.
  • Grammarly provides Android and IOS apps whereas ProWritingAid doesn't have a mobile or IOS app.
  • Grammarly offers important suggestions about mistakes you've made whereas ProWritingAid  shows more suggestions than Grammarly but all recommendations are not accurate
  • Grammarly has a more friendly UI/UX whereas the ProWritingAid interface is not friendly as Grammarly.
  • Grammarly is an accurate grammar checker for non-fiction writing whereas ProWritingAid is an accurate grammar checker for fiction writers.
  • Grammarly finds grammar and punctuation mistakes, whereas ProWritingAid identifies run-on sentences and fragments.
  • Grammarly provides 24/7 support via submitting a ticket and sending emails. ProWritingAid’s support team is available via email, though the response time is approximately 48 hours.
  • Grammarly offers many features in its free plan, whereas ProWritingAid offers some basic features in the free plan.
  • Grammarly does not offer much feedback on big picture writing; ProWritingAid offers complete feedback on big picture writing.
  • Grammarly is a better option for accuracy, whereas ProWritingAid is better for handling fragmented sentences and dialogue. It can be quite useful for fiction writers.

ProWritingAid VS Grammarly: Pricing Difference

  • ProWritingAid comes with three pricing structures. The full-year cost of ProWritingAid is $79, while its lifetime plans cost $339. You also can opt for a monthly plan of $20.
  • Grammarly offers a Premium subscription for $30/month for a monthly plan  $20/month for quarterly and $12/month for an annual subscription.
  • The Business plan costs $12.50 per month for each member of your company.

ProWritingAid vs Grammarly – Pros and Cons

Grammarly Pros

  • It allows you to fix common mistakes like grammar and spelling.
  • Offers most features in the free plan
  • Allows you to edit a document without affecting the formatting.
  • Active and passive voice checker
  • Personal dictionary 
  • Plagiarism checker (paid version)
  • Proofread your writing and correct all punctuation, grammar, and spelling errors.
  • Allows you to make changes to a document without altering its formatting.
  • Helps users improve vocabulary
  • User-friendly interface
  • Browser extensions and MS word add-ons
  • Available on all major devices and platforms
  • Grammarly will also offer suggestions to improve your style.
  • Enhance the readability of your sentence
  • Free mobile apps 
  • Offers  free version

Grammarly Cons

  • Supports only English 
  • Customer support only via email
  • Limits to 150,000 words
  • Subscription plans can be a bit pricey 
  • Plagiarism checker is only available in a premium plan
  • Doesn’t offer a free trial
  • No refund policy
  • The free version is ideal for basic spelling and grammatical mistakes, but it does not correct advanced writing issues.
  • Some features are not available for Mac.

ProwritingAid Pros

  • It offers more than 20 different reports to help you improve your writing.
  • Less expensive than other grammar checkers.
  • This tool helps you strengthen your writing style as it offers big-picture feedback.
  • ProWritingAid has a life plan with no further payments required.
  • Compatible with Google Docs!
  • Prowritingaid works on both Windows and Mac.
  • They offer more integrations than most tools.

ProWritingAid Cons

  • Editing can be a little more time-consuming when you add larger passages of text.
  • ProWritingAid currently offers no mobile app for Android or iOS devices.
  • Plagiarism checker is only available in premium plans.
  • All recommendations are not accurate

Summarizing the Ginger VS Grammarly: My Recommendation

As both writing assistants are great in their own way, you need to choose the one that suits you best.

  • For example, go for Grammarly  if you are a non-fiction writer
  • Go for ProWritingAid if you are a fiction writer.
  • ProWritingAid is better at catching errors found in long-form content. However, Grammarly is more suited to short blog posts and other similar tasks.
  • ProWritingAid helps you clean up your writing by checking for style, structure, and content while Grammarly focuses on grammar and punctuation.
  • Grammarly has a more friendly UI/UX whereas; ProWritingAid offers complete feedback on big picture writing.

Both ProWritingAid and Grammarly are awesome writing tools, without a doubt. but as per my experience, Grammarly is a winner here because Grammarly helps you to review and edit your content. Grammarly highlights all the mistakes in your writing within seconds of copying and pasting the content into Grammarly’s editor or using the software’s native feature in other text editors.

Not only does it identify tiny grammatical and spelling errors, it tells you when you overlook punctuations where they are needed. And, beyond its plagiarism-checking capabilities, Grammarly helps you proofread your content. Even better, the software offers a free plan that gives you access to some of its features.




Match ID: 154 Score: 5.00 source: www.crunchhype.com age: 69 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google, 1.43 microsoft

Ahrefs vs SEMrush: Which SEO Tool Should You Use?
Tue, 01 Mar 2022 12:16:00 +0000
semrush vs ahrefs


SEMrush and Ahrefs are among the most popular tools in the SEO industry. Both companies have been in business for years and have thousands of customers per month.

If you're a professional SEO or trying to do digital marketing on your own, at some point you'll likely consider using a tool to help with your efforts. Ahrefs and SEMrush are two names that will likely appear on your shortlist.

In this guide, I'm going to help you learn more about these SEO tools and how to choose the one that's best for your purposes.

What is SEMrush?

semrush

SEMrush is a popular SEO tool with a wide range of features—it's the leading competitor research service for online marketers. SEMrush's SEO Keyword Magic tool offers over 20 billion Google-approved keywords, which are constantly updated and it's the largest keyword database.

The program was developed in 2007 as SeoQuake is a small Firefox extension

Features

  • Most accurate keyword data: Accurate keyword search volume data is crucial for SEO and PPC campaigns by allowing you to identify what keywords are most likely to bring in big sales from ad clicks. SEMrush constantly updates its databases and provides the most accurate data.
  • Largest Keyword database: SEMrush's Keyword Magic Tool now features 20-billion keywords, providing marketers and SEO professionals the largest database of keywords.

  • All SEMrush users receive daily ranking data, mobile volume information, and the option to buy additional keywords by default with no additional payment or add-ons needed
  • Most accurate position tracking tool: This tool provides all subscribers with basic tracking capabilities, making it suitable for SEO professionals. Plus, the Position Tracking tool provides local-level data to everyone who uses the tool.
  • SEO Data Management: SEMrush makes managing your online data easy by allowing you to create visually appealing custom PDF reports, including Branded and White Label reports, report scheduling, and integration with GA, GMB, and GSC.
  • Toxic link monitoring and penalty recovery: With SEMrush, you can make a detailed analysis of toxic backlinks, toxic scores, toxic markers, and outreach to those sites.
  • Content Optimization and Creation Tools: SEMrush offers content optimization and creation tools that let you create SEO-friendly content. Some features include the SEO Writing Assistant, On-Page SEO Check, er/SEO Content Template, Content Audit, Post Tracking, Brand Monitoring.

Ahrefs

ahrefs


Ahrefs is a leading SEO platform that offers a set of tools to grow your search traffic, research your competitors, and monitor your niche. The company was founded in 2010, and it has become a popular choice among SEO tools. Ahrefs has a keyword index of over 10.3 billion keywords and offers accurate and extensive backlink data updated every 15-30 minutes and it is the world's most extensive backlink index database.

Features

  • Backlink alerts data and new keywords: Get an alert when your site is linked to or discussed in blogs, forums, comments, or when new keywords are added to a blog posting about you.
  • Intuitive interface: The intuitive design of the widget helps you see the overall health of your website and search engine ranking at a glance.
  • Site Explorer: The Site Explorer will give you an in-depth look at your site's search traffic.
  • Domain Comparison
  • Reports with charts and graphs
  • JavaScript rendering and a site audit can identify SEO issues.
  • A question explorer that provides well-crafted topic suggestions

Direct Comparisons: Ahrefs vs SEMrush

Now that you know a little more about each tool, let's take a look at how they compare. I'll analyze each tool to see how they differ in interfaces, keyword research resources, rank tracking, and competitor analysis.

User Interface

Ahrefs and SEMrush both offer comprehensive information and quick metrics regarding your website's SEO performance. However, Ahrefs takes a bit more of a hands-on approach to getting your account fully set up, whereas SEMrush's simpler dashboard can give you access to the data you need quickly.

In this section, we provide a brief overview of the elements found on each dashboard and highlight the ease with which you can complete tasks.

AHREFS

ahrefs interface


The Ahrefs dashboard is less cluttered than that of SEMrush, and its primary menu is at the very top of the page, with a search bar designed only for entering URLs.

Additional features of the Ahrefs platform include:

  • You can see analytics from the dashboard, including search engine rankings to domain ratings, referring domains, and backlink
  • Jumping from one tool to another is easy. You can use the Keyword Explorer to find a keyword to target and then directly track your ranking with one click.
  • The website offers a tooltip helper tool that allows you to hover your mouse over something that isn't clear and get an in-depth explanation.

SEMRUSH

semrush domain overview


When you log into the SEMrush Tool, you will find four main modules. These include information about your domains, organic keyword analysis, ad keyword, and site traffic.

You'll also find some other options like

  • A search bar allows you to enter a domain, keyword, or anything else you wish to explore.
  • A menu on the left side of the page provides quick links to relevant information, including marketing insights, projects, keyword analytics, and more.
  • The customer support resources located directly within the dashboard can be used to communicate with the support team or to learn about other resources such as webinars and blogs.
  • Detailed descriptions of every resource offered. This detail is beneficial for new marketers, who are just starting.

WHO WINS?

Both Ahrefs and SEMrush have user-friendly dashboards, but Ahrefs is less cluttered and easier to navigate. On the other hand, SEMrush offers dozens of extra tools, including access to customer support resources.

When deciding on which dashboard to use, consider what you value in the user interface, and test out both.

Rank Tracking

If you're looking to track your website's search engine ranking, rank tracking features can help. You can also use them to monitor your competitors.

Let's take a look at Ahrefs vs. SEMrush to see which tool does a better job.

Ahrefs

ahrefs rank tracking


The Ahrefs Rank Tracker is simpler to use. Just type in the domain name and keywords you want to analyze, and it spits out a report showing you the search engine results page (SERP) ranking for each keyword you enter.

Rank Tracker looks at the ranking performance of keywords and compares them with the top rankings for those keywords. Ahrefs also offers:

You'll see metrics that help you understand your visibility, traffic, average position, and keyword difficulty.

It gives you an idea of whether a keyword would be profitable to target or not.

SEMRUSH

semrush position tracking


SEMRush offers a tool called Position Tracking. This tool is a project tool—you must set it up as a new project. Below are a few of the most popular features of the SEMrush Position Tracking tool:

All subscribers are given regular data updates and mobile search rankings upon subscribing

The platform provides opportunities to track several SERP features, including Local tracking.

Intuitive reports allow you to track statistics for the pages on your website, as well as the keywords used in those pages.

Identify pages that may be competing with each other using the Cannibalization report.

WHO WINS?

Ahrefs is a more user-friendly option. It takes seconds to enter a domain name and keywords. From there, you can quickly decide whether to proceed with that keyword or figure out how to rank better for other keywords.

SEMrush allows you to check your mobile rankings and ranking updates daily, which is something Ahrefs does not offer. SEMrush also offers social media rankings, a tool you won't find within the Ahrefs platform. Both are good which one do you like let me know in the comment.

Keyword Research

Keyword research is closely related to rank tracking, but it's used for deciding which keywords you plan on using for future content rather than those you use now.

When it comes to SEO, keyword research is the most important thing to consider when comparing the two platforms.

AHREFS



The Ahrefs Keyword Explorer provides you with thousands of keyword ideas and filters search results based on the chosen search engine.

Ahrefs supports several features, including:

  • It can search multiple keywords in a single search and analyze them together. At SEMrush, you also have this feature in Keyword Overview.
  • Ahrefs has a variety of keywords for different search engines, including Google, YouTube, Amazon, Bing, Yahoo, Yandex, and other search engines.
  • When you click on a keyword, you can see its search volume and keyword difficulty, but also other keywords related to it, which you didn't use.

SEMRUSH



SEMrush's Keyword Magic Tool has over 20 billion keywords for Google. You can type in any keyword you want, and a list of suggested keywords will appear.

The Keyword Magic Tool also lets you to:

  • Show performance metrics by keyword
  • Search results are based on both broad and exact keyword matches.
  • Show data like search volume, trends, keyword difficulty, and CPC.
  • Show the first 100 Google search results for any keyword.
  • Identify SERP Features and Questions related to each keyword
  • SEMrush has released a new Keyword Gap Tool that uncovers potentially useful keyword opportunities for you, including both paid and organic keywords.

WHO WINS?

Both of these tools offer keyword research features and allow users to break down complicated tasks into something that can be understood by beginners and advanced users alike.

If you're interested in keyword suggestions, SEMrush appears to have more keyword suggestions than Ahrefs does. It also continues to add new features, like the Keyword Gap tool and SERP Questions recommendations.

Competitor Analysis

Both platforms offer competitor analysis tools, eliminating the need to come up with keywords off the top of your head. Each tool is useful for finding keywords that will be useful for your competition so you know they will be valuable to you.

AHREFS



Ahrefs' domain comparison tool lets you compare up to five websites (your website and four competitors) side-by-side.it also shows you how your site is ranked against others with metrics such as backlinks, domain ratings, and more.

Use the Competing Domains section to see a list of your most direct competitors, and explore how many keywords matches your competitors have.

To find more information about your competitor, you can look at the Site Explorer and Content Explorer tools and type in their URL instead of yours.

SEMRUSH



SEMrush provides a variety of insights into your competitors' marketing tactics. The platform enables you to research your competitors effectively. It also offers several resources for competitor analysis including:

Traffic Analytics helps you identify where your audience comes from, how they engage with your site, what devices visitors use to view your site, and how your audiences overlap with other websites.

SEMrush's Organic Research examines your website's major competitors and shows their organic search rankings, keywords they are ranking for, and even if they are ranking for any (SERP) features and more.

The Market Explorer search field allows you to type in a domain and lists websites or articles similar to what you entered. Market Explorer also allows users to perform in-depth data analytics on These companies and markets.

WHO WINS?

SEMrush wins here because it has more tools dedicated to competitor analysis than Ahrefs. However, Ahrefs offers a lot of functionality in this area, too. It takes a combination of both tools to gain an advantage over your competition.

Pricing

Ahrefs

  • Lite Monthly: $99/month
  • Standard Monthly: $179/month
  • Annually Lite: $990/year
  • Annually Standard: $1790/year

SEMRUSH

  • Pro Plan: $119.95/month
  • Guru Plan:$229.95/month
  • Business Plan: $449.95/month

Which SEO tool should you choose for digital marketing?

When it comes to keyword data research, you will become confused about which one to choose.

Consider choosing Ahrefs if you

  • Like friendly and clean interface
  • Searching for simple keyword suggestions

  • Want to get more keywords for different search engines like Amazon, Bing, Yahoo, Yandex, Baidu, and more

 

Consider SEMrush if you:

  • Want more marketing and SEO features
  • Need competitor analysis tool
  • Need to keep your backlinks profile clean
  • Looking for more keyword suggestions for Google

Both tools are great. Choose the one which meets your requirements and if you have any experience using either Ahrefs or SEMrush let me know in the comment section which works well for you.

 

 


Match ID: 155 Score: 5.00 source: www.crunchhype.com age: 81 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google, 1.43 amazon

Atomically Thin Materials Significantly Shrink Qubits
Mon, 07 Feb 2022 16:12:05 +0000


Quantum computing is a devilishly complex technology, with many technical hurdles impacting its development. Of these challenges two critical issues stand out: miniaturization and qubit quality.

IBM has adopted the superconducting qubit road map of reaching a 1,121-qubit processor by 2023, leading to the expectation that 1,000 qubits with today’s qubit form factor is feasible. However, current approaches will require very large chips (50 millimeters on a side, or larger) at the scale of small wafers, or the use of chiplets on multichip modules. While this approach will work, the aim is to attain a better path toward scalability.

Now researchers at MIT have been able to both reduce the size of the qubits and done so in a way that reduces the interference that occurs between neighboring qubits. The MIT researchers have increased the number of superconducting qubits that can be added onto a device by a factor of 100.

“We are addressing both qubit miniaturization and quality,” said William Oliver, the director for the Center for Quantum Engineering at MIT. “Unlike conventional transistor scaling, where only the number really matters, for qubits, large numbers are not sufficient, they must also be high-performance. Sacrificing performance for qubit number is not a useful trade in quantum computing. They must go hand in hand.”

The key to this big increase in qubit density and reduction of interference comes down to the use of two-dimensional materials, in particular the 2D insulator hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). The MIT researchers demonstrated that a few atomic monolayers of hBN can be stacked to form the insulator in the capacitors of a superconducting qubit.

Just like other capacitors, the capacitors in these superconducting circuits take the form of a sandwich in which an insulator material is sandwiched between two metal plates. The big difference for these capacitors is that the superconducting circuits can operate only at extremely low temperatures—less than 0.02 degrees above absolute zero (-273.15 °C).

Golden dilution refrigerator hanging vertically Superconducting qubits are measured at temperatures as low as 20 millikelvin in a dilution refrigerator.Nathan Fiske/MIT

In that environment, insulating materials that are available for the job, such as PE-CVD silicon oxide or silicon nitride, have quite a few defects that are too lossy for quantum computing applications. To get around these material shortcomings, most superconducting circuits use what are called coplanar capacitors. In these capacitors, the plates are positioned laterally to one another, rather than on top of one another.

As a result, the intrinsic silicon substrate below the plates and to a smaller degree the vacuum above the plates serve as the capacitor dielectric. Intrinsic silicon is chemically pure and therefore has few defects, and the large size dilutes the electric field at the plate interfaces, all of which leads to a low-loss capacitor. The lateral size of each plate in this open-face design ends up being quite large (typically 100 by 100 micrometers) in order to achieve the required capacitance.

In an effort to move away from the large lateral configuration, the MIT researchers embarked on a search for an insulator that has very few defects and is compatible with superconducting capacitor plates.

“We chose to study hBN because it is the most widely used insulator in 2D material research due to its cleanliness and chemical inertness,” said colead author Joel Wang, a research scientist in the Engineering Quantum Systems group of the MIT Research Laboratory for Electronics.

On either side of the hBN, the MIT researchers used the 2D superconducting material, niobium diselenide. One of the trickiest aspects of fabricating the capacitors was working with the niobium diselenide, which oxidizes in seconds when exposed to air, according to Wang. This necessitates that the assembly of the capacitor occur in a glove box filled with argon gas.

While this would seemingly complicate the scaling up of the production of these capacitors, Wang doesn’t regard this as a limiting factor.

“What determines the quality factor of the capacitor are the two interfaces between the two materials,” said Wang. “Once the sandwich is made, the two interfaces are “sealed” and we don’t see any noticeable degradation over time when exposed to the atmosphere.”

This lack of degradation is because around 90 percent of the electric field is contained within the sandwich structure, so the oxidation of the outer surface of the niobium diselenide does not play a significant role anymore. This ultimately makes the capacitor footprint much smaller, and it accounts for the reduction in cross talk between the neighboring qubits.

“The main challenge for scaling up the fabrication will be the wafer-scale growth of hBN and 2D superconductors like [niobium diselenide], and how one can do wafer-scale stacking of these films,” added Wang.

Wang believes that this research has shown 2D hBN to be a good insulator candidate for superconducting qubits. He says that the groundwork the MIT team has done will serve as a road map for using other hybrid 2D materials to build superconducting circuits.


Match ID: 156 Score: 5.00 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 103 days
qualifiers: 3.57 trade, 1.43 development

10 Best Chrome Extensions That Are Perfect for Everyone
Mon, 31 Jan 2022 10:56:00 +0000

Are you a great Chrome user? That’s nice to hear. But first, consider whether or not there are any essential Chrome extensions you are currently missing from your browsing life, so here we're going to share with you10 Best Chrome Extensions That Are Perfect for Everyone

Are you a great Chrome user? That’s nice to hear. But first, consider whether or not there are any essential Chrome extensions you are currently missing from your browsing life, so here we're going to share with you 10 Best Chrome Extensions That Are Perfect for Everyone. So Let's Start.

1. LastPass

When you have too several passwords to remember, LastPass remembers them for you.

This chrome extension is an easy way to save you time and increase security. It’s a single password manager that will log you into all of your accounts. you simply ought to bear in mind one word: your LastPass password to log in to all or any your accounts.

Features

  • Save usernames and passwords and LastPasswill  log you  in  automatically.
  • Fill the forms quickly to save your addresses, credit card numbers and more.

2. MozBar

MozBar is an SEO toolbar extension that makes it easy for you to analyze your web pages' SEO while you surf. You can customize your search so that you see data for a particular region or for all regions. You get data such as website and domain authority and link profile. The status column tells you whether there are any no-followed links to the page.You can also compare link metrics. There is a pro version of MozBar, too.


3. Grammerly

Grammarly is a real-time grammar checking and spelling  tool for online writing. It checks spelling, grammar, and punctuation as you type, and has a dictionary feature that suggests related words. if you use mobile phones for writing than  Grammerly also have a mobile keyboard app.

4. VidlQ

VidIQ is a SaaS product and Chrome Extension that makes it easier to manage and optimize your YouTube channels. It keeps you informed about your channel's performance with real-time analytics and powerful insights.

Features

  • Learn more about insights and statistics beyond YouTube Analytics
  • Find great videos with the Trending tab.
  • You can check out any video’s YouTube rankings and see how your own video is doing on the charts.
  • Keep track  the  history of the keyword to determine when a keyword is rising or down  in popularity over time.
  • Quickly find out which videos are performing the best on YouTube right now.
  • Let this tool suggest keywords for you to use in your title, description and tags.

5. ColorZilla

ColorZilla is a browser extension that allows you to find out the exact color of any object in your web browser. This is especially useful when you want to match elements on your page to the color of an image.

Features 

  •  Advanced Color Picker (similar to Photoshop's)
  • Ultimate CSS Gradient Generator
  • The "Webpage Color Analyzer" site helps you determine the palette of colors used in a particular website.
  • Palette Viewer with 7 pre-installed palettes
  • Eyedropper - sample the color of any pixel on the page
  • Color History of recently picked colors
  • Displays some info about the element, including the tag name, class, id and size.
  • Auto copy picked colors to clipboard
  • Get colors of dynamic hover elements 
  • Pick colors from Flash objects
  • Pick colors at any zoom level



6. Honey

Honey is a chrome extension with which you  save each product from the website and notify it when it is available at  low price it's one among the highest extensions for Chrome that finds coupon codes whenever you look online.

Features

  • Best for finding exclusive prices on Amazon.
  • A free reward program called Honey Gold.
  • Searches and filters the simplest value fitting your demand.
  • Instant notifications.


7. GMass: Powerful Chrome Extension for Gmail Marketers

GMass (or Gmail Mass) permits users to compose and send mass emails using Gmail. it is a great tool as a result of you'll use it as a replacement for a third-party email sending platform. you will love GMass to spice up your emailing functionality on the platform.


8. Notion Web Clipper: Chrome Extension for Geeks

It's a Chrome extension for geeks that enables you to highlight and save what you see on the web.

It's been designed by Notion, that could be a Google space different that helps groups craft higher ideas and collaborate effectively.

Features

  • Save anything online with just one click  
  • Use it on any device
  • Organize your saved clips quickly
  • Tag, share and comment on the clips

If you are someone who works online, you need to surf the internet to get your business done. And often there is no time to read or analyze something. But it's important that you  do it. Notion Web Clipper will help you with that.

9. WhatFont: Chrome Extension for identifying Any Site Fonts

WhatFont is a Chrome extension that allows web designers to easily identify and compare different fonts on a page. The first time you use it on any page, WhatFont will copy the selected page.It  Uses this page to find out what fonts are present and generate an image that shows all those fonts in different sizes. Besides the apparent websites like Google or Amazon,  you'll conjointly use it on sites wherever embedded fonts ar used. 

10. SimilarWeb: Traffic Rank & Website Analysis Extension

Similar Web is an SEO add on for both Chrome and Firefox.It allows you  to check web site traffic and key metrics for any web site, as well as engagement rate, traffic ranking, keyword ranking, and traffic source. this is often a good tool if you are looking to seek out new and effective SEO ways similarly as analyze trends across the web.

Features

  • Discover keyword trends
  • Know fresh keywords
  • Get benefit from the real traffic insights
  • Analyze engagement metrics
  • Explore unique visitors data
  • Analyze your industry's category
  • Use month to date data


How to Install chrome Extension in Android

I know everyone knows how to install extension in pc but most of people don't know how to install it in android phone so i will show you how to install it in android

1. Download Kiwi browser from Play Store and then Open it.


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 2. Tap the three dots at the top right corner and select Extension. 




3. Click on (+From Store) to access chrome web store or simple search chrome web store and access it.


4. Once you found an extension click on add to chrome a message will pop-up  asking if you wish to confirm your choice. Hit OK to install the extension in the Kiwi browser.


5. To manage  extensions on the browser, tap the three dots in the upper right corner. Then select Extensions to access a catalog of installed extensions that you can disable, update or remove with just a few clicks.


Your Chrome extensions should install on Android, but there’s no guarantee all of them will work. Because Google Chrome Extensions are not optimized for Android devices.


Final Saying

We hope this list of 10 best chrome extensions that is perfect for everyone will help you in picking the right Chrome Extensions. We have selected the extensions after matching their features to the needs of different categories of people. Also which extension you like the most let me know in the comment section


Match ID: 157 Score: 5.00 source: www.crunchhype.com age: 110 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google, 1.43 amazon

Most Frequently Asked Questions About Email Marketing
Sat, 29 Jan 2022 12:45:00 +0000


1. Why is email marketing important?

Email is the marketing tool that helps you  create a seamless, connected, frictionless buyer journey. More importantly, email marketing allows you to build relationships with prospects, customers, and past customers. It's your chance to speak  to them right in their inbox, at a time that suits them. Along with the right message, email can become one of your most powerful marketing channels.

2. What is benefits of email marketing?

Email marketing is best way for creating long term relationship with your clients, and increasing sales in our company.

Benefits of email marketing for bussiness:
  • Better brand recognition
  • Statistics of what works best
  • More sales
  • Targeted audience
  • More traffic to your products/services/newsletter
  • Build credibility
Most  bussinesses are using email marketing and making tons of money with email marketing.

3. What is the simplest day and time to send my marketing emails?


Again, the answer to this question varies from company to company. And again, testing is the way to find out what works best. Typically, weekends and mornings seem to be  times when multiple emails are opened, but since your audience may have different habits, it's best to experiment and then use your  data to decide.

 4. Which metrics should I be looking at?


The two most important metrics for email marketing are  open rate and click-through rate. If your emails aren't opened, subscribers will never see your full marketing message, and if they open them but don't click through to your site, your emails won't convert.

5. How do I write a decent subject line?


The best subject lines are short and to the point, accurately describing  the content of the email, but also catchy and intriguing, so the reader wants to know more. Once Again, this is the perfect place for  A/B testing, to see what types of subject lines work best with your audience. Your call to action should be clear and  simple. It should be somewhere at the top of your email for those who haven't finished reading the entire email,  then repeated  at the end for those reading all the way through. It should state exactly what you want subscribers to do, for example "Click here to download the premium theme for free.




6. Is email marketing still effective?

Email marketing is one of the most effective ways for a business to reach its customers directly. Think about it. You don't post something on your site  hoping people will visit it. You don't even post something on a social media page and hope fans  see it. You're sending something straight to each person's inbox, where they'll definitely  see it! Even if they don't open it, they'll still see your subject line and business name every time you send an email, so you're still communicating directly with your audience.



7. However do I grow my email subscribers list? Should i buy an email list or build it myself?

Buying an email list is  waste of time & money. These email accounts are unverified and not interested in your brand. The mailing list is useless if your subscribers do not open your emails. There are different ways to grow your mailing list. 

Give them a free ebook and host it on a landing page where they have to enter the email to download the file and also create a forum page on your website, asks your visitors what questions they might have about your business, and collects email addresses to follow up with them.


8. How do I prevent audience from unsubscribing?


If the  subject line of the email is irrelevant to  customers, they will ignore it multiple times. But, if it keeps repeating, they are intercepted and unsubscribed from your emails. So, send relevant emails for the benefit of the customer. Don't send emails that often only focus  on sales, offers and discounts. 
Submit information about your business and offers so you can connect with customers. You can also update them on recent trends in your industry. The basic role of an email is first and foremost to  connect with customers, get the most out of this tool.

9. What is the difference between a cold email and a spam email?


Cold emails are mostly sales emails that are sent with content align to the needs of the recipient. It is usually personalized and includes a business perspective. However, it is still an unsolicited email. And all unsolicited emails are marked as SPAM. 
Regularly receiving this type of unsolicited email in your users' inboxes, chances are  your emails will soon be diverted to  spam or junk folders. The most important thing to prevent this from happening is to respect your recipients' choice to opt-out of receiving emails from you. You can add the links to easily unsubscribe. You must be familiar with the CAN-SPAM Act and its regulations.

10. Where can I find email template?

Almost all email campaign tools provide you with ready-made templates. Whether you use MailChimp or Pardot, you'll get several email templates ready to use.
 However, if you want to create a template from scratch, you can do so.Most of email campaign tools have option to paste the HTML code of your own design. 


11. What email marketing trend will help marketers succeed in 2022?

Is it a trend to listen to  and get to know your customers? I think people realize how bad it feels for a brand or a company to obsess over themselves without knowing their customers personal needs. People who listen empathetically and then provide value based on what they learn will win.


Final Saying


 You can approach email marketing in different ways. We have compiled a list of most frequently asked questions to help you understand how to get started, what constraints you need to keep in mind, and what future development you will need, we don’t have 100% answers to every situation and there’s always a chance you will have something new and different to deal with as you market your own business. 



Match ID: 158 Score: 5.00 source: www.crunchhype.com age: 112 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google, 1.43 development

NASA’s Space Launch System Will Lift Off
Sun, 26 Dec 2021 16:00:00 +0000


Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida—a cavernous structure built in the 1960s for constructing the Apollo program’s Saturn V rockets and, later, for preparing the space shuttle—the agency’s next big rocket is taking shape.

Tom Whitmeyer, NASA’s deputy associate administrator for exploration system development, recalled seeing the completed Space Launch System (SLS) vehicle there in October, after the last component, the Orion spacecraft, was installed on top. To fully view the 98-meter-tall vehicle, he had to back off to the opposite side of the building.

“It’s taller than the Statue of Liberty,” he said at an October 2021 briefing about the rocket’s impending launch. “And I like to think of it as the Statue of Liberty, because it’s [a] very engineering-complicated piece of equipment, and it’s very inclusive. It represents everybody.”

Perhaps so. But it’s also symbolic of NASA’s way of developing rockets, which is often characterized by cost overruns and delays. As this giant vehicle nears its first launch later this year, it runs the risk of being overtaken by commercial rockets that have benefited from new technologies and new approaches to development.

NASA’s newest rocket didn’t originate in the VAB, of course—it began life on Capitol Hill. In 2010, the Obama administration announced its intent to cancel NASA’s Constellation program for returning people to the moon, citing rising costs and delays. Some in Congress pushed back, worried about the effect on the space industry of canceling Constellation at the same time NASA was retiring its space shuttles.

The White House and Congress reached a compromise in a 2010 NASA authorization bill. It directed the agency to develop a new rocket, the Space Launch System, using technologies and contracts already in place for the shuttle program. The goal was to have a rocket capable of placing at least 70 tonnes into orbit by the end of 2016.

To achieve that, NASA extensively repurposed shuttle hardware. The core stage of SLS is a modified version of the external tank from the shuttle, with four RS-25 engines developed for the shuttle mounted on its base. Attached to the sides of the core stage are two solid-rocket boosters, similar to those used on the shuttle but with five segments of solid fuel instead of four.

Difficulties pushed back the first SLS launch by years, although not all the problems were within NASA’s control.

Mounted on top of the core stage is what’s called the Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage, which is based on the upper stage for the Delta IV rocket and is powered by one RL10 engine, a design that has been used for decades. This stage will propel the Orion capsule to the moon or beyond after it has attained orbit. As the name suggests, this stage is a temporary one: NASA is developing a more powerful Exploration Upper Stage, with four RL10 engines. But it won’t be ready until the mid-2020s.

Even though SLS uses many existing components and was not designed for reusability, combining those components to create a new rocket proved more difficult than expected. The core stage, in particular, turned out to be surprisingly complex, as NASA struggled with the challenge of incorporating four engines. Once the first core stage was complete, it spent more than a year on a test stand at NASA’s Stennis Space Center in Mississippi, including two static-fire tests of its engines, before going to the Kennedy Space Center for launch preparations.

Those difficulties pushed back the first SLS launch by years, although not all the problems were within NASA’s control. Hurricanes damaged the Stennis test stand as well as the New Orleans facility where the core stage is built. The pandemic also slowed the work, before and after all the components arrived at the VAB for assembly. “In Florida in August and September [2021], it hit our area very hard,” said Mike Bolger, manager of the exploration ground systems program at NASA, describing the most recent wave of the pandemic at the October briefing.

Now, after years of delays, the first launch of the SLS is finally getting close. “Completing stacking [of the SLS] is a really important milestone. It shows that we’re in the home stretch,” said Mike Sarafin, NASA’s manager for the first SLS mission, called Artemis 1, at the same briefing.

After a series of tests inside the VAB, the completed vehicle will roll out to Launch Complex 39B. NASA will then conduct a practice countdown called a wet dress rehearsal—“wet” because the core stage will be loaded with liquid-hydrogen and liquid-oxygen propellants.

Controllers will go through the same steps as in an actual countdown, stopping just before the point where the RS-25 engines would normally ignite. “For us, on the ground, it’s a great chance to get the team and the ground systems wrung out and ready for launch,” Bolger said of the wet dress rehearsal.

This photograph shows a giant spherical storage tank with an adjacent stairway to the top and pipes leading to it that are close to the ground. This giant tank will help increase the capacity for storing liquid hydrogen at the Kennedy Space Center. Glenn Benson/NASA

After that test, the SLS will roll back to the VAB for final checks before returning to the pad for the actual launch. The earliest possible launch for Artemis 1 is 12 February 2022, but at the time of this writing, NASA officials said it was too soon to commit to a specific launch date.

“We won’t really be in a position to set a specific launch date until we have a successful wet dress [rehearsal],” Whitmeyer said. “We really want to see the results of that test, see how we’re doing, see if there’s anything we need to do, before we get ready to launch.”

To send the uncrewed Orion spacecraft to the moon on its desired trajectory, SLS will have to launch in one of a series of two-week launch windows, dictated by a variety of constraints. The first launch window runs through 27 February. A second opens on 12 March and runs through 27 March, followed by a third from 8 to 23 April. Sarafin said there’s a “rolling analysis cycle” to calculate specific launch opportunities each day.

A complicating factor here is the supply of propellants available. The core stage’s tanks store 2 million liters of liquid hydrogen and almost three-quarters of a million liters of liquid oxygen, putting a strain on the liquid hydrogen available at the Kennedy Space Center.

“This rocket is so big, and we need so much liquid hydrogen, that our current infrastructure at the Kennedy Space Center just does not support an every-day launch attempt,” Sarafin said. If a launch attempt is postponed after the core stage is fueled, Bolger explained, NASA would have to wait days to try again. That’s because a significant fraction of liquid hydrogen is lost to boil-off during each launch attempt, requiring storage tanks to be refilled before the next attempt. “We are currently upgrading our infrastructure,” he said, but improvements like larger liquid hydrogen storage tanks won’t be ready until the second SLS mission in 2023. There’s no pressure to launch on a specific day, Sarafin said. “We’re going to fly when the hardware’s ready to fly.”

SLS is not the only game in town when it comes to large rockets. In a factory located just outside the gates of the Kennedy Space Center, Blue Origin, the spaceflight company founded by Amazon’s Jeff Bezos, is working on its New Glenn rocket. While not as powerful as SLS, its ability to place up to 45 tonnes into orbit outclasses most other rockets in service today. Moreover, unlike SLS, the rocket’s first stage is reusable, designed to land on a ship.

New Glenn and SLS do have something in common: development delays. Blue Origin once projected the first launch of the rocket to be in 2020. By early 2021, though, that launch date had slipped to no earlier than the fourth quarter of 2022.

A successful SpaceX Starship launch vehicle, fully reusable and able to place 100 tonnes into orbit, could also make the SLS obsolete.

A key factor in that schedule is the development of Blue Origin’s BE-4 engine, seven of which will power New Glenn’s first stage. Testing that engine has taken longer than expected, affecting not only New Glenn but also United Launch Alliance’s new Vulcan Centaur rocket, which uses two BE-4 engines in its first stage. Vulcan’s first flight has slipped to early 2022, and New Glenn could see more delays as well.

Meanwhile halfway across the country, at the southern tip of Texas, SpaceX is moving ahead at full speed with its next-generation launch system, Starship. For two years, the company has been busy building, testing, flying—and often crashing—prototypes of the vehicle, culminating in a successful flight in May 2021 when the vehicle lifted off, flew to an altitude of 10 kilometers, and landed.

SpaceX is now preparing for orbital test flights, installing the Starship vehicle on top of a giant booster called, aptly, Super Heavy. A first test flight will see Super Heavy lift off from the Boca Chica, Texas, test site and place Starship in orbit. Starship will make less than one lap around the planet, though, reentering the atmosphere and splashing down in the Pacific about 100 kilometers from the Hawaiian island of Kauai.

When that launch will take place remains uncertain—despite some optimistic announcements. “If all goes well, Starship will be ready for its first orbital launch attempt next month, pending regulatory approval,” SpaceX CEO Elon Musk tweeted on 22 October 2021. But Musk surely must have known at the time that regulatory approval would take much longer.

SpaceX needs a launch license from the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration to perform that orbital launch, and that license, in turn, depends on an ongoing environmental review of Starship launches from Boca Chica. The FAA hasn’t set a schedule for completing that review. But the draft version was open for public comments through the beginning of November, and it’s likely to take the FAA months to review those comments and incorporate them into the final version of the report. That suggests that the initial orbital flight of Starship atop Super Heavy will also take place sometime in early 2022.

Starship could put NASA in a bind. The agency is funding a version of Starship to serve as a lunar lander for the Artemis program, transporting astronauts to and from the surface of the moon as soon as 2025. So NASA clearly wants Starship development to proceed apace. But a successful Starship launch vehicle, fully reusable and able to place 100 tonnes into orbit, could also make the SLS obsolete.

Of course, on the eve of the first SLS launch, NASA isn’t going to give up on the vehicle it’s worked so long and hard to develop. “SLS and Orion were purpose-designed to do this mission,” says Pam Melroy, NASA deputy administrator. “It’s designed to take a huge amount of cargo and people to deep space. Therefore, it’s not something we’re going to walk away from.”


Match ID: 159 Score: 5.00 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 146 days
qualifiers: 2.14 musk, 1.43 development, 1.43 amazon

U.N. Kills Any Plans to Use Mercury as a Rocket Propellant
Tue, 19 Apr 2022 18:00:01 +0000


A recent United Nations provision has banned the use of mercury in spacecraft propellant. Although no private company has actually used mercury propellant in a launched spacecraft, the possibility was alarming enough—and the dangers extreme enough—that the ban was enacted just a few years after one U.S.-based startup began toying with the idea. Had the company gone through with its intention to sell mercury propellant thrusters to some of the companies building massive satellite constellations over the coming decade, it would have resulted in Earth’s upper atmosphere being laced with mercury.

Mercury is a neurotoxin. It’s also bio-accumulative, which means it’s absorbed by the body at a faster rate than the body can remove it. The most common way to get mercury poisoning is through eating contaminated seafood. “It’s pretty nasty,” says Michael Bender, the international coordinator of the Zero Mercury Working Group (ZMWG). “Which is why this is one of the very few instances where the governments of the world came together pretty much unanimously and ratified a treaty.”

Bender is referring to the 2013 Minamata Convention on Mercury, a U.N. treaty named for a city in Japan whose residents suffered from mercury poisoning from a nearby chemical factory for decades. Because mercury pollutants easily find their way into the oceans and the atmosphere, it’s virtually impossible for one country to prevent mercury poisoning within its borders. “Mercury—it’s an intercontinental pollutant,” Bender says. “So it required a global treaty.”

Today, the only remaining permitted uses for mercury are in fluorescent lighting and dental amalgams, and even those are being phased out. Mercury is otherwise found as a by-product of other processes, such as the burning of coal. But then a company hit on the idea to use it as a spacecraft propellant.

In 2018, an employee at Apollo Fusion approached the Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER), a nonprofit that investigates environmental misconduct in the United States. The employee—who has remained anonymous—alleged that the Mountain View, Calif.–based space startup was planning to build and sell thrusters that used mercury propellant to multiple companies building low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite constellations.

Four industry insiders ultimately confirmed that Apollo Fusion was building thrusters that utilized mercury propellant. Apollo Fusion, which was acquired by rocket manufacturing startup Astra in June 2021, insisted that the composition of its propellant mixture should be considered confidential information. The company withdrew its plans for a mercury propellant in April 2021. Astra declined to respond to a request for comment for this story.

Apollo Fusion wasn’t the first to consider using mercury as a propellant. NASA originally tested it in the 1960s and 1970s with two Space Electric Propulsion Tests (SERT), one of which was sent into orbit in 1970. Although the tests demonstrated mercury’s effectiveness as a propellant, the same concerns over the element’s toxicity that have seen it banned in many other industries halted its use by the space agency as well.

“I think it just sort of fell off a lot of folks’ radars,” says Kevin Bell, the staff counsel for PEER. “And then somebody just resurrected the research on it and said, ‘Hey, other than the environmental impact, this was a pretty good idea.’ It would give you a competitive advantage in what I imagine is a pretty tight, competitive market.”

That’s presumably why Apollo Fusion was keen on using it in their thrusters. Apollo Fusion as a startup emerged more or less simultaneously with the rise of massive LEO constellations that use hundreds or thousands of satellites in orbits below 2,000 kilometers to provide continual low-latency coverage. Finding a slightly cheaper, more efficient propellant for one large geostationary satellite doesn’t move the needle much. But doing the same for thousands of satellites that need to be replaced every several years? That’s a much more noticeable discount.

Were it not for mercury’s extreme toxicity, it would actually make an extremely attractive propellant. Apollo Fusion wanted to use a type of ion thruster called a Hall-effect thruster. Ion thrusters strip electrons from the atoms that make up a liquid or gaseous propellant, and then an electric field pushes the resultant ions away from the spacecraft, generating a modest thrust in the opposite direction. The physics of rocket engines means that the performance of these engines increases with the mass of the ion that you can accelerate.

Mercury is heavier than either xenon or krypton, the most commonly used propellants, meaning more thrust per expelled ion. It’s also liquid at room temperature, making it efficient to store and use. And it’s cheap—there’s not a lot of competition with anyone looking to buy mercury.

Bender says that ZMWG, alongside PEER, caught wind of Apollo Fusion marketing its mercury-based thrusters to at least three companies deploying LEO constellations—One Web, Planet Labs, and SpaceX. Planet Labs, an Earth-imaging company, has at least 200 CubeSats in low Earth orbit. One Web and SpaceX, both wireless-communication providers, have many more. One Web plans to have nearly 650 satellites in orbit by the end of 2022. SpaceX already has nearly 1,500 active satellites aloft in its Starlink constellation, with an eye toward deploying as many as 30,000 satellites before its constellation is complete. Other constellations, like Amazon’s Kuiper constellation, are also planning to deploy thousands of satellites.

In 2019, a group of researchers in Italy and the United States estimated how much of the mercury used in spacecraft propellant might find its way back into Earth’s atmosphere. They figured that a hypothetical LEO constellation of 2,000 satellites, each carrying 100 kilograms of propellant, would emit 20 tonnes of mercury every year over the course of a 10-year life span. Three quarters of that mercury, the researchers suggested, would eventually wind up in the oceans.

That amounts to 1 percent of global mercury emissions from a constellation only a fraction of the size of the one planned by SpaceX alone. And if multiple constellations adopted the technology, they would represent a significant percentage of global mercury emissions—especially, the researchers warned, as other uses of mercury are phased out as planned in the years ahead.

Fortunately, it’s unlikely that any mercury propellant thrusters will even get off the ground. Prior to the fourth meeting of the Minamata Convention, Canada, the European Union, and Norway highlighted the dangers of mercury propellant, alongside ZMWG. The provision to ban mercury usage in satellites was passed on 26 March 2022.

The question now is enforcement. “Obviously, there aren’t any U.N. peacekeepers going into space to shoot down” mercury-based satellites, says Bell. But the 137 countries, including the United States, who are party to the convention have pledged to adhere to its provisions—including the propellant ban.

The United States is notable in that list because as Bender explains, it did not ratify the Minamata Convention via the U.S. Senate but instead deposited with the U.N. an instrument of acceptance. In a 7 November 2013 statement (about one month after the original Minamata Convention was adopted), the U.S. State Department said the country would be able to fulfill its obligations “under existing legislative and regulatory authority.”

Bender says the difference is “weedy” but that this appears to mean that the U.S. government has agreed to adhere to the Minamata Convention’s provisions because it already has similar laws on the books. Except there is still no existing U.S. law or regulation banning mercury propellant. For Bender, that creates some uncertainty around compliance when the provision goes into force in 2025.

Still, with a U.S. company being the first startup to toy with mercury propellant, it might be ideal to have a stronger U.S. ratification of the Minamata Convention before another company hits on the same idea. “There will always be market incentives to cut corners and do something more dangerously,” Bell says.

Update 19 April 2022: In an email, a spokesperson for Astra stated that the company's propulsion system, the Astra Spacecraft Engine, does not use mercury. The spokesperson also stated that Astra has no plans to use mercury propellant and that the company does not have anything in orbit that uses mercury.

Updated 20 April 2022 to clarify that Apollo Fusion was building thrusters that used mercury, not that they had actually used them.


Match ID: 160 Score: 4.29 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 32 days
qualifiers: 2.14 musk, 1.43 amazon, 0.71 startup

Following the Money in the Air-Taxi Craze
Tue, 08 Feb 2022 15:04:00 +0000


When entrepreneur JoeBen Bevirt launched Joby Aviation 12 years ago, it was just one of a slew of offbeat tech projects at his Sproutwerx ranch in the Santa Cruz mountains. Today, Joby has more than 1,000 employees and it’s backed by close to US $2 billion in investments, including $400 million from Toyota Motor Corporation along with big infusions from Uber and JetBlue.

Having raked in perhaps 30 percent of all the money invested in electrically-powered vertical takeoff and landing (eVTOL) aircraft so far, Joby is the colossus in an emerging class of startups working on these radical, battery-powered commercial flyers. All told, at least 250 companies worldwide are angling to revolutionize transportation in and around cities with a new category of aviation, called urban air mobility or advanced air mobility. With Joby at the apex, the category’s top seven companies together have hauled in more than $5 billion in funding—a figure that doesn’t include private firms, whose finances haven’t been disclosed.

But with some of these companies pledging to start commercial operations in 2024, there is no clear answer to a fundamental question: Are we on the verge of a stunning revolution in urban transportation, or are we witnessing, as aviation analyst Richard Aboulafia puts it, the “mother of all aerospace bubbles”?

Even by the standards of big-money tech investment, the vision is giddily audacious. During rush hour, the skies over a large city, such as Dubai or Madrid or Los Angeles, would swarm with hundreds, and eventually thousands, of eVTOL “air taxis.” Each would seat between one and perhaps half a dozen passengers, and would, eventually, be autonomous. Hailing a ride would be no more complicated than scheduling a trip on a ride-sharing app.

“We’re going to have to get the consumer used to thinking about flying in a small aircraft without a pilot on board. I have reservations about the general public’s willingness to accept that vision.”
—Laurie Garrow, Georgia Tech

And somehow, the cost would be no greater, either. In a discussion hosted by the Washington Post last July, Bevirt declared, “Our initial price point would be comparable to the cost of a taxi or an Uber, but our target is to move quickly down to the cost of what it costs you to drive your own car. And we believe that's the critical unlock to making this transformative to the world and for people’s daily lives.” Asked to put some dollar figures on his projection, Bevirt said, “Our goal is to launch this service [in 2024] at an average price of around $3 a mile and to move that down below $1 a mile over time.” The cost of an Uber varies by city and time of day, but it’s usually between $1 and $2 per mile, not including fees.

Industry analysts tend to have more restrained expectations. With the notable exception of China, they suggest, limited commercial flights will begin with eVTOL aircraft flown by human pilots, a phase that is expected to last six to eight years at least. Costs will be similar to those of helicopter trips, which tend to be in the range of $6 to $10 per mile or more. Of the 250+ startups in the field, only three—Kittyhawk, Wisk Aero (a joint venture of Kittyhawk and Boeing), and Ehang—plan to go straight to full autonomy without a preliminary phase involving pilots, says Chris Anderson, Chief Operating Officer at Kittyhawk.

To some, the autonomy issue is the heart of whether this entire enterprise can succeed economically. “When you figure in autonomy, you go from $3 a mile to 50 cents a mile,” says Anderson, citing studies done by his company. “You can’t do that with a pilot in the seat.”

Laurie A. Garrow, a professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology, agrees. “For the large-scale vision, autonomy will be critical,” she says. “In order to get to the vision that people have, where this is a ubiquitous mode of transportation with a high market share, the only way to get that is by… eliminating the pilot.” Garrow, a civil engineer who co-directs the university’s Center for Urban and Regional Air Mobility, adds that autonomy presents challenges beyond technology: “We’re going to have to get the consumer used to thinking about flying in a small aircraft without a pilot on board. I have reservations about the general public’s willingness to accept that vision, especially early on.”

“The technical problems are, if not solved, then solvable. The main limiters are laws and regulations.”
—Chris Anderson, COO, Kittyhawk

Some analysts have much more fundamental doubts. Aboulafia, managing director at the consultancy AeroDynamic Advisory, says the figures simply don’t add up. eVTOL startups are counting on mass-manufacturing techniques to reduce the costs of these exotic aircraft, but such techniques have never been applied to producing aircraft on the scale specified in the projections. Even the anticipated lower operating costs, Aboulafia adds, won’t compensate. “If I started a car service here in Washington, D.C., using Rolls Royces, you’d think I was out of my mind, right?,” he asks. “But if I put batteries in those Rolls Royces, would you think I was any less crazy?”

What everyone agrees on is that achieving even a modest amount of success for eVTOLs will require surmounting entire categories of challenges, including regulations and certification, technology development, and the operational considerations of safely flying large numbers of aircraft in a small airspace.

To some, certification will be the highest hurdle. “The technical problems are, if not solved, then solvable,” says Anderson. “The main limiters are laws and regulations.”

There are dozens of aviation certification agencies in the world. But the three most important ones for these new aircraft are the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in the U.S., the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), and the Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC). Of the three, the FAA is considered the most challenging, for several reasons. One is that, to deal with eVTOLs, the agency has chosen to adapt its existing certification rules. That gives some observers pause, because the FAA does not have a body of knowledge and experience for certifying aircraft that fly by means of battery systems and electric motors. The EASA, on the other hand, has created an entirely new set of regulations tailored for eVTOL aircraft and related technology, according to Erin Rivera, senior associate for regulatory affairs at Lilium.

To clear an aircraft for commercial flight, the FAA actually requires three certifications: one for the aircraft itself, one for its operations, and one for its manufacturing. For the aircraft, the agency designates different categories, or “parts,” for different kinds of fliers. For eVTOLs (other than multicopters), the applicable category seems to be Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 23, which covers “normal, utility, acrobatic, and commuter category airplanes.” The certification process itself is performance based, meaning that the FAA establishes performance criteria that an aircraft must meet, but does not specify how it must meet them.

Because eVTOLs are so novel, the FAA is expected to lean on industry-developed standards referred to as Means of Compliance (MOC). The proposed MOCs must be acceptable to the FAA. Through a certification scheme known as the “issue paper process,” the applicant begins by submitting what’s known as a G1 proposal, which specifies the applicable certification standards and special conditions that must be met to achieve certification. The FAA reviews and then either approves or rejects the proposal. If it’s rejected, the applicant revises the proposal to address the FAA’s concerns and tries again.

“If very high levels of automation are critical to scaling, that will be very difficult to certify. How do you certify all the algorithms?”
—Matt Metcalfe, Deloitte Consulting

Some participants are wary. When he was the chief executive of drone maker 3D Robotics, Anderson participated in an analogous experiment in which the FAA had pledged to work more closely with industry to expedite certification of drone aircraft such as multicopters. “That was five years ago, and none of the drones have been certified,” Anderson points out. “It was supposed to be agile and streamlined, and it has been anything but.”

Nobody knows how many eVTOL startups have started the certification process with the FAA, although a good guess seems to be one or two dozen. Joby is furthest along in the process, according to Mark Moore, CEO of Whisper Aero, a maker of advanced electric propulsor systems in Crossville, Tenn. The G1 certification proposals are not public, but when the FAA accepts one (presumably Joby’s), it will become available through the U.S. Federal Register for public comment. Observers expect that to happen any day now.

This certification phase of piloted aircraft is fraught with unknowns because of the novelty of the eVTOL craft themselves. But experts say a greater challenge lies ahead, when manufacturers seek to certify the vehicles for autonomous flight. “If very high levels of automation are critical to scaling, that will be very difficult to certify,” says Matt Metcalfe, a managing director in Deloitte Consulting's Future of Mobility and Aviation practice. “That’s a real challenge, because it’s so complicated. How do you certify all the algorithms?”

“It’s a matter of, how do you ensure that autonomous technology is going to be as safe as a pilot?,” says an executive at one of the startups. “How do you certify that it’s always going to be able to do what it says? With true autonomous technology, the system itself can make an undetermined number of decisions, within its programming. And the way the current certification regulations work, is that they want to be able to know the inputs and outcome of every decision that the aircraft system makes. With a fully autonomous system, you can’t do that.”

Perhaps surprisingly, most experts contacted for this story agreed with Kittyhawk's Anderson that the technical challenges of building the aircraft themselves are solvable. Even autonomy—certification challenges aside—is within reach, most say. The Chinese company EHang has already offered fully autonomous, trial flights of its EH216 multicopter to tourists in the northeastern port city of Yantai and is now building a flight hub in its home city of Guangzhou. Wisk, Kittyhawk, Joby, and other companies have collectively conducted thousands of flights that were at least partially autonomous, without a pilot on board.

Experts foresee eVTOLs largely replacing helicopters for niche applications. There’s less agreement on whether middle-class people will ever be routinely whisked around cities for pennies a mile.

A more imposing challenge, and one likely to determine whether the grand vision of urban air mobility comes to pass, is whether municipal and aviation authorities can solve the challenges of integrating large numbers of eVTOLs into the airspace over major cities. Some of these challenges are, like the aircraft themselves, totally new. For example, most viable scenarios require the construction of “vertiports” in and around cities. These would be like mini airports where the eVTOLs would take off and land, be recharged, and take on and discharge passengers. Right now, it’s not clear who would pay for these. “Manufacturers probably won’t have the money to do it,” says Metcalfe at Deloitte.

As Georgia Tech's Garrow sees it, “vertiports may be one of the greatest constraints on scalability of UAM.” Vertiports, she explains, will be the “pinch points,” because at urban facilities, space will likely be limited to accommodating several aircraft at most. And yet at such a facility, room will be needed during rush hours to accommodate dozens of aircraft needing to land, be charged, take on passengers, and take off. “So the scalability of operations at the vertiports, and the amount of land space required to do that, are going to be two major challenges.”

Despite all the challenges, Garrow, Metcalfe, and others are cautiously optimistic that air mobility will eventually become part of the urban fabric in many cities. They foresee an initial period in which the eVTOLs largely replace helicopters in a few niche applications, such as linking downtown transportation depots to airports for those who can afford it, taking tourists on sightseeing tours, and transporting organs and high-risk patients among hospitals. There’s less agreement on whether middle-class people will ever be routinely whisked around cities for pennies a mile. Even some advocates think that’s more than 10 years away, if it happens at all.

If it does happen, a few studies have predicted that travel times and greenhouse-gas and pollutant emissions could all be reduced. A 2020 study published by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences found a substantial reduction in overall energy use for transportation under “optimistic” scenarios for urban air mobility. And a 2021 study at the University of California, Berkeley, found that in the San Francisco Bay area, overall travel times could be reduced with as few as 10 vertiports. The benefits went up as the number of vertiports increased and as the transfer times at the vertiports went down. But the study also warned that “vertiport scheduling and capacity may become bottlenecks that limit the value of UAM.”

Metacalfe notes that ubiquitous modern conveniences like online shopping have already unleashed tech-based revolutions on a par with the grand vision for UAM. “We tend to look at this through the lens of today,” he says. “And that may be the wrong way to look at it. Ten years ago we never would have thought we’d be getting two or three packages a day. Similarly, the way we move people and goods in the future could be very, very different from the way we do it today.”

This article appears in the March 2022 print issue as “What’s Behind the Air-Taxi Craze.”


Match ID: 161 Score: 4.29 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 102 days
qualifiers: 1.43 development, 1.43 california, 0.71 uber, 0.71 startup

Top 9 Free AI Tools That Make Your Life Easier
Mon, 24 Jan 2022 12:07:00 +0000


Photo:- Copy.ai


First one on the list is copy.ai. It is an AI based copy writer tool. Basically  what a copywriter tool does is, it gives you content that you can post on your blog or video  when you give it a few descriptions about the topic you want content on.So copy ai can help you write instagram captions gives you blog idea, product descriptions,  facebook content, startup ideas, viral ideas, a lot of things it can do, you just make an account  in this website, then select a tool and fill in the necessary description and the AI will generate  content on what you ask for.

For tutorials go to their official Youtube  channel .An awesome tool that is going to be really handy in the future.


Hotpot.ai offers a collection of  AI tools for designers, as well as for anyone, it has an “AI picture restorer” which removes  scratches ,and basically restores your old photo into amazing pictures and makes it look brand new. 

 Ai picture colorizer , turns your black and white photo into color. And there is a background  remover tool, picture enlarger and a lot more for designers, check it out,and explore all the tools.



Deep-nostalgia became  very popular on the internet when people started 

making reaction videos of their parents reacting  to animated pictures of their grandparents. So deep - nostalgia is a very cool app, that will  animate any photo of a person.

 So what makes it really cool is that fact that you can upload an  old photo of your family and see them animate and living. Which is pretty cool and creepy at  the same time if they are dead already.. Really amazing service from myheritage, I created a  lot of cool animations with my old photos as well as with the photos of my grandparents.

Having a nice  looking profile picture is really important if you want that professional feel in your socials.  Whether in linkedin or twitter having a 

distinct and catchy profile picture can make  all the difference. So that's where pfpmaker comes in. it a free online tool to create amazing professional profile pictures that fits you. It generates a lot of profile pictures  and you can also make small changes to already created profile pictures if you want to,as well.



Speaking of brands, getting a  good logo for your brand is the most frustrating 

thing ever, so brandmark.io makes it super easy.  It will create a logo for your brand within 2 clicks. So you goto this website. Type in your brand name and slogan if you have any, and give BRAND KEYWORDS that relate to your brand,  then pick a color style and done, the ai will 

generate amazing logos for you. 

You can also make  minor edits to the suggested logos to better fit your needs as well. But to get that png you need  to pay a hefty price, but if you are looking for some logo ideas, this is a great place to start.



Even in the previous websites, some  had picture enlarger tools. This deep-image.ai is a dedicated image enlarger, which supports upto 4x  enlargement for free. The UI is pretty good and the tool is pretty fast with amazing results.



Bigjpg does the same as  deep-image.ai , but this service offers a little bit more options like if your photo is an artwork  it scales image differently than normal photos and it supports upto 4x enlargement for free  and you can also set noise reduction options. Very good tool,


Lumen5 is an  online marketing video maker that makes it really easy to create branding or informational videos  within a couple of clicks. They have really great templates and various aspect ratios for various  social media platforms. 
You can also edit each element of the video if you don't like the preset,  and the best part is, they have a ton of , I mean a ton of free stock photos and videos.You can also  upload your own videos or any type of media. Definitely a good tool if you don't know how  to work with complex tools like after effects, but want to create a sick video for your brand.




If you are struggling to find  good names for your brand or youtube channel, give 

namelix a try. It's an ai based name generator  that will suggest good names for your brand depending on the keyword that you give..  Also logo for your brand. Pretty cool and an amazing piece of tool. So that's been it , those are my favourite free AI based tools that you can use right now,

Which one You like the most Let me know in the Comments below.  



Match ID: 162 Score: 4.29 source: www.crunchhype.com age: 117 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google, 0.71 startup

Maple Seeds Inspire Efficient Spinning Microdrone
Fri, 13 May 2022 13:00:01 +0000


The relatively simple and now quite pervasive quadrotor design for drones emphasizes performance and manufacturability, which is fine, but there are some trade-offs—namely, endurance. Four motors with rapidly spinning tiny blades suck up battery power, and while consumer drones have mitigated this somewhat by hauling around ever-larger batteries, the fundamental problem is one of efficiency in flight.

In a paper published this week in Science Robotics, researchers from the City University of Hong Kong have come up with a drone inspired by maple seeds that weighs less than 50 grams but can hold a stable hover for over 24 minutes.


Maple seed pods, also called samaras, are those things you see whirling down from maple trees in the fall, helicopter style. The seed pods are optimized for maximum air time through efficient rotating flight, thanks to an evolutionary design process that rewards the distance traveled from the parent tree, resulting in a relatively large wing with a high ratio of wing to payload.

Samara drones (or monocopters, more generally) have been around for quite a while. They make excellent passive spinny gliders when dropped in midair, and they can also achieve powered flight with the addition of a propulsion system on the tip of the wing. This particular design is symmetrical, using two sizable wings, each with a tip propeller. The electronics, battery, and payload are in the center, and flight consists of the entire vehicle spinning at about 200 rpm:

The bicopter is inherently stable, with the wings acting as aerodynamic dampers that result in passive-attitude stabilization, something that even humans tend to struggle with. With a small battery, the drone weighs just 35 grams with a wingspan of about 60 centimeters. The key to the efficiency is that unlike most propellerized drones, the propellers aren’t being used for lift—they’re being used to spin the wings, and that’s where the lift comes from. Full 3D control is achieved by carefully pulsing the propellers at specific points in the rotation of the vehicle to translate in any direction. With a 650-milliampere-hour battery (contributing to a total vehicle mass of 42.5 g), the drone is able to hover in place for 24.5 minutes. The ratio of mass to power consumption that this represents is about twice as good as other small multirotor drones.

You may be wondering just how fundamentally useful a platform like this is if it’s constantly spinning. Some sensors simply don’t care about spinning, while other sensors have to spin themselves if they’re not already spinning, so it’s easy to see how this spinning effect could actually be a benefit for, say, lidar. Cameras are a bit more complicated, but by syncing the camera frame rate to the spin rate of the drone, the researchers were able to use a 22-g camera payload to capture four 3.5 fps videos simultaneously, recording video of every direction at once.

Despite the advantages of these samara-inspired designs, we haven’t seen them make much progress out of research contexts, which is a real shame. The added complication seems to be enough that at least for most consumer and research applications, it’s just easier to build traditional quadrotors. Near-term applications might be situations in which you need lightweight, relatively long-duration, functional-aerial-mapping, or surveillance systems.

A bioinspired revolving-wing drone with passive attitude stability and efficient hovering flight,” by Songnan Bai, Qingning He, and Pakpong Chirarattananon from the City University of Hong Kong, is published in Science Robotics.


Match ID: 163 Score: 3.57 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 8 days
qualifiers: 3.57 trade

Android 13 Tries to Make Privacy and Security a No-Brainer
Wed, 11 May 2022 19:33:40 +0000
With its latest mobile OS update, Google aims to simplify the adoption of Android’s protective features for users and developers alike.
Match ID: 164 Score: 3.57 source: www.wired.com age: 10 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google

AMD Gave Google Cloud Rare Access to Its Tech to Hunt Chip Flaws
Tue, 10 May 2022 19:00:00 +0000
By working together, the companies say they’re better able to find security flaws in Google Cloud’s Confidential Computing infrastructure.
Match ID: 165 Score: 3.57 source: www.wired.com age: 11 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google

What to Do If You Can’t Log In to Your Google Account
Mon, 09 May 2022 11:00:00 +0000
Locked out of your calendar or Gmail? Here’s how to get unstuck—and prevent it from happening in the first place.
Match ID: 166 Score: 3.57 source: www.wired.com age: 12 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google

What is Blockchain: Everything You Need to Know (2022)
Mon, 18 Apr 2022 05:49:00 +0000
What is Blockchain

If you want to pay online, you need to register an account and provide credit card information. If you don't have a credit card, you can pay with bank transfer. With the rise of cryptocurrencies, these methods may become old.

Imagine a world in which you can do transactions and many other things without having to give your personal information. A world in which you don’t need to rely on banks or governments anymore. Sounds amazing, right? That’s exactly what blockchain technology allows us to do.

It’s like your computer’s hard drive. blockchain is a technology that lets you store data in digital blocks, which are connected together like links in a chain. 

Blockchain technology was originally invented in 1991 by two mathematicians, Stuart Haber and W. Scot Stornetta. They first proposed the system to ensure that timestamps could not be tampered with.

A few years later, in 1998, software developer Nick Szabo proposed using a similar kind of technology to secure a digital payments system he called “Bit Gold.” However, this innovation was not adopted until Satoshi Nakamoto claimed to have invented the first Blockchain and Bitcoin.

So, What is Blockchain?

A blockchain is a distributed database shared between the nodes of a computer network. It saves information in digital format. Many people first heard of blockchain technology when they started to look up information about bitcoin.

Blockchain is used in cryptocurrency systems to ensure secure, decentralized records of transactions.

Blockchain allowed people to guarantee the fidelity and security of a record of data without the need for a third party to ensure accuracy.

To understand how a blockchain works, Consider these basic steps:

  • Blockchain collects information in “blocks”.
  • A block has a storage capacity, and once it's used up, it can be closed and linked to a previously served block.
  • Blocks form chains, which are called “Blockchains.”
  • More information will be added to the block with the most content until its capacity is full. The process repeats itself.
  • Each block in the chain has an exact timestamp and can't be changed.

Let’s get to know more about the blockchain.

How does blockchain work?

Blockchain records digital information and distributes it across the network without changing it. The information is distributed among many users and stored in an immutable, permanent ledger that can't be changed or destroyed. That's why blockchain is also called "Distributed Ledger Technology" or DLT.

Here’s how it works:

  • Someone or a computer will transacts
  • The transaction is transmitted throughout the network.
  • A network of computers can confirm the transaction.
  • When it is confirmed a transaction is added to a block
  • The blocks are linked together to create a history.

And that’s the beauty of it! The process may seem complicated, but it’s done in minutes with modern technology. And because technology is advancing rapidly, I expect things to move even more quickly than ever.

  • A new transaction is added to the system. It is then relayed to a network of computers located around the world. The computers then solve equations to ensure the authenticity of the transaction.
  • Once a transaction is confirmed, it is placed in a block after the confirmation. All of the blocks are chained together to create a permanent history of every transaction.

How are Blockchains used?

Even though blockchain is integral to cryptocurrency, it has other applications. For example, blockchain can be used for storing reliable data about transactions. Many people confuse blockchain with cryptocurrencies like bitcoin and ethereum.

Blockchain already being adopted by some big-name companies, such as Walmart, AIG, Siemens, Pfizer, and Unilever. For example, IBM's Food Trust uses blockchain to track food's journey before reaching its final destination.

Although some of you may consider this practice excessive, food suppliers and manufacturers adhere to the policy of tracing their products because bacteria such as E. coli and Salmonella have been found in packaged foods. In addition, there have been isolated cases where dangerous allergens such as peanuts have accidentally been introduced into certain products.

Tracing and identifying the sources of an outbreak is a challenging task that can take months or years. Thanks to the Blockchain, however, companies now know exactly where their food has been—so they can trace its location and prevent future outbreaks.

Blockchain technology allows systems to react much faster in the event of a hazard. It also has many other uses in the modern world.

What is Blockchain Decentralization?

Blockchain technology is safe, even if it’s public. People can access the technology using an internet connection.

Have you ever been in a situation where you had all your data stored at one place and that one secure place got compromised? Wouldn't it be great if there was a way to prevent your data from leaking out even when the security of your storage systems is compromised?

Blockchain technology provides a way of avoiding this situation by using multiple computers at different locations to store information about transactions. If one computer experiences problems with a transaction, it will not affect the other nodes.

Instead, other nodes will use the correct information to cross-reference your incorrect node. This is called “Decentralization,” meaning all the information is stored in multiple places.

Blockchain guarantees your data's authenticity—not just its accuracy, but also its irreversibility. It can also be used to store data that are difficult to register, like legal contracts, state identifications, or a company's product inventory.

Pros and Cons of Blockchain

Blockchain has many advantages and disadvantages. 

Pros

  • Accuracy is increased because there is no human involvement in the verification process.
  • One of the great things about decentralization is that it makes information harder to tamper with.
  • Safe, private, and easy transactions
  • Provides a banking alternative and safe storage of personal information

Cons

  • Data storage has limits.
  • The regulations are always changing, as they differ from place to place.
  • It has a risk of being used for illicit activities 

Frequently Asked Questions About Blockchain

I’ll answer the most frequently asked questions about blockchain in this section.

Is Blockchain a cryptocurrency?

Blockchain is not a cryptocurrency but a technology that makes cryptocurrencies possible. It's a digital ledger that records every transaction seamlessly.

Is it possible for Blockchain to be hacked?

Yes, blockchain can be theoretically hacked, but it is a complicated task to be achieved. A network of users constantly reviews it, which makes hacking the blockchain difficult.

What is the most prominent blockchain company?

Coinbase Global is currently the biggest blockchain company in the world. The company runs a commendable infrastructure, services, and technology for the digital currency economy.

Who owns Blockchain?

Blockchain is a decentralized technology. It’s a chain of distributed ledgers connected with nodes. Each node can be any electronic device. Thus, one owns blockhain.

What is the difference between Bitcoin and Blockchain technology?

Bitcoin is a cryptocurrency, which is powered by Blockchain technology while Blockchain is a distributed ledger of cryptocurrency 

What is the difference between Blockchain and a Database?

Generally a database is a collection of data which can be stored and organized using a database management system. The people who have access to the database can view or edit the information stored there. The client-server network architecture is used to implement databases. whereas a blockchain is a growing list of records, called blocks, stored in a distributed system. Each block contains a cryptographic hash of the previous block, timestamp and transaction information. Modification of data is not allowed due to the design of the blockchain. The technology allows decentralized control and eliminates risks of data modification by other parties.

Final Saying

Blockchain has a wide spectrum of applications and, over the next 5-10 years, we will likely see it being integrated into all sorts of industries. From finance to healthcare, blockchain could revolutionize the way we store and share data. Although there is some hesitation to adopt blockchain systems right now, that won't be the case in 2022-2023 (and even less so in 2026). Once people become more comfortable with the technology and understand how it can work for them, owners, CEOs and entrepreneurs alike will be quick to leverage blockchain technology for their own gain. Hope you like this article if you have any question let me know in the comments section

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Match ID: 167 Score: 3.57 source: www.crunchhype.com age: 34 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google

Starfall: Finding a Meteorite with Drones and AI
Thu, 24 Mar 2022 21:41:38 +0000


Go outside on a clear night, and if you’re very lucky you will see the sky falling. NASA estimates that 50,000 meteorites from space have been found on Earth.

The shooting stars or fireballs they form as they enter the atmosphere can be beautiful, but they’re hard to track. Of those 50,000, astronomers have been able to plot the past orbits of only about 40.

Which is why Seamus Anderson and his colleagues at Curtin University in Australia may have made an important first. They report they’ve recovered a meteorite in the remote Australian outback—one that once followed an ellipse between the orbits of Venus and Jupiter—and they picked it out of nowhere with two drones and machine learning.

“It was a semi-surprise,” says Anderson, an American who came to Curtin in 2018 to do his Ph.D. work on technology for meteorite searches. “We weren’t expecting to have that much success the first time.”

Curtin’s Space Science and Technology Center, in the city of Perth, runs the Desert Fireball Network, a system of 50 automated cameras that monitor Australia’s night skies for incoming meteors. One night last year, two of the cameras tracked a streak in the sky, and the system calculated that a small rock had probably crashed in the desert scrub of Western Australia, in a region known as the Nullarbor. The observations weren’t ideal—they estimated that the meteorite weighed between 150 and 700 grams and had come down in an area of 5 square kilometers—but Anderson and two colleagues decided to make a field trip. In December, they set out from Perth on a drive of more than 1,000 km looking for a needle in a haystack: one blackened piece of rock on the desert floor, 50 km from the nearest paved road.

In the past, the trip would have been all but pointless. Meteorite hunters usually search the ground on foot, walking back and forth in a grid pattern and hoping they hit pay dirt. Eighty percent of the time, they fail.

“It’s been shown that people are just terrible at these kinds of repetitive tasks,” says Anderson. “A major problem is humans just not paying attention.”

Through repetition, the machine and the researchers learned to deal with false positives: bottles, cans, desert plant roots, and occasional kangaroo bones.

That’s where technology came in. They used off-the-shelf hardware—a quadcopter drone with a 44-megapixel camera and a desktop computer with a good video card. The unusual part was the convolutional neural network they ran on it—machine-learning software not often carried by campers in the outback.

“The holy grail of meteorite hunting right now is a drone that can grid a geographic area, look at the ground, and find meteorites with AI,” says Mike Hankey of the American Meteor Society.

Overhead shot shows 3 people in the desert pointing at the ground. Seamus Anderson [right] poses with his two colleagues, both pointing at the meteorite they just found. The photo was taken with the drone they had used to locate the specimen.Seamus Anderson/Curtin University

A machine-learning system needs training—data about the world from which it can extrapolate—so the researchers fed it drone images of the Nullarbor terrain. Some of them included meteorite samples borrowed from a local museum and planted on the ground. Those images were given a score of 1—a definite meteorite, even if each appeared only as a black dot. Other images showing random terrain nearby were scored as 0—no meteorite here. Through repetition, the machine and the researchers learned to deal with false positives: bottles, cans, desert plant roots, and occasional kangaroo bones.

“It’s like training your kid to figure out what a dog looks like,” says Anderson now. “You could show lots of images of nothing but black Labs—and then, when it sees a picture of a German Shepard, it’s maybe going to freak out and not know exactly what it’s supposed to do. So you have to give it many opportunities to know what a meteorite can look like in that background.”

Top satellite image  has insets of a meteor falling and blue lines indicating search zones. Bottom shows an orbital map and a closer satellite of the desert with dots showing searched areas. Top: The incoming meteor and where it landed in Western Australia. Bottom left: The likely orbit of the meteoroid before it hit the Earth. Bottom: The section of desert scientists searched. Seamus Anderson/Curtin University

They began surveying: 43 drone flights over three days, going back and forth at an altitude of about 20 meters, recording 57,255 images. Back at camp, they began to process their images. From the first four flights alone, the algorithm gave 59,384 objects a score of at least 0.7 on that scale of 0 to 1—a lot of possible specimens. The researchers were quickly able to narrow them down to 259 and then 38, which they reinspected with a second, smaller drone. Soon they were down to four, and set out on foot, guided by GPS, to find them.

Before we reach the conclusion, it’s worth pausing to ask why meteorites are worth chasing. Space scientists will say that some date from the beginnings of the solar system. Some contain amino acids, those most basic building blocks of life. A few are large enough to do harm. Others, Anderson points out, contain rare elements, perhaps valuable for future technologies but hard to mine on Earth.

So there was a lot to think about in the desert heat—life, the universe, the reliability of their algorithm—as Anderson and his two comrades paced the ground looking for a blackened rock.

“Then one of my friends on the trip, John Fairweather, said one of the most annoying things you can hear at that moment—like, ‘Hey, is this the meteorite?’” Anderson says. He thought it was a joke. “And I thought, ‘That’s not funny right now, John.’ And I looked over and, literally, he’s got the rock.”

Closeup of the meteorite on the desert floor in Australia, with a pen to show its size. The meteorite, named DFN 09, is shown here with a pen for scale.Seamus Anderson/Curtin University

Anderson looked around to be sure the surroundings matched what the overhead drone image had shown. They did. The rock was a chondrite, a common type of iron-rich meteorite. It was 5 centimeters long, about the size of an egg, and weighed 70 grams. Most important to Anderson, the algorithm had given this particular patch of ground a score of 1.0—a perfect match.

“And I stood there, and I basically just screamed for a minute or two. Yes, it was awesome.”


Match ID: 168 Score: 3.57 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 58 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google

Sellfy Review 2022: How Good Is This Ecommerce Platform?
Sat, 12 Mar 2022 11:54:00 +0000

 

Sellfy

Are you searching for an ecomerce platform to help you build an online store and sell products?

In this Sellfy review, we'll talk about how this eCommerce platform can let you sell digital products while keeping full control of your marketing.

And the best part? Starting your business can be done in just five minutes.

Let us then talk about the Sellfy platform and all the benefits it can bring to your business.

What is Sellfy?

Sellfy is an eCommerce solution that allows digital content creators, including writers, illustrators, designers, musicians, and filmmakers, to sell their products online. Sellfy provides a customizable storefront where users can display their digital products and embed "Buy Now" buttons on their website or blog. Sellfy product pages enable users to showcase their products from different angles with multiple images and previews from Soundcloud, Vimeo, and YouTube. Files of up to 2GB can be uploaded to Sellfy, and the company offers unlimited bandwidth and secure file storage. Users can also embed their entire store or individual project widgets in their site, with the ability to preview how widgets will appear before they are displayed.

Features

Sellfy includes:

Online Store

Sellfy is a powerful e-commerce platform that helps you personalize your online storefront. You can add your logo, change colors, revise navigation, and edit the layout of your store. Sellfy also allows you to create a full shopping cart so customers can purchase multiple items. And Sellfy gives you the ability to set your language or let customers see a translated version of your store based on their location.

Sellfy gives you the option to host your store directly on its platform, add a custom domain to your store, and use it as an embedded storefront on your website. Sellfy also optimizes its store offerings for mobile devices, allowing for a seamless checkout experience.

Product hosting

Sellfy allows creators to host all their products and sell all of their digital products on one platform. Sellfy also does not place storage limits on your store but recommends that files be no larger than 5GB. Creators can sell both standard and subscription-based products in any file format that is supported by the online marketplace. Customers can purchase products instantly after making a purchase – there is no waiting period.

You can organize your store by creating your product categories, sorting by any characteristic you choose. Your title, description, and the image will be included on each product page. In this way, customers can immediately evaluate all of your products. You can offer different pricing options for all of your products, including "pay what you want," in which the price is entirely up to the customer. This option allows you to give customers control over the cost of individual items (without a minimum price) or to set pricing minimums—a good option if you're in a competitive market or when you have higher-end products. You can also offer set prices per product as well as free products to help build your store's popularity.

Sellfy is ideal for selling digital content, such as ebooks. But it does not allow you to copyrighted material (that you don't have rights to distribute).

Embed options

Sellfy offers several ways to share your store, enabling you to promote your business on different platforms. Sellfy lets you integrate it with your existing website using "buy now" buttons, embed your entire storefront, or embed certain products so you can reach more people. Sellfy also enables you to connect with your Facebook page and YouTube channel, maximizing your visibility.

Payments and security

Sellfy is a simple online platform that allows customers to buy your products directly through your store. Sellfy has two payment processing options: PayPal and Stripe. You will receive instant payments with both of these processors, and your customer data is protected by Sellfy's secure (PCI-compliant) payment security measures. In addition to payment security, Sellfy provides anti-fraud tools to help protect your products including PDF stamping, unique download links, and limited download attempts.


Marketing and analytics tools

The Sellfy platform includes marketing and analytics tools to help you manage your online store. You can send email product updates and collect newsletter subscribers through the platform. With Sellfy, you can also offer discount codes and product upsells, as well as create and track Facebook and Twitter ads for your store. The software's analytics dashboard will help you track your best-performing products, generated revenue, traffic channels, top locations, and overall store performance.

Integrations

To expand functionality and make your e-commerce store run more efficiently, Sellfy offers several integrations. Google Analytics and Webhooks, as well as integrations with Patreon and Facebook Live Chat, are just a few of the options available. Sellfy allows you to connect to Zapier, which gives you access to hundreds of third-party apps, including tools like Mailchimp, Trello, Salesforce, and more.

Pricing and Premium Plan Features

Get Sellfy 14 day free trail from here

Free Plan

  • Price: $0

The free plan comes with:

  • Up to 10 products
  • Print-on-demand products
  • Physical products

Starter Plan

  • Price: $19/month

Starter plan comes with:

  • Everything is Free, plus:
  • Unlimited products
  • Digital products
  • Subscription products
  • Connect your domain
  • 2,000 email credits

Business Plan

  • Price: $49/month

The business plan comes with:

  • Everything in Starter, plus:
  • Remove "Sellfy" branding
  • Store design migration
  • Cart abandonment
  • Product upselling
  • 10,000 email credits

Premium Plan

  • Price: $99/month

The premium plan comes with:

  • Everything in Business, plus:
  • Product migration
  • Priority support
  • 50,000 email credits

Sellfy Review: Pros and Cons

Sellfy has its benefits and downsides, but fortunately, the pros outweigh the cons.

Pros

  • It takes only a few minutes to set up an online store and begin selling products.
  • You can sell your products on a single storefront, even if you are selling multiple product types.
  • Sellfy supports selling a variety of product types, including physical items, digital goods, subscriptions, and print-on-demand products.

  • Sellfy offers a free plan for those who want to test out the features before committing to a paid plan.
  • You get paid the same day you make a sale. Sellfy doesn't delay your funds as some other payment processors do. 
  • Print-on-demand services are available directly from your store, so you can sell merchandise to fans without setting up an integration. 
  • You can conduct all store-related activities via the mobile app and all online stores have mobile responsive designs.
  • Everything you need to make your website is included, including a custom domain name hosting, security for your files, and the ability to customize your store
  • The file security features can help you protect your digital property by allowing you to put PDF stamps, set download limits, and SSL encryption.
  • Sellfy provides unlimited support.
  • Sellfy provides simple and intuitive tax and VAT configuration settings.
  • Marketing strategies include coupons, email marketing, upselling, tracking pixels, and cart abandonment.

Cons

  • Although the free plan is helpful, but it limits you to only 10 products.
  • Payment plans often require an upgrade if you exceed a certain sales amount per year.
  • The storefront designs are clean, but they're not unique templates for creating a completely different brand image.
  • Sellfy's branding is removed from your hosted product when you upgrade to the $49 per month Business plan.
  • The free plan does not allow for selling digital or subscription products.

Conclusion

In this article, we have taken a look at some of the biggest benefits associated with using sellfy for eCommerce. Once you compare these benefits to what you get with other platforms such as Shopify, you should find that it is worth your time to consider sellfy for your business. After reading this article all of your questions will be solved but if you have still some questions let me know in the comment section below, I will be happy to answer your questions.

Note: This article contains affiliate links which means we make a small commission if you buy sellfy premium plan from our link.



Match ID: 169 Score: 3.57 source: www.crunchhype.com age: 70 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google

Top 10 Best PLR(Private Label Rights) Websites | Which One You Should Join in 2022?
Sat, 26 Feb 2022 13:36:00 +0000
PLR


Content creation is one of the biggest struggles for many marketers and business owners. It often requires both time and financial resources, especially if you plan to hire a writer.
Today, we have a fantastic opportunity to use other people's products by purchasing Private Label Rights.

To find a good PLR website, first, determine the type of products you want to acquire. One way to do this is to choose among membership sites or PLR product stores. Following are 10 great sites that offer products in both categories.

What are PLR websites?

Private Label Rights (PLR) products are digital products that can be in the form of an ebook, software, online course videos, value-packed articles, etc. You can use these products with some adjustments to sell as your own under your own brand and keep all the money and profit yourself without wasting your time on product creation.
The truth is that locating the best website for PLR materials can be a time-consuming and expensive exercise. That’s why we have researched, analyzed, and ranked the best 10 websites:

1. PLR.me

 PLR.me is of the best places to get PLR content in 2021-2022. It offers a content marketing system that comes with courses, brandable tools, and more. It is the most trusted PLR website, among other PLR sites. The PLR.me platform features smart digital caching PLR tools for health and wellness professionals. The PLR.me platform, which was built on advanced caching technology, has been well-received by big brands such as Toronto Sun and Entrepreneur. The best thing about this website is its content marketing automation tools.

Pricing

  • Pay-as-you-go Plan – $22
  • 100 Monthly Plan – $99/month
  • 400 Annual Plan – $379/year
  • 800 Annual Plan – $579/year
  • 2500 Annual Plan – $990/year

Pros

  • Access over 15,940+ ready-to-use PLR coaching resources.
  • Content marketing and sliding tools are provided by the site.
  • You can create courses, products, webinars, emails, and nearly anything else you can dream of.
  • You can cancel your subscription anytime.

Cons

  • Compared to other top PLR sites, this one is a bit more expensive.

2. InDigitalWorks

InDigitalWorks is a leading private label rights membership website established in 2008. As of now, it has more than 100,000 members from around the globe have joined the platform. The site offers thousands of ready-to-be-sold digital products for online businesses in every single niche possible. InDigitalWorks features hundreds of electronic books, software applications, templates, graphics, videos that you can sell right away.

Pricing:

  • 3 Months Plan – $39
  • 1 Year Plan – $69
  • Lifetime Plan – $79

Pros

  • IndigitalWorks promotes new authors by providing them with 200 free products for download.
  • Largest and most reputable private label rights membership site.
  •  20000+ digital products
  • 137 training videos provided by experts to help beginners set up and grow their online presence for free.
  • 10 GB of web hosting will be available on a reliable server.

Cons

  • Fewer people are experiencing the frustration of not getting the help they need.

3. BuyQualityPLR

BuyQualityPLR’s website is a Top PLR of 2021-2022! It's a source for major Internet Marketing Products and Resources. Whether you’re an Affiliate Marketer, Product Creator, Course Seller,  BuyQualityPLR can assist you in the right direction. You will find several eBooks and digital products related to the Health and Fitness niche, along with a series of Security-based products. If you search for digital products, Resell Rights Products, Private Label Rights Products, or Internet Marketing Products, BuyQualityPLR is among the best websites for your needs.

Pricing

  • Free PLR articles packs, ebooks, and other digital products are available
  • Price ranges from 3.99$ to 99.9$

Pros

  • Everything on this site is written by professionals
  • The quick download features available
  • Doesn't provide membership.
  • Offers thousand of PLR content in many niches
  • Valuable courses available

Cons

  • You can't buy all content because it doesn't provide membership

4. IDPLR

The IDPLR website has helped thousands of internet marketers since 2008. This website follows a membership approach and allows you to gain access to thousands of PLR products in different niches. The best thing about this site is the quality of the products, which is extremely impressive.
This is the best PLR website of 2021-2022, offering over 200k+ high-quality articles. It also gives you graphics, templates, ebooks, and audio.

Pricing

  • 3 Months ACCESS: $39
  • 1 YEAR ACCESS: $69
  • LIFETIME ACCESS: $79

Pros

  • You will have access to over 12,590 PLR products.
  • You will get access to training tutorials and Courses in a Gold membership.
  • 10 GB of web hosting will be available on a reliable server.
  • You will receive 3D eCover Software
  • It offers an unlimited download limit
  • Most important, you will get a 30 day money-back guarantee

Cons:

  • A few products are available for free membership.

5. PLRMines

PLRmines is a leading digital product library for private label rights products. The site provides useful information on products that you can use to grow your business, as well as licenses for reselling the content. You can either purchase a membership or get access through a free trial, and you can find unlimited high-quality resources via the site's paid or free membership. Overall, the site is an excellent resource for finding outstanding private label rights content.

Pricing

  • Lifetime membership:  $97

Pros

  • 4000+ ebooks from top categories
  • Members have access to more than 660 instructional videos covering all kinds of topics in a membership area.
  • You will receive outstanding graphics that are ready to use.
  • They also offer a variety of helpful resources and tools, such as PLR blogs, WordPress themes, and plugins

Cons

  • The free membership won't give you much value.

6. Super-Resell

Super-Resell is another remarkable provider of PLR material. The platform was established in 2009 and offers valuable PLR content to users. Currently, the platform offers standard lifetime memberships and monthly plans at an affordable price. Interested users can purchase up to 10,000 products with digital rights or rights of re-sale. Super-Resell offers a wide range of products such as readymade websites, article packs, videos, ebooks, software, templates, and graphics, etc.

Pricing

  • 6 Months Membership: $49.90
  • Lifetime membership: $129

Pros

  • It offers you products that come with sales pages and those without sales pages.
  •  You'll find thousands of digital products that will help your business grow.
  • Daily News update

Cons

  • The company has set up an automatic renewal system. This can result in costs for you even though you are not using the service.

7. Unstoppable PLR

UnStoppablePLR was launched in 2006 by Aurelius Tjin, an internet marketer. Over the last 15 years, UnStoppablePLR has provided massive value to users by offering high-quality PLR content. The site is one of the best PLR sites because of its affordability and flexibility.

Pricing

  • Regular Price: $29/Month

Pros

  • You’ll get 30 PLR articles in various niches for free.
  • 100% money-back guarantee.
  • Members get access to community
  • It gives you access to professionally designed graphics and much more.

Cons

  • People often complain that not enough PLR products are released each month. 

8. Resell Rights Weekly

Resell Rights Weekly, a private label rights (PLR) website, provides exceptional PLR content. It is among the top free PLR websites that provide free membership. You will get 728+ PLR products completely free and new products every single week. The Resell Rights Weekly gives you free instant access to all products and downloads the ones you require.

Pricing

  • Gold Membership: $19.95/Month

Pros

  • Lots of products available free of cost
  • Free access to the  members forum

Cons

  • The prices for the products at this PLR site are very low quality compared to other websites that sell the same items.

9. MasterResellRights

MasterResellRights was established in 2006, and it has helped many successful entrepreneurs. Once you join MasterResellRights, you will get access to more than 10,000 products and services from other members. It is one of the top PLR sites that provide high-quality PLR products to members across the globe. You will be able to access a lot of other membership privileges at no extra price. The website also provides PLR, MRR, and RR license products.

Pricing

One Month Membership: $19.97
Three Month Membership: $47.00

Pros

Access more than 10,000 high-quality,  PLR articles in different niches.
Get daily fresh new updates
Users get 8 GB of hosting space
You can pay using PayPal

Cons

Only members have access to the features of this site.

10. BigProductStore 

BigProductStore is a popular private label rights website that offers tens of thousands of digital products. These include software, videos, video courses, eBooks, and many others that you can resell, use as you want, or sell and keep 100% of the profit.
The PLR website updates its product list daily. It currently offers over 10,000 products.
The site offers original content for almost every niche and when you register as a member, you can access the exclusive products section where you can download a variety of high-quality, unique, and exclusive products.

Pricing

  • Monthly Plan: $19.90/Month 27% off
  • One-Time-Payment: $98.50  50% off
  • Monthly Ultimate: $29.90/Month 36% off
  • One-Time-Payment Ultimate: $198.50 50% off

Pros

  • You can use PLR products to generate profits, give them as bonuses for your affiliate promotion campaign, or rebrand them and create new unique products.
  • Lifetime memberships for PLR products can save you money if you’re looking for a long-term solution to bulk goods.
  • The website is updated regularly with fresh, quality content.

Cons

  • Product descriptions may not provide much detail, so it can be difficult to know just what you’re downloading.
  • Some product categories such as WP Themes and articles are outdated. 

Match ID: 170 Score: 3.57 source: www.crunchhype.com age: 84 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google

Top 7 Best Wordpress Plugin Of All Time
Fri, 11 Feb 2022 09:00:00 +0000

 

If you are looking for the best wordpress plugins, then you are at the right place. Here is the list of best wordpress plugins that you should use in your blog to boost SEO, strong your security and know every aspects of your blog . Although creating a good content is one factor but there are many wordpress plugins that perform different actions and add on to your success. So let's  start

1.Yoast SEO

Those users who are serious about SEO, Yoast SEO will do the work for them to reach their goals. All they need to do is select a keyword, and the plugin will then optimize your page according to the specified keyword

Yoast offers many popular SEO WordPress plugin functions. It gives you real-time page analysis to optimize your content, images, meta descriptions, titles, and kewords. Yoast also checks the length of your sentences and paragraphs, whether you’re using enough transition words or subheadings, how often you use passive voice, and so on. Yoast tells Google whether or not to index a page or a set of pages too.

Let me summarize these points in bullets:

  • Enhance the readability of your article to reduce bounce rate
  • Optimize your articles with targetted keywords
  • Let Google know who you are and what your site is about
  • Improve your on-page SEO with advanced, real-time guidance and advice on keyword usage, linking, and external linking.
  • Keep your focus keywords consistent to help rank better on  Google.
  • Preview how your page would appear in the search engine results page (SERP)
  • Crawl your site daily to ensure Google indexes it as quickly as possible.
  • Rate your article informing you of any mistakes you might have made so that you can fix them before publishing.
  • Stay up-to-date with Google’s latest algorithm changes and adapt your on-page SEO as needed with smartsuggestionss from the Yoast SEO plugin. This plugin is always up-to-date.
  • Free Version is available 

Pricing

  • Premium version=$89/year that comes with extra functions, allowing you to optimize your content up to five keywords, among other benefits.


2. WP Rocket

A website running WordPress can put a lot of strain on a server, which increases the chances that the website will crash and harm your business. To avoid such an unfortunate situation and ensure that all your pages load quickly, you need a caching plugin like WP Rocket.

WP Rocket plugin designed to increases your website speed. Instead of waiting for pages to be saved to cache, WP Rocket turns on desired caching settings, like page cache and gzip compression. The plugin also activates other features, such as CDN support and llazy image loadding, to enhance your site speed.

Features in bullets:

  • Browser Catching
  • Preloading the cache of pages
  • Reducing the number of HTTP requests allows websites to load more quickly.
  • Decreasing bandwidth usage with GZIP compression
  • Apply optimal browser caching headers (expires)
  • Minifying and combining JavaScript and CSS files
  • Remove Unused CSS
  • Deferred loading of images (LazyLoad)
  • WebP compatibility
  • Deferred loading of JavaScript files
  • Delay JavaScript Execution
  • Critical Path CSS generation and deferred loading of CSS files
  • Database optimization
  • WordPress Heartbeat API control
  • DNS prefetch
  • CDN integration
  • Cloudflare integration
  • Sucuri integration
  • Easy import/export of settings
  • Easy roll back to a previous version


Pricing

  • Single License =$49/year for one website
  • Plus License =$99/year for 3 websites
  • Infinite License =$249/year for unlimited websites


3.Wordfence Security

Wordfence Security is a WordPress firewall and security scanner that keeps your site safe from malicious hackers, spam, and other online threats. This Plugin comes with a web application firewall (WAF) called tthread Defence  Feed  that helps to prevents brute force attacks by ensuring you set stronger passwords and limiting login attempts. It searches for malware and compares code, theme, and plugin files with the records in the WordPress.org repository to verify their integrity and reports changes to you.

Wordfence security scanner provides you with actionable insights into your website's security status and will alert you to any potential threats, keeping it safe and secure. It also includes login security features that let you activate reCAPTCHA and two-factor authentication for your website.

Features in Bullets.

  • Scans your site for vulnerabilities.
  • Alerts you by email when new threats are detected.
  • Supports advanced login security measures.
  • IP addresses may be blocked automatically if suspicious activity is detected.

Pricing

  • Premium Plan= $99/Year that comes with extra security features like the real time IP backlist and country blocking option and also support from highly qualified experts.

4. Akismet

Akismet can help prevent spam from appearing on your site. Every day, it automatically checks every comment against a global database of spam to block malicious content. With Akismet, you also won’t have to worry about innocent comments being caught by the filter or false positives. You can simply tell Akismet about those and it will get better over time. It also checks your contact form submissions against its global spam database and weed out unnecessary fake information.

Features in Bullets:

  • The program automatically checks comments and filters out spam.
  • Hidden or misleading links are often revealed in the comment body. 
  • Akismet tracks the status of each comment, allowing you to see which ones were caught by Akismet and which ones were cleared by a moderator.
  • A spam-blocking feature that saves disk space and makes your site run faster.
  • Moderators can view a list of comments approved by each user.

Pricing

  • Free to use for personal blog 

5. Contact Form 7

Contact Form 7 is a plug-in that allows you to create contact forms that make it easy for your users to send messages to your site. The plug-in was developed by Takayuki Miyoshi and lets you create multiple contact forms on the same site; it also integrates Akismet spam filtering and lets you customize the styling and fields that you want to use in the form. The plug-in provides CAPTCHA and Ajax submitting.

Features in bullets:

  • Create and manage multiple contact forms
  • Easily customize form fields
  • Use simple markup to alter mail content
  • Add Lots of third-party extensions for additional functionality
  • Shortcode offers a way to insert content into pages or posts.
  • Akismet spam filtering, Ajax-powered submitting, and CAPTCHA are all features of this plugin.

Pricing

  • Free to use

6. Monster Insights

When you’re looking for an easy way to manage your Google Analytics-related web tracking services, Monster Insights can help. You can add, customize, and integrate Google Analytics data with ease so you’ll be able to see how every webpage performs, which online campaigns bring in the most traffic, and which content readers engage with the most. It’s same as Google Analytics

It is a powerful tool to keep track of your traffic stats. With it, you can view stats for your active sessions, conversions, and bounce rates. You’ll also be able to see your total revenue, the products you sell, and how your site is performing when it comes to referrals.

MonsterInsights offers a free plan that includes basic Google Analytics integration, data insights, and user activity metrics.

Features in bullets:

  • Demographics and interest reports:
  • Anonymize the  IPs of visitor
  • See the results of how far visitors Scroll down
  • Show the insights of multiple links to the same page and show you which links get more clicks
  • See sessions of two related sites as a single session
  • Google AdSense tracking
  • Send you weekly analytics report of your blog you can download it as pdf

Pricing

  • Premium plan= $99.50/year that comes with extra features like page and post tracking, Adsense tracking,  custom tracking and reports.

7. Pretty Links

Pretty Links is a powerful WordPress plugin that enables you to easily cloak affiliate links on your websiteIt even allows you to easily redirect visitors based on a specific request, including permanent 301 and temporary 302/307 redirects.

Pretty links also helps you to automatically shorten your url for your post and pages.

You can also enable auto-linking feature to automatically add affiliate links for certain keywords

Features

  •  Create clean, easy-to-remember URLs on your website (301, 302, and 307 redirects only)
  • Random-generator or custom URL slugs
  • Track the number of clicks
  • Easy to understand reports
  • View click details including ip address, remote host, browser, operating system, and referring site
  • You can pass custom parameters to your scripts when using pretty permalinks, and still have full tracking capability.
  • Exclude IP Addresses from Stats
  • Cookie-based system to track your activity across clicks
  • Create nofollow/noindex links
  • Toggle tracking on / off on each link.
  • Pretty Link Bookmarklet
  •  Update redirected links easily to new URLs!

Pricing

  • Beginner Plan=$79/year that can be used on 1 site
  • Marketer Plan: $99/year – that can be used on upto 2 sites
  • Super Affiliate Plan: $149/year – that can be use on upto 5 sites


We hope you’ve found this article useful. We appreciate you reading and welcome your feedback if you have it.



Match ID: 171 Score: 3.57 source: www.crunchhype.com age: 99 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google

Ginger VS Grammarly: Which Grammar Checker is Better in (2022) ?
Thu, 10 Feb 2022 10:28:00 +0000
Grammarly vs Ginger


Ginger VS Grammarly: When it comes to grammar checkers, Ginger and Grammarly are two of the most popular choices on the market. This article aims to highlight the specifics of each one so that you can make a more informed decision about the one you'll use.

What is Grammarly?

If you are a writer, you must have heard of  Grammarly before. Grammarly has over 10M users across the globe, it's probably the most popular AI writing enhancement tool, without a doubt. That's why there's a high chance that you already know about Grammarly.

But today we are going to do a comparison between Ginger and Grammarly, So let's define Grammarly here. Like Ginger, Grammarly is an AI writing assistant that checks for grammatical errors, spellings, and punctuation. The free version covers the basics like identifying grammar and spelling mistakes

While the Premium version offers a lot more functionality, it detects plagiarism in your content, suggests word choice, or adds fluency to it.

Features of Grammarly

  • Grammarly detects basic to advance grammatical errors and also help you why this is an error and suggest to you how you can improve it
  • Create a personal dictionary 
  • Check to spell for American, British, Canadian, and Australian English.
  • Understand inconsistencies. 
  • Detect unclear structure. 
  • Detect Plagiarism.
  • Explore overuse of words and wordiness. 
  • Get to know about the improper tones. 
  • Discover the insensitive language aligns with your intent, audience, style, emotion, and more.


What is Ginger

 Ginger is a writing enhancement tool that not only catches typos and grammatical mistakes but also suggests content improvements. As you type, it picks up on errors then shows you what’s wrong, and suggests a fix. It also provides you with synonyms and definitions of words and allows you to translate your text into dozens of languages.


Ginger Software: Features & Benefits

  • Ginger's software helps you identify and correct common grammatical mistakes, such as consecutive nouns, or contextual spelling correction.
  • The sentence rephrasing feature can help you convey your meaning perfectly.
  • Ginger acts like a personal coach that helps you practice certain exercises based on your mistakes.
  • The dictionary feature helps users understand the meanings of words.

In addition, the program provides a text reader, so you can gauge your writing’s conversational tone.


Ginger vs Grammarly

Grammarly and Ginger are two popular grammar checker software brands that help you to become a better writer. But if you’re undecided about which software to use, consider these differences:

  • Grammarly only supports the English language while Ginger supports 40+ languages.
  • Grammarly offers a wordiness feature while Ginger lacks a Wordiness feature.
  • Grammarly shows an accuracy score while Ginger lacks an accuracy score feature.
  • Grammarly has a plagiarism checker while ginger doesn't have such a feature.
  • Grammarly can recognize an incorrect use of numbers while Ginger can’t recognize an incorrect use of numbers.
  • Grammarly and Ginger both have mobile apps.
  • Ginger and Grammarly offer monthly, quarterly, and annual plans.
  • Grammarly allows you to check uploaded documents. while Ginger doesn't check uploaded documents.
  • Grammarly Offers a tone suggestion feature while Ginger doesn't offer a tone suggestion feature.
  • Ginger helps to translate documents into 40+ languages while Grammarly doesn't have a translation feature.
  • Ginger Offers text to speech features while Grammarly doesn't have such features.


Grammarly Score: 7/10

Ginger:4/10

So Grammarly  wins here.

Ginger VS Grammarly: Pricing Difference

  • Ginger offers a Premium subscription for 13.99$/month. it comes at $11.19/month for quarterly and $7.49/month for an annual subscription with 40$ off.
  • On the other hand,  Grammarly offers a Premium subscription for $30/month for a monthly plan  $20/month for quarterly, and $12/month for an annual subscription.

For companies with three or more employees, the Business plan costs $12.50/month for each member of your team. 

Ginger Wins Here

Ginger vs Grammarly – Pros and Cons


Grammarly Pros

  • Offers  free version
  • All-in-one tool (grammar checker + spell checker + punctuation checker)
  • Allows you to edit a document without affecting the formatting.
  • Style checker (paid version)

  • Active and passive voice checker
  • Personal dictionary 
  • Plagiarism checker (paid version)
  • Available on all major devices and platforms
  • Free mobile apps 
  • User-friendly interface
  • Browser extensions and MS word add-ons
  • Can upload and download documents


Grammarly Cons

  • Supports only English 
  • Customer support only via email
  • Limits to 150,000 words
  • Subscription plans can be a bit pricey 
  • Doesn’t offer a free trial
  • No refund policy

Ginger Pros

  • Offers free version
  • All-in-one tool (grammar checker + spell checker + punctuation checker)
  • Affordable Subscription plans (Additionals discounts are available)
  • Active and passive voice changer
  • Translates documents in 40+ languages 
  • Personal dictionary
  • Browser extension available 
  •  Personal trainers help clients develop their knowledge of grammar.
  • Text-to-speech feature reads work out loud
  • Get a full refund within 7 days


Ginger Cons

  • Mobile apps aren't free
  • Limited monthly corrections for free users
  • No style checker
  • No plagiarism checker
  • Not as user-friendly as Grammarly
  • You are unable to upload or download documents; however, you may copy and paste files as needed.
  • Doesn't offer a free trial


Summarizing the Ginger VS Grammarly: My Recommendation

While both writing assistants are fantastic in their ways, you need to choose the one you want. 

For example, go for Grammarly if you want a plagiarism tool included. 

Choose Ginger if you want to write in languages other than English. I will to the differences for you in order to make the distinctions clearer.

  • Grammarly offers a plagiarism checking tool
  • Ginger provides text to speech tool
  • Grammarly helps you check uploaded documents
  • Ginger supports over 40 languages
  • Grammarly has a more friendly UI/UX
Both Ginger and Grammarly are awesome writing tools, without a doubt. Depending on your needs, you might want to use Ginger over Grammarly. As per my experience, I found Grammarly easier to use than Ginger.

Which one you like let me know in the comments section also give your opinions in the comments section below.


Match ID: 172 Score: 3.57 source: www.crunchhype.com age: 100 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google

How AI Will Change Chip Design
Tue, 08 Feb 2022 14:00:01 +0000


The end of Moore’s Law is looming. Engineers and designers can do only so much to miniaturize transistors and pack as many of them as possible into chips. So they’re turning to other approaches to chip design, incorporating technologies like AI into the process.

Samsung, for instance, is adding AI to its memory chips to enable processing in memory, thereby saving energy and speeding up machine learning. Speaking of speed, Google’s TPU V4 AI chip has doubled its processing power compared with that of its previous version.

But AI holds still more promise and potential for the semiconductor industry. To better understand how AI is set to revolutionize chip design, we spoke with Heather Gorr, senior product manager for MathWorks’ MATLAB platform.

How is AI currently being used to design the next generation of chips?

Heather Gorr: AI is such an important technology because it’s involved in most parts of the cycle, including the design and manufacturing process. There’s a lot of important applications here, even in the general process engineering where we want to optimize things. I think defect detection is a big one at all phases of the process, especially in manufacturing. But even thinking ahead in the design process, [AI now plays a significant role] when you’re designing the light and the sensors and all the different components. There’s a lot of anomaly detection and fault mitigation that you really want to consider.

Portrait of a woman with blonde-red hair smiling at the camera Heather GorrMathWorks

Then, thinking about the logistical modeling that you see in any industry, there is always planned downtime that you want to mitigate; but you also end up having unplanned downtime. So, looking back at that historical data of when you’ve had those moments where maybe it took a bit longer than expected to manufacture something, you can take a look at all of that data and use AI to try to identify the proximate cause or to see something that might jump out even in the processing and design phases. We think of AI oftentimes as a predictive tool, or as a robot doing something, but a lot of times you get a lot of insight from the data through AI.

What are the benefits of using AI for chip design?

Gorr: Historically, we’ve seen a lot of physics-based modeling, which is a very intensive process. We want to do a reduced order model, where instead of solving such a computationally expensive and extensive model, we can do something a little cheaper. You could create a surrogate model, so to speak, of that physics-based model, use the data, and then do your parameter sweeps, your optimizations, your Monte Carlo simulations using the surrogate model. That takes a lot less time computationally than solving the physics-based equations directly. So, we’re seeing that benefit in many ways, including the efficiency and economy that are the results of iterating quickly on the experiments and the simulations that will really help in the design.

So it’s like having a digital twin in a sense?

Gorr: Exactly. That’s pretty much what people are doing, where you have the physical system model and the experimental data. Then, in conjunction, you have this other model that you could tweak and tune and try different parameters and experiments that let sweep through all of those different situations and come up with a better design in the end.

So, it’s going to be more efficient and, as you said, cheaper?

Gorr: Yeah, definitely. Especially in the experimentation and design phases, where you’re trying different things. That’s obviously going to yield dramatic cost savings if you’re actually manufacturing and producing [the chips]. You want to simulate, test, experiment as much as possible without making something using the actual process engineering.

We’ve talked about the benefits. How about the drawbacks?

Gorr: The [AI-based experimental models] tend to not be as accurate as physics-based models. Of course, that’s why you do many simulations and parameter sweeps. But that’s also the benefit of having that digital twin, where you can keep that in mind—it's not going to be as accurate as that precise model that we’ve developed over the years.

Both chip design and manufacturing are system intensive; you have to consider every little part. And that can be really challenging. It's a case where you might have models to predict something and different parts of it, but you still need to bring it all together.

One of the other things to think about too is that you need the data to build the models. You have to incorporate data from all sorts of different sensors and different sorts of teams, and so that heightens the challenge.

How can engineers use AI to better prepare and extract insights from hardware or sensor data?

Gorr: We always think about using AI to predict something or do some robot task, but you can use AI to come up with patterns and pick out things you might not have noticed before on your own. People will use AI when they have high-frequency data coming from many different sensors, and a lot of times it’s useful to explore the frequency domain and things like data synchronization or resampling. Those can be really challenging if you’re not sure where to start.

One of the things I would say is, use the tools that are available. There’s a vast community of people working on these things, and you can find lots of examples [of applications and techniques] on GitHub or MATLAB Central, where people have shared nice examples, even little apps they’ve created. I think many of us are buried in data and just not sure what to do with it, so definitely take advantage of what’s already out there in the community. You can explore and see what makes sense to you, and bring in that balance of domain knowledge and the insight you get from the tools and AI.

What should engineers and designers consider when using AI for chip design?

Gorr: Think through what problems you’re trying to solve or what insights you might hope to find, and try to be clear about that. Consider all of the different components, and document and test each of those different parts. Consider all of the people involved, and explain and hand off in a way that is sensible for the whole team.

How do you think AI will affect chip designers’ jobs?

Gorr: It’s going to free up a lot of human capital for more advanced tasks. We can use AI to reduce waste, to optimize the materials, to optimize the design, but then you still have that human involved whenever it comes to decision-making. I think it’s a great example of people and technology working hand in hand. It’s also an industry where all people involved—even on the manufacturing floor—need to have some level of understanding of what’s happening, so this is a great industry for advancing AI because of how we test things and how we think about them before we put them on the chip.

How do you envision the future of AI and chip design?

Gorr: It's very much dependent on that human element—involving people in the process and having that interpretable model. We can do many things with the mathematical minutiae of modeling, but it comes down to how people are using it, how everybody in the process is understanding and applying it. Communication and involvement of people of all skill levels in the process are going to be really important. We’re going to see less of those superprecise predictions and more transparency of information, sharing, and that digital twin—not only using AI but also using our human knowledge and all of the work that many people have done over the years.


Match ID: 173 Score: 3.57 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 102 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google

7 Free Websites Every Content Creator Needs to Know
Thu, 27 Jan 2022 15:19:00 +0000
Do you have the desire to become a content creator, but not have the money to start? Here are 7 free websites every content creator needs to know.

1.Exploding Topics (Trending Topics)

Exploding Topics
(Photo Credit:- Exploding Topics)

If you're a content creator, you might be wondering what better way to find new topic ideas than to see what people are searching for? This tool gives you this data without anyone else's explanation. It provides related hashtags and tips on how to use them effectively in your posts. It's a great tool for anyone who wants to keep up to date with what's most relevant in their niche. You can also see the most popular hashtags by country, making it easier to understand cross-border and demographic trends. This site makes your search for content easier than ever! There are countless ways to use explosive topics to your advantage as a content creator. 

Some examples can be:

  • Use the most popular hashtags and keywords to get inspiration for ideas.
  •  Find out what people are talking about in real-time.
  •  Find new audiences you may not have known were interested in your topic.

There’s no excuse not to try this website — it’s free and easy to use!

Visit Exploding Topics From Here

2. Headline Studio (Headline Grader)

Headline Studio
(Photo Credit:-Headline Studio)

Headline Studio allows you to create catchy headlines for your content. After writing a title there is data on how often people view articles with similar titles and why they are involved with them.

This is a valuable tool when creating new blog posts because it generates catchy headlines for your blog post to catch a reader’s attention.

Visit Headline Studio From Here

3. Answer the public

Answer The Public
(Photo Credit:- Answer The Public)

Answer The public is an excellent tool for content creators. It gives you insight into what people are asking on social media sites and communities and lets you guess about topics that matter to your audience. Answer the public allows you to enter a keyword or topic related to your niche and it will show results with popular questions and keywords related to your topic. It's an amazing way to get insights into what people are searching online and allows you to identify topics driven by new blog posts or social media content on platforms like Facebook, Instagram, Youtube, and Twitter as well as the types of questions they ask and  also want answers.

Visit Answer The Public From Here


4. Surfer Seo (SEO Ranking)

Surfer Seo
(Photo Credit:-Surfer Seo)


With this tool, content creators can quickly and easily check the ranking of their websites and those of other competitors. This tool allows you to see how your website compares to others in different categories, including: 

  • Rank Potential
  • Organic Search Ranking

Surfer Seo is free and the interface is very friendly. It's a great tool for anyone who wants to do quick competitor research or check their site's rankings at any time.

Visit SurferSeo From Here

5. Canva (Templates/Graphics)

Canva
(Photo Credit:- Canva)


Canva is a free graphic design platform that makes it easy to create invitations, business cards, mobile videos, Instagram posts, Instagram stories, flyers, and more with professionally designed templates. You can even upload your photos and drag and drop them into Canva templates. It's like having a basic version of Photoshop. You can also remove background from images with one click.

Canva offers thousands of free, professionally designed templates that can be customized with just a few clicks. Simply upload your photos to Canva, drag them into the template of your choice, and save the file to your computer.

It is free to use for basic use but if you want access to different fonts or more features, then you need to buy a premium plan.

Visit Canva From Here

6. Facebook Audience Insights (Audience Research)

Facebook Audience Insights
(Photo Credit:- Facebook Audience Insights

Facebook Audience Insights is a powerful tool for content creators when researching their target market. This can help you understand the demographics, interests, and behaviors of your target audience. This information helps determine the direction of your content so that it resonates with them. The most important tools to consider in Facebook Audience Insights are Demographics and Behavior. These two sections provide you with valuable information about your target market, such as their age and from where they belong, how much time they spend on social media per day, what devices they use to access it, etc.

There is another section of Facebook Audits that is very helpful. This will let you know the interests, hobbies, and activities that people in your target market are most interested in. You can use this information to create content for them about things they will be about as opposed to topics they may not be so keen on.

Visit Facebook Audience Insights From Here

7. Pexels (Images)

Pexel
(Photo Credit: Pixel

Pexels is a warehouse for any content creator with millions of free royalty images who wants to find high-quality images that can be used freely without having to worry about permissions or licensing so you are free to use the photos in your content and also there is no watermark on photos

The only cons are that some photos contain people, and Pexels doesn't allow you to remove people from photos. Search your keyword and download as many as you want!

Visit Pexel From Here


So there you have it. We hope that these specially curated websites will come in handy for content creators and small businesses alike. If you've got a site that should be on this list, let us know! And if you're looking for more content creator resources, then let us know in the comments section below




Match ID: 174 Score: 3.57 source: www.crunchhype.com age: 114 days
qualifiers: 3.57 google

Stocks to Watch: DuPont, Nike, KB Home are stocks to watch
Fri, 27 Jun 2014 09:48:27 GMT
Among the companies whose shares are expected to see active trade in Friday’s session are DuPont, Nike, and KB Home.

Match ID: 175 Score: 3.57 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 2885 days
qualifiers: 3.57 trade

Stocks to Watch: Bed Bath & Beyond, GoPro, Nike are stocks to watch
Thu, 26 Jun 2014 09:30:24 GMT
Among the companies whose shares are expected to see active trade in Thursday’s session are Bed Bath & Beyond, GoPro, and Nike.

Match ID: 176 Score: 3.57 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 2886 days
qualifiers: 3.57 trade

Stocks to Watch: Stocks to watch: Oracle, Smith & Wesson, Family Dollar
Fri, 20 Jun 2014 10:42:33 GMT
Among the companies whose shares are expected to see active trade in Friday’s session are Oracle, Smith & Wesson, and Family Dollar.

Match ID: 177 Score: 3.57 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 2892 days
qualifiers: 3.57 trade

Stocks to Watch: BlackBerry, Oracle, Kroger are stocks to watch
Thu, 19 Jun 2014 10:01:11 GMT
Among the companies whose shares are expected to see active trade in Thursday’s session are BlackBerry, Oracle, and Kroger.

Match ID: 178 Score: 3.57 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 2893 days
qualifiers: 3.57 trade

Stocks to Watch: FedEx, Jabil, Red Hat are stocks to watch
Wed, 18 Jun 2014 09:30:21 GMT
Among the companies whose shares are expected to see active trade in Wednesday’s session are FedEx, Jabil Circuit, and Red Hat.

Match ID: 179 Score: 3.57 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 2894 days
qualifiers: 3.57 trade

Stocks to Watch: Covidien, Medtronic, are stocks to watch
Mon, 16 Jun 2014 12:05:28 GMT
Among the companies whose shares are expected to see active trade in Monday’s session are Covidien, Medtronic and Layne Christensen and Korn/Ferry International.

Match ID: 180 Score: 3.57 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 2896 days
qualifiers: 3.57 trade

Stocks to Watch: Lululemon, Finisar, Target are stocks to watch
Thu, 12 Jun 2014 10:24:41 GMT
Among the companies whose shares are expected to see active trade in Thursday’s session are Lululemon Athletica, Finisar, and Target.

Match ID: 181 Score: 3.57 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 2900 days
qualifiers: 3.57 trade

Wireless Heater Made From a Leaf Skeleton Is Fully Biodegradable
Tue, 10 May 2022 21:11:22 +0000


We’ve gotten very, very good at making things that are cheap and durable. Unfortunately, there are some deleterious side effects. Among them: Our society generates massive amounts of waste that is going to remain in landfills for a long time. What’s more, the process of making these goods is also bad for the environment, considering raw materials, refining, supply chain, packaging, and so on. It’s horrendous, if you think about it, which is why most of us tend not to think about it. Realistically, making everything eco-friendly isn’t practical, but making some things eco-friendly is—even for a very strict definition of eco-friendly that takes the availability of raw materials, reusability, and eventual disposal into account.

Researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, and Accenture Labs are putting this idea to the test with the design of a wireless heater that can warm up whatever’s placed inside of it when the heater is placed on a standard wireless charging pad. This recyclable heater, made from paper, bits of shellfish, silver nanowires, and leaf skeletons, can warm a batch of cookies to 70 °C, but will degrade into compost in just a few months.


We believe that there exists a space of “semi-permanent” technological design that biological, decomposable materials are well-suited for… If we prioritize the decomposability of materials in our design, can we design interfaces that are durable and have enhanced functionality without sacrificing the convenience of responsible disposability? —Katherine W. Song et al.

A quick word about things that are “biodegradable”: The words “biodegradable,” “compostable,” and ecological buzzwords don’t actually have meanings that are all that consistent (or useful) when applied to commercial products. The issue is that while some things might technically have the capacity to degrade under natural conditions, that process may require very specific conditions or might take so much time that it’s not practical for most end users. For the Berkeley-Accenture project, the researchers use the terms “decomposable” and “backyard-degradable” to emphasize that this thing really will turn into dirt in a matter of months if you bury it in your yard.

A series of three images showing a coated leaf skeleton, an envelope heater, and a decomposing heater in dirt

The framework for the heater is the skeleton of a fig leaf. The researchers chose that because it provides a fine branching structure to distribute heat across a wide area. While you can skeletonize leaves by yourself without much trouble, you can also just buy the preprocessed version on Amazon, because of course you can. Each leaf skeleton is coated with a chitosan gel, which is a polymer derived from discarded shellfish pieces like shrimp shells. The coating keeps the skeleton stable. The denuded leaf skeleton is then dipped into silver nanowires, also purchasable off the shelf. The final step is attaching a couple of leaves onto a kraft paper bag with paper tape, and wiring them together with nontoxic, conductive silver ink. Drawing a silver antenna so the device can receive power wirelessly completes the packaging. Nontoxic thermochromic pigment can be added as a temperature indicator.

That copper coil you see in the video isn’t backyard-degradable, but it’s a stand-in for a coil printed with silver ink, which is an existing technology that the researchers just weren’t focusing on for the purposes of this project. Remarkably, the thing that takes the longest to degrade is the leaf itself, but it should complete its transformation into dirt in about a year.

A series of three images showing the leaf heater progressively decomposing into dirt Left: packaging before being buried in soil on day 1. Middle: packaging dug up after 15 days. Right: packaging dug up after 30 days.

A heating envelope like this can be used in numerous ways. The researchers were able to successfully warm up a chocolate chip cookie and a stroopwafel to the point of ideal gooeyness. And if that isn’t enough (it totally should be), they also suggest that their heater could be used to do things like pasteurize milk or juice, warm up wax strips, activate shape-changing elements, and even activate thermally expanding foam to create an envelope that could generate customized protection for whatever is inside. And phones with bidirectional charging could make these heaters easy to use wherever you happen to be.

“Our argument is only that through the novel usage of selected decomposable materials, limited but useful electronic technologies can be designed and put into operation.” —Katherine W. Song et al.

If some of these applications seem wasteful, don’t worry, because all of the materials are cheap, more or less readily available, straightforward to assemble, and will return themselves to nature in a harmless way in just a couple of months. This really requires a shift in thinking about what waste is, and what wasteful really means—the heater presented here shows that it’s possible to prioritize natural and backyard-degradable materials and structures in the design of at least some products, a design and manufacturing philosophy that offers a unique application space, and perhaps an entirely new category of semipermanent electronics that we can use and discard guilt-free.

“Towards Decomposable Interactive Systems: Design of a Backyard-Degradable Wireless Heating Interface,” by Katherine W. Song, Aditi Maheshwari, Eric M. Gallo, Andreea Danielescu, and Eric Paulos, was presented at CHI 2022.


Match ID: 182 Score: 2.86 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 11 days
qualifiers: 1.43 california, 1.43 amazon

A Helicopter Will Try to Catch a Rocket Booster in Midair
Mon, 18 Apr 2022 18:28:03 +0000


The longest journey begins with a single step, and that step gets expensive when you’re in the space business. Take, for example, the Electron booster made by Rocket Lab, a company with two launch pads on the New Zealand coast and another awaiting use in Virginia. Earth’s gravity is so stubborn that, by necessity, two-thirds of the rocket is its first stage—and it has historically ended up as trash on the ocean floor after less than 3 minutes of flight.

Making those boosters reusable—saving them from a saltwater grave, and therefore saving a lot of money—has been a goal of aerospace engineers since the early space age. Elon Musk’s SpaceX has famously been landing its Falcon 9 boosters on drone ships off the Florida coast—mind-bending to watch but very hard to pull off.

Rocket Lab says it has another way. Iits next flight will carry 34 commercial satellites—and instead of being dropped in the Pacific, the spent first stage will be snared in midair by a helicopter as it descends by parachute. It will then be brought back to base, seared by the heat of reentry but inwardly intact, for possible refurbishment and reuse. The team, in its determination to minimize its odds of dropping the ball, so to speak, has pushed back the launch several times in order to wait out inclement weather. They reason that because this isn’t a game of horseshoes, close is not good enough.

“It’s a very complex thing to do,” says Morgan Bailey of Rocket Lab. “You have to position the helicopter in exactly the right spot, you have to know exactly where the stage is going to be coming down, you have to be able to slow it enough,” she says. “We’ve practiced and practiced all of the individual puzzle pieces, and now it’s putting them together. It’s not a foregone conclusion that the first capture attempt will be a success.”

Still, people in the space business will be watching, since Rocket Lab has established a niche for itself as a viable space company. This will be its 26th Electron launch. The company says it has launched 112 satellites so far, many of them so-called smallsats that are relatively inexpensive to fly. “Right now, there are two companies taking payloads to orbit: SpaceX and Rocket Lab,” says Chad Anderson, CEO of Space Capital, a firm that funds space startups.

Here's the flight profile. The Electron is 18 meters tall; the bottom 12 meters are the first stage. For this mission it will lift off from New Zealand on its way to a sun-synchronous orbit 520 kilometers high. The first stage burns out after the first 70 km. Two minutes and 32 seconds into the flight, it drops off, following a long arc that in the past would have sent it crashing into the ocean, about 280 km downrange.

But Rocket Lab has now equipped its booster with heat shielding, protecting it as it falls tail-first at up to 8,300 kilometers per hour. Temperatures should reach 2,400 °C as the booster is slowed by the air around it.

At an altitude of 13 km, a small drogue parachute is deployed from the top end of the rocket stage, followed by a main chute at about 6 km, less than a minute later. The parachute slows the rocket substantially, so that it is soon descending at only about 36 km/h.

Rendering of helicopter after catching the spent Electron rocket first stage in midair. An artist’s conception shows the helicopter after catching the spent Electron rocket’s first stage in midair.Rocket Lab

But even that would make for a hard splashdown—which is why a Sikorsky S-92 helicopter hovers over the landing zone, trailing a grappling hook on a long cable. The plan is for the helicopter to fly over the descending rocket and snag the parachute cables. The rocket never gets wet; the chopper secures it and either lowers it onto a ship or carries it back to land. Meanwhile—let’s not lose sight of the prime mission—the second stage of the rocket should reach orbit about 10 minutes after launch.

“You have to keep the booster out of the water,” says Anderson. “If they can do that, it’s a big deal.” Many space people will recall NASA’s solid rocket boosters, which helped launch the space shuttles and then parachuted into the Atlantic; towing them back to port and cleaning them up for reuse was slow and expensive. NASA’s giant SLS rocket uses the same boosters, but there are no plans to recover them.

So midair recovery is far better, though it’s not new. As long ago as 1960, the U.S. Air Force snagged a returning capsule from a mission called Discoverer 14. But that had nothing to do with economy; the Discoverers were actually Corona reconnaissance satellites, and they were sending back film of the Soviet Union—priceless for Cold War intelligence.

Rocket Lab tries to sound more playful about its missions: It gives them names like “A Data With Destiny” or “Without Mission a Beat.” This newest flight, with its booster-recovery attempt, is called “There and Back Again.”

A teenager tweeted to CEO Peter Beck: “It would have been cool if the mission was called ‘Catch Me If You Can.’”

“Oh…that’s good!” Beck replied. “Congratulations, you have just named the very next recovery mission.”

Update 22 April 2022: In a tweet, Rocket Lab announced that due to weather, the planned launch and recovery would be rescheduled for 27 April at the earliest.


Match ID: 183 Score: 2.86 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 33 days
qualifiers: 2.14 musk, 0.71 startup

To Catch a Falling Satellite
Mon, 14 Mar 2022 16:55:14 +0000


It is the fate of many a dead satellite to spend its last years tumbling out of control. A fuel line may burst, or solar wind may surge, or there may be drag from the outer reaches of the atmosphere—and unless a spacecraft has been designed in some way that keeps it naturally stable, chances are good that it will begin to turn end over end.

That’s a problem, because Earth orbit is getting more and more crowded. Engineers would like to corral old pieces of space junk, but they can’t safely reach them, especially if they’re unstable. The European Space Agency says there are about 30,000 “debris objects” now being tracked in Earth orbit—derelict satellites, spent rocket stages, pieces sent flying from collisions in space. There may also be 900,000 smaller bits of orbital debris—everything from loose bolts to flecks of paint to shards of insulation. They may be less than 10 centimeters long, but they can still destroy a healthy satellite if they hit at orbital speeds.

“With more satellites being launched, we might encounter more situations where we have a defunct satellite that’s occupying a valuable orbit,” says Richard Linares, an assistant professor of aeronautics and astronautics at MIT. He’s part of an American-German project, called TumbleDock/ROAM, researching ways to corral and stabilize tumbling satellites so they can be deorbited or, in some cases, perhaps even refueled or repaired.

Engineers have put up with orbital debris for decades, but Linares says the picture is changing. For one thing, satellite technology is becoming more and more affordable—just look at SpaceX, which has been launching 40 satellites a week so far this year. For another, he says, the economic benefits those satellites offer—high-speed internet, GPS, climate and crop monitoring and other applications—will be threatened if the risk of impacts keeps growing.

“I think in the next few years we’ll have the technology to do something about space debris,” says Linares. “And there are economic drivers that will incentivize companies to do this.”

The TumbleDock/ROAM team has just finished a series of tests in the cabin of the International Space Station, using NASA robots called Astrobees to stand in for a tumbling satellite and a “chaser” spacecraft sent to catch it. The goal: to figure out algorithms so that a chaser can find its target, determine its tumble rates, and calculate the safest and most efficient approach to it.

Astrobee robot experiment aboard the ISS to reach a tumbling target in space. www.youtube.com

“There’s a massive amount of large debris out there,” says Keenan Albee, a Ph.D. student on the team at MIT. “Look at some of them, with large solar panels that are ready to whack you if you don’t do the approach correctly.”

The researchers decided early on that a chase vehicle needs enough autonomy to close in on a disabled satellite on its own. Even the largest satellites are too distant for ground-based tracking stations to track their attitude with any precision. A chaser, perhaps equipped with navigation cameras, lidar, and other sensors, will need to do the job in real time.

“The tumbling motion of a satellite can be quite complex,” says Roberto Lampariello, the principal investigator on the project at the German Aerospace Center, or DLR. “And if you want to be sure you are not going to collide with any appendages while approaching the mating point, having an autonomous method of guidance is, I think, very attractive.”

The Astrobee tests on the space station showed that it can be done, at least in principle. Each Astrobee robot is a cube, about 30 centimeters on a side, with navigation cameras, compressed-air thrusters, and Snapdragon processors much like what you would find in a smartphone. For the latest test, last month, NASA astronaut Mark Vande Hei set up two Astrobees a couple of meters apart. They then took their commands from Albee on the ground. He started the test runs, with one robot tumbling and the other trying to rendezvous with it. There have been glitches; the Astrobees needed help determining their precise location relative to the station walls. But the results of the tests were promising.

A next step, say the researchers, is to determine how best for a chase spacecraft to grapple its target, which is especially difficult if it’s a piece of debris with no docking mechanism. Other plans over the years have involved big nets or lasers; TumbleDock/ROAM team members say they’re intrigued by grippers that use van der Waals forces between atoms, the kinds that help a gecko cling to a sheer surface.

The larger question is how to turn experiments like these into actual solutions to a growing, if lofty, problem. Low Earth orbit has been crowded enough, for long enough, that satellite makers add shielding to their vehicles and space agencies continuously scan the skies to prevent close calls. No space travelers have been killed, and there have only been a few cases in which satellites were actually pulverized. But the problem has become increasingly expensive and, in some cases, dangerous. SpaceX has launched 2,000 Starlink Internet satellites so far, may launch 30,000 more, and has other companies (like Amazon) racing to keep up. They see profits up there.

MIT’s Linares says that, in fact, is why it’s worth figuring out the space-junk problem. “There’s a reason why those orbits are valuable,” he says. Companies may spend billions to launch new satellites—and don’t want them threatened by old satellites.

“If your company’s benefiting from an orbit band,” he says, “then you’d probably better get someone to clean it up for you.”


Match ID: 184 Score: 2.86 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 68 days
qualifiers: 1.43 apple, 1.43 amazon

NASA Awards Contracts for Rotorcraft Vertical Lift Technology Services
Tue, 14 Dec 2021 16:15 EST
NASA has awarded multiple contracts to provide rotorcraft vertical lift technology development research and development support at the agency’s Ames Research Center in California's Silicon Valley.
Match ID: 185 Score: 2.86 source: www.nasa.gov age: 158 days
qualifiers: 1.43 development, 1.43 california

Alas, Elon Musk May Have a Point About Trump’s Twitter Ban
Wed, 11 May 2022 18:45:27 +0000
It’s probably not a good idea for important platforms to be in the business of frequently banning users for life.
Match ID: 186 Score: 2.14 source: www.wired.com age: 10 days
qualifiers: 2.14 musk

How Flyback Rocket Boosters Got Off the Ground
Mon, 21 Mar 2022 20:27:59 +0000


In the popular conception of a technological breakthrough, a flash of genius is followed quickly by commercial or industrial success, public acclaim, and substantial wealth for a small group of inventors and backers. In the real world, it almost never works out that way.

Advances that seem to appear suddenly are often backed by decades of development. Consider steam engines. Starting in the second quarter of the 19th century they began powering trains, and they soon revolutionized the transportation of people and goods. But steam engines themselves had been invented at the beginning of the 18th century. For 125 years they had been used to pump water out of mines and then to power the mills of the Industrial Revolution.


Lately we’ve become accustomed to seeing rocket boosters return to Earth and then land vertically, on their tails, ready to be serviced and flown again. (Much the same majestic imagery thrilled sci-fi moviegoers in the 1950s.) Today, both SpaceX and Blue Origin are using these techniques, and a third startup, Relativity Space, is on the verge of joining them. Such reusable rocketry is already cutting the cost of access to space and, with other advances yet to come, will help make it possible for humanity to return to the moon and eventually to travel to Mars.

Vertical landings, too, have a long history, with the same ground being plowed many times by multiple research organizations. From 1993 to 1996 a booster named DCX, for Delta Clipper Experimental, took off and landed vertically eight times at White Sands Missile Range. It flew to a height of only 2,500 meters, but it successfully negotiated the very tricky dynamics of landing a vertical cylinder on its end.

The key innovations that made all this possible happened 50 or more years ago. And those in turn built upon the invention a century ago of liquid-fueled rockets that can be throttled up or down by pumping more or less fuel into a combustion chamber.

In August 1954 the Rolls-Royce Thrust Measuring Rig, also known as the “flying bedstead,” took off and landed vertically while carrying a pilot. The ungainly contraption had two downward-pointing Rolls-Royce jet engines with nozzles that allowed the pilot to vector the thrust and control the flight. By 1957 another company, Hawker Siddeley, started work on turning this idea into a vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) fighter jet. It first flew in 1967 and entered service in 1969 as the Harrier Jump Jet, with new Rolls-Royce engines specifically designed for thrust vectoring. Thrust vectoring is a critical component of control for all of today’s reusable rocket boosters.

During the 1960s another rig, also nicknamed the flying bedstead, was developed in the United States for training astronauts to land on the moon. There was a gimbaled rocket engine that always pointed directly downward, providing thrust equal to five-sixths of the vehicle and the pilot’s weight, simulating lunar gravity. The pilot then controlled the thrust and direction of another rocket engine to land the vehicle safely.

It was not all smooth flying. Neil Armstrong first flew the trainer in March 1967, but he was nearly killed in May 1968 when things went awry and he had to use the ejection seat to rocket to safety. The parachute deployed and he hit the ground just 4 seconds later. Rocket-powered vertical descent was harder than it looked.

Vertical rocket landings have a long history, with the same ground being plowed many times by multiple research organizations.

Nevertheless, between 1969 and 1972, Armstrong and then five other astronauts piloted lunar modules to vertical landings on the moon. There were no ejection seats, and these have been the only crewed rocket-powered landings on a spaceflight. All other humans lofted into space have used Earth’s atmosphere to slow down, combining heat shields with either wings or parachutes.

In the early days of Blue Origin, the company returned to the flying-bedstead approach, and its vehicle took off and landed successfully in March 2005. It was powered by four jet engines, once again from Rolls-Royce, bought secondhand from the South African Air Force. Ten years later, in November 2015, Blue Origin’s New Shepard booster reached an altitude of 100 kilometers and then landed vertically. A month later SpaceX had its first successful vertical landing of a Falcon-9 booster.

Today’s reusable, or flyback, boosters also use something called grid fins, those honeycombed panels sticking out perpendicularly from the top of a booster that guide the massive cylinder as it falls through the atmosphere unpowered. The fins have an even longer history, as they have been part of every crewed Soyuz launch since the 1960s. They guide the capsule back to Earth if there’s an abort during the climb to orbit. They were last used in October 2018 when a Soyuz failed at 50 km up. The cosmonaut and astronaut who were aboard landed safely and had a successful launch in another Soyuz five months later.

The next big accomplishment will be crewed vertical landings, 50 years after mankind's last one, on the moon. It will almost certainly happen before this decade is out.

I’m less confident that we’ll see general-purpose quantum computers and abundant electricity from nuclear fusion in that time frame. But I’m pretty sure we’ll eventually get there with both. The arc of technology development is often long. And sometimes, the longer it is, the more revolutionary it is in the end.

This article appears in the April 2022 print issue as “The Long Road to Overnight Success .”


Match ID: 187 Score: 2.14 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 61 days
qualifiers: 1.43 development, 0.71 startup

Eviation’s Maiden Flight Could Usher in Electric Aviation Era
Mon, 07 Feb 2022 19:01:19 +0000


The first commercial all-electric passenger plane is just weeks away from its maiden flight, according to its maker Israeli startup Eviation. If successful, the nine-seater Alice aircraft would be the most compelling demonstration yet of the potential for battery-powered flight. But experts say there’s still a long way to go before electric aircraft makes a significant dent in the aviation industry.

The Alice is currently undergoing high-speed taxi tests at Arlington Municipal Airport close to Seattle, says Eviation CEO Omer Bar-Yohay. This involves subjecting all of the plane’s key systems and fail-safe mechanisms to a variety of different scenarios to ensure they are operating as expected before its first flight. The company is five or six good weather days away from completing those tests, says Bar-Yohay, after which the plane should be cleared for takeoff. Initial flights won’t push the aircraft to its limits, but the Alice should ultimately be capable of cruising speeds of 250 knots (463 kilometers per hour) and a maximum range of 440 nautical miles (815 kilometers).

Electric aviation has received considerable attention in recent years as the industry looks to reduce its carbon emissions. And while the Alice won’t be the first all-electric aircraft to take to the skies, Bar-Yohay says it will be the first designed with practical commercial applications in mind. Eviation plans to offer three configurations—a nine-seater commuter model, a six-seater executive model for private jet customers, and a cargo version with a capacity of 12.74 cubic meters. The company has already received advance orders from logistics giant DHL and Massachusetts-based regional airline Cape Air.

“It’s not some sort of proof-of-concept or demonstrator,” says Bar-Yohay. “It’s the first all-electric with a real-life mission, and I think that’s the big differentiator.”

Getting there has required a major engineering effort, says Bar-Yohay, because the requirements for an all-electric plane are very different from those of conventional aircraft. The biggest challenge is weight, thanks to the fact that batteries provide considerably less mileage to the pound compared to energy-dense jet fuels.

That makes slashing the weight of other components a priority and the plane features lightweight composite materials “where no composite has gone before,”’, says Bar-Yohay. The company has also done away with the bulky mechanical systems used to adjust control surfaces on the wings, and replaced them with a much lighter fly-by-wire system that uses electronic actuators controlled via electrical wires.

The company’s engineers have had to deal with a host of other complications too, from having to optimize the aerodynamics to the unique volume and weight requirements dictated by the batteries to integrating brakes designed for much heavier planes. “There is just so much optimization, so many specific things that had to be solved,” says Bar-Yohay. “In some cases, there are just no components out there that do what you need done, which weren’t built for a train, or something like that.”

Despite the huge amount of work that’s gone into it, Bar-Yohay says the Alice will be comparable in price to similar sized turboprop aircraft like the Beechcraft King Air and cheaper than small business jets like the Embraer Phenom 300. And crucially, he adds, the relative simplicity of electrical motors and actuators compared with mechanical control systems and turboprops or jets means maintenance costs will be markedly lower.

Aircraft in the sky with white clouds below it This is a conceptual rendering of Eviation's Alice, the first commercial all-electric passenger plane, in flight.Eviation

Combined with the lower cost of electricity compared to jet fuel, and even accounting for the need to replace batteries every 3,000 flight hours, Eviation expects Alice’s operating costs to be about half those of similar sized aircraft.

But there are question marks over whether the plane has an obvious market, says aviation analyst Richard Aboulafia, managing director at AeroDynamic Advisory. It’s been decades since anyone has built a regional commuter with less than 70 seats, he says, and most business jets typically require more than the 440 nautical mile range the Alice offers. Scaling up to bigger aircraft or larger ranges is also largely out of the company’s hands as it will require substantial breakthroughs in battery technology. “You need to move on to a different battery chemistry,” he says. “There isn’t even a 10-year road map to get there.”

An aircraft like the Alice isn’t meant to be a straight swap for today’s short-haul aircraft though, says Lynette Dray, a research fellow at University College London who studies the decarbonization of aviation. More likely it would be used for short intercity hops or for creating entirely new route networks better suited to its capabilities.

This is exactly what Bar-Yohay envisages, with the Alice’s reduced operating costs opening up new short-haul routes that were previously impractical or uneconomical. It could even make it feasible to replace larger jets with several smaller ones, he says, allowing you to provide more granular regional travel by making use of the thousands of runways around the country currently used only for recreational aviation.

The economics are far from certain though, says Dray, and if the ultimate goal is to decarbonize the aviation sector, it’s important to remember that aircraft are long-lived assets. In that respect, sustainable aviation fuels that can be used by existing aircraft are probably a more promising avenue.

Even if the Alice’s maiden flight goes well, it still faces a long path to commercialization, says Kiruba Haran, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Aviation’s stringent safety requirements mean the company must show it can fly the aircraft for a long period, over and over again without incident, which has yet to be done with an all-electric plane at this scale.

Nonetheless, if the maiden flight goes according to plan it will be a major milestone for electric aviation, says Haran. “It’s exciting, right?” he says. “Anytime we do something more than, or further than, or better than, that’s always good for the industry.”

And while battery-powered electric aircraft may have little chance of disrupting the bulk of commercial aviation in the near-term, Haran says hybrid schemes that use a combination of batteries and conventional fuels (or even hydrogen) to power electric engines could have more immediate impact. The successful deployment of the Alice could go a long way to proving the capabilities of electric propulsion and building momentum behind the technology, says Haran.

“There are still a lot of skeptics out there,” he says. “This kind of flight demo will hopefully help bring those people along.”


Match ID: 188 Score: 2.14 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 103 days
qualifiers: 1.43 seattle, 0.71 startup

The Race for the Next-Gen Space Station
Thu, 16 Dec 2021 18:31:22 +0000


Since November 2000, there have always have been a select few people living apart from the rest of us—the astronauts and cosmonauts on the International Space Station. On any list of humanity’s greatest engineering achievements, the ISS almost always ranks near the top. It is as long as a football field, as spacious as a jumbo jet. It has made more than 123,000 orbits in 21 years.

And it’s hard to find news stories today that don’t say it’s showing its age.

ISS Set the Standard


A photo of the ISS, as a sunrise shines through one of the 16 solar panel housings flanking the space station's central modules.

The International Space Station—originally expected to be completed by 1994 for $8 billion—was completed in 2011 for more than $100 billion. Its mission may be extended till 2030.

NASA


The station is slowly leaking air, presumably from stress cracks in its hull that crew members have struggled to locate, and it’s getting increasingly expensive to maintain as parts wear out. NASA is officially supposed to retire the ISS by 2024, though it says that can probably be pushed back to 2030. Meanwhile, it’s trying to get the next station into orbit as quickly as possible.

So what might a new station look like? And who will lead the charge?

NASA has now awarded US $415.6 million to three aerospace consortiums to develop a new “commercial low Earth orbit destination.” One team is led by Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin, another by the satellite company Nanoracks, and the third by the aerospace giant Northrop Grumman. NASA’s plan, for some years, has been for private industry to take over the routine work of space operations, with NASA as “one of many paying customers.” If it works—as it has in the case of SpaceX ferrying astronauts to and from the ISS—NASA says it will save billions of dollars and free the agency to go explore the cosmos.

Northrop Grumman’s Free Flyer


Illustration of space station in orbit around earth. Station includes four vertical solar panels extending up and down from the main module alongside eight more horizontal panels. A SpaceX Dragon crew capsule is docked to station.

The Dulles, Va.-based Northrop Grumman has proposed a space station concept that features elements in development for other projects. Note the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft docked at bottom center.

Northrop Grumman

Starlab 


Illustration of a space station with four long solar panels in an \u201cX\u201d arrangement attached to a module, the rightmost half of which is inflatable.

Starlab, from Nanoracks, Voyager Space, and Lockheed Martin, is a free-flying commercial space station concept. The largest module is inflatable.

Nanoracks/Lockheed Martin/Voyager Space

Orbital Reef, First Stages


Image of space station against the back blackdrop of space. A crew module approaches the station from the left, while a central cylinder is joined by a perpendicular cylinder and an inflated spheroid on the far side.

Illustration of the first components of Blue Origin and Sierra Nevada’s proposed Orbital Reef space station in orbit.

Blue Origin/Sierra Nevada

SpaceX’s “Station”?


Artist's conception of the SpaceX Starship on the surface of the moon. SpaceX has said the same ship can be used for many purposes in Earth orbit and deep space.

SpaceX


“We don’t see, coming out of this, one winner,” says Jeffrey Manber, Nanoracks’ chair and co-founder. "We see, by the end of this decade, multiple, privately owned space stations.”

There is a fourth contender, by the way: Axiom Space, a startup company, signed a contract in 2020 to build at least one new module for the ISS by mid-decade. When the time comes, Axiom says, it would detach its components and reconfigure them with other parts for a new station.

“If the ISS is extended to 2030, this will ensure that we don’t have a gap in our access to low Earth orbit,” said Philip McAlister, NASA’s director of commercial spaceflight.

But the race to avoid that gap may have already been lost—and if that warning seems ominous, it also comes from the space agency’s own in-house watchdog, the Office of Inspector General, or OIG.

“In our judgment, even if early design maturation is achieved in 2025—a challenging prospect in itself—a commercial platform is not likely to be ready until well after 2030,” the OIG said in an audit report. It said that without a working station, “the nascent low Earth orbit commercial space economy would likely collapse, causing cascading impacts to commercial space transportation capabilities, in-space manufacturing, and microgravity research.”

Remember, says the OIG, that the U.S. went nine years between the retirement of the space shuttles and the first SpaceX crew launch. And President Ronald Reagan originally proposed a space station by 1994 for $8 billion, but the ISS wasn’t finished until 2011 for more than $100 billion.

What’s more, new stations “might be obsolete before they’re even launched,” says Chad Anderson, a venture capitalist whose firm, Space Capital, has funded companies including Nanoracks. He wonders if SpaceX, which has been silent about its plans, might swoop in with its giant, reusable multipurpose Starship—launching laboratories and space factories, carrying tourists, doing almost everything a permanent space station could at a cost other contenders cannot match. Starship has already been picked as NASA’s next moon lander.

“They’re going to pull this off,” says Anderson. “The unit cost is just the cost of fuel. What is that? $50 million—that’s the same price people are paying per seat to go to the International Space Station right now.”

The competitors for NASA’s support say they can meet the challenge. They’d go in the opposite direction from SpaceX; their approach is not to get too ambitious.

Conceptually, their designs borrow heavily from the ISS, with cylindrical modules and photovoltaic panels docked together. Most of these components already exist or are well along in development. Some sections are visibly larger and more bulbous because they’d be folded up for launch and inflated in orbit. That’s an excellent way to fit more cabin space in the payload fairing of a rocket—but even that idea is decades old. An inflatable storage compartment, called BEAM, has been docked to the ISS since 2016.

“There’s nothing that’s going to prevent the technology from being there for the hardware that flies,” says Doug Cooke, a former associate administrator at NASA who was heavily involved in planning the ISS. “We have the history and the experience.”

The competitors say they can head off delays and deliver on price. “It’s much better than an order of magnitude less than what it cost to develop the International Space Station,” says Brent Sherwood of Blue Origin. “Most if not all of the challenges that need to be worked…have already been solved by the International Space Station program.”

The race goes to the swift, and to the inexpensive. What will win out? The proven approach? Or the revolutionary?


Match ID: 189 Score: 2.14 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 156 days
qualifiers: 1.43 development, 0.71 startup

Drone Startup to Fly Pallets Without Pilots
Thu, 16 Dec 2021 16:00:00 +0000


Delivering things by drone began as a stunt in 2012, when a model airplane dropped a burrito by parachute to a hungry customer waiting below. The concept then graduated, first to a proof-of-principle venture in Iceland using multicopters, then to a well-funded Amazon project in the United Kingdom. But these and similar attempts to solve the last-mile problem—the mile leading to the customer—have largely been disappointing. Amazon recently scaled back its drone-based delivery project in the U.K.

In 2022, Dronamics, a company based in London and Sofia, Bulgaria, will test-fly a drone in Europe that will carry far more than a mere burrito and over far longer distances. It addresses the less sexy but equally important middle-distance problem—the route that connects factories to warehouses. The point is to take a slice of business that’s now handled by regular air freight and by trucks—above all, the quick delivery of critical parts. If this service had been available a year or two ago, it might not have prevented the logistics logjam that now plagues the world, but it would have cleared away some of the more problematic bottlenecks.


Dronamics will run trials with its partners, including DHL and Hellmann Worldwide Logistics, in the hope of eventually fielding thousands of drones, each carrying as much as 350 kilograms of cargo up to 2,500 kilometers. The European Union has facilitated this sort of experimentation by instituting a single certification policy for drone aircraft. Once its aircraft are certified, Dronamics must get a route approved through one of the E.U.’s member countries; that done, it should be fairly easy to get other member countries to agree as well.

In October, Dronamics announced that it would use Malta as its base, with a view to connecting first to Italy and later to other Mediterranean countries.

One thing Dronamics doesn’t do is full-scale autonomy: Its planes do not detect and avoid obstacles. Instead, each flight is programmed in advance, in a purely deterministic way. Flights often take place in controlled airspace and always between drone ports that the company controls. Someone on the ground monitors the flight from afar, and if something unexpected arises, that person can redirect the plane.

“We operate like a proper airline, but we can intervene,” says Svilen Rangelov, the cofounder and CEO of Dronamics. “We’re looking for underserved airports, using time slots where there is no passenger traffic. In the United States there are 17,000 airports, but only about 400 are commercially used. The rest don’t have regular service at all.”

Unlike the multicopter burrito drones of years past, or even Amazon’s prototypes, these machines fly on fixed wings and are powered by internal combustion engines, the better to carry big loads long distances and to operate at off-the-grid airfields. “Anything less than 200 miles [about 320 kilometers] is not appropriate because, given the time to get to the airport, fly, and then pick up, you may as well truck it,” Rangelov says.

The company’s drone is called Black Swan, a phrase often used to describe important but unpredictable events. “That was precisely the reasoning” behind the name, Rangelov says, explaining what makes this drone so unique and rare. "We knew [the drone] had to be cheaper to produce and to operate than any existing models.”

The drone likely will not be carrying one pallet of the same things but multiple packages for many customers.

Because this vehicle is intended to transport cargo with no people on board, Dronamics could design the interior to fit cargo pallets. “It’s exactly the right cargo size for this business,” Rangelov says. “It likely will not be carrying one pallet of the same things but multiple packages for many customers.” And Dronamics claims it can carry cargo for half of what today’s air freighters charge.

Hellmann Worldwide Logistics sees a lot of potential for using Dronamics in Africa and other places with limited infrastructure. For now, though, the company is focused on the dense population, manageable distances, and supportive governmental institutions of Europe.

“Especially between north and south Europe—from Germany and Hungary, where there’s a lot of automotive business,” says Jan Kleine-Lasthues, Hellmann’s chief operating officer for air freight. There are also supply lines going into Italy that service the cruise ships on the Mediterranean Sea, he says, and fresh fish would be ideal cargo. Indeed, Dronamics is working on a temperature-controlled container.

What effect would massive fleets of such drones have had on today’s supply-chain problems? “It could help,” he says. “If the container isn’t arriving with production material, we could use drones to keep production alive. But it’s not replacing the big flow—it’s just a more flexible, more agile mode of transport.”

Before cargo drones darken the skies, though, Hellmann wants to see how the rollout goes.

“First of all, we want to try it,” Kleine-Lasthues says. “One use case is replacing commercial air freight—for example, Frankfurt to Barcelona by drone; also, there’s a use case replacing vans. If it is working, I think it can be quickly ramped up. The question is how fast can Dronamics add capacity to the market.”

This article appears in the January 2022 print issue as “Flying Pallets Without Pilots.”


Match ID: 190 Score: 2.14 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 156 days
qualifiers: 1.43 amazon, 0.71 startup

Made in Liverpool: This land is our land – video
Wed, 11 May 2022 12:28:07 GMT

Sue and Myra run a community centre at the heart of Kenny (Kensington) Fields in Liverpool. Their pantry offers residents affordable food, but also a sense of togetherness, pride, and plenty of laughs. But there is something missing: a feeling of control and security. With development spreading rapidly from Liverpool city centre, residents fear for the future of their community – and now they are starting to fight back.

This is the fifth episode of Made in Britain, a collaborative video journalism project looking at poverty, inequality and the challenges our communities face in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. The aim is to put the individuals who are typically under-represented in the media in front of and behind the camera. This episode was produced in collaboration with the organisations Feeding Liverpool and Church Action on Poverty.

Continue reading...
Match ID: 191 Score: 1.43 source: www.theguardian.com age: 10 days
qualifiers: 1.43 development

Scientists Build Ventricle-on-a-Chip to Study Heart Disease
Mon, 09 May 2022 16:21:10 +0000


In recent years, scientists have been using biomimetic tissue models—reconstructed tissues designed to replicate the attributes of living tissue—to study disease and development in the human body. The heart, however, is a different story. Even though advances in stem cell research now make it easier to grow cardiac tissue, replicating a functioning human heart in a lab remains complicated.

To address this gap, a multidisciplinary research team has developed a miniature replica of a heart chamber that brings together advanced stem-cell technologies and nanoengineering. Named the miniaturized Precision-enabled Unidirectional Microfluidic Pump (miniPUMP), the device comprises a hollow, microscopic, cylindrical scaffold built using precision 3D printing. This scaffold forms a framework for the cardiac tissue, which is made of heart muscle cells derived from human stem cells. The device mimics the lower heart chamber, the ventricle.

And just like a real heart, the tissue beats spontaneously, says Christos Michas, a biomedical researcher at Boston University and lead author of the study. The device is submerged in cell media containing glucose and other nutrients that the cells need to survive. “It’s possible to make the tissue beat by simulating [it] electrically, [but] you don’t need to. You just assemble it, and it just does its own thing,” he says.

The novelty of the miniPUMP, Michas explains, is the marrying of nanofabrication and tissue engineering in a way that hasn’t been considered before. “With the nanoengineered parts, we were able to replicate different aspects of the heart—specifically, the chamber, which contracts and then springs back, and also the valves that regulate the flow of the blood,” he says. They were thus able to mimic some aspects of heart function, such as pressure and the volume of fluid pumped, that has so far not been represented in research literature. “By doing that, we have access to more metrics of the performance of the heart, so we can have a better model of the heart.”

Apart from the convenience of having scaled-down organ models for research, the miniaturization of the device has further advantages, says coauthor Alice White, mechanical engineering chair at Boston University. First, it doesn’t use a lot of stem cells, which are a precious commodity. “[It] also means that we could maybe do lots of things in parallel in a relatively small space,” White says. The other big advantage, she adds, is that their mini heart chamber is compatible with other organ-on-a chip technologies that are being developed.

The chip in question, Michas explains, is a microfluidic chip that's lined with living human cells. The team used a 3D-printing technique called two-photon direct-laser writing, in which a biocompatible liquid resin solidifies in contact with the laser. “It didn’t really matter what the material was, as long as it could maintain its structure and have very fine features,” he adds. Precision fabrication was crucial given that many of the miniPUMP components were smaller than a dust particle, and the whole thing was smaller than a postage stamp.

In the foreground, purple gloved hands with tweezers hold a very small translucent square object. An out of focus face in the background looks at the object. A miniature replica of a heart chamber made from engineered parts and tissue from stem cells—and all contained on a chip not much bigger than a postage stamp—could help researchers study disease and test new treatments.Jackie Ricciardi/Boston University

One of the biggest challenges for the team was replicating the pumping function of the heart. “First of all, you need a cardiac chamber—something that resembles a balloon—so it can contain fluid,” says Michas. “[Arranging] the tissue on such a small scale, in a 3D format, is very challenging, because the tissue on its own would collapse into a sphere.” This is where the microengineered scaffold came into use.

The second aspect, Michas adds, is that the fluid must flow in a directional manner, just like it does in the heart. “That means that we had to have valves, but the valves that we would need for such a scaled-down system would be extremely sensitive to pressure.” Once again, fine-resolution 3D printing enabled that.

Animated gif of a pumping object and corresponding fluid being pumped. On the left, a chamber of the miniPUMP beats thanks to the contraction of the cardiac tissue. As the tissue beats, it ejects fluid out of the chamber [right]—just as a human heart would pump blood. Science Advances

Michas and his colleagues’ mini heart chamber continued to beat in the lab for three weeks. “We did not conduct a full study to see the effect of therapeutic treatments on the heart, but with the proper adjustments, I’m pretty confident that it will last for months,” Michas says.

This longevity, as well as replicating the natural beating mechanism of the heart muscle, provides scientists opportunities to study the heart as well as test the effectiveness of therapeutics with no risk to human patients. Apart from drug development and testing, Michas sees other possibilities too, such as disease modeling. “We know that in the case of hypertension, the heart, over time, changes the way it beats, how much blood it can pump, how fast it [does so],” he says. “So, if we want to understand this better and develop therapies, then we need to have easily accessible models to replicate it. The miniPUMP could be used for that [by controlling valve pressure]. That is one of the additional metrics that other systems usually lack.”

Another possibility, Michas says, is in developing advanced therapies, like gene therapies. “These allow us, again, to replicate a little bit of the process of those therapies and see if they [work] or not.” Lastly is modeling human development. “That is a very complicated scientific question, and models like this, to some extent, could help us better understand how the body forms during embryo development.”

The miniPUMP project is part of CELL-MET, a National Science Foundation–funded engineering research center exploring cellular metamaterials. “The goal of CELL-MET is to create a patch of functional heart tissue from a patient’s own stem cells,” says White. “The thesis was that the nanofabrication and bringing this level of control to the challenge of tissue engineering would result in some big advances.” The project also includes researchers from Florida International University, who helped with the mechanical measurements at the scaffolds, and those from Harvard Medical School who had expertise in heart disease and working with stem cells.


Match ID: 192 Score: 1.43 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 12 days
qualifiers: 1.43 development

Apple Mail Now Blocks Email Tracking. Here’s What That Means
Sat, 07 May 2022 11:00:00 +0000
If you don’t like marketers (or anyone else) knowing when and where you read your email, Apple’s feature will help you reclaim some privacy.
Match ID: 193 Score: 1.43 source: www.wired.com age: 14 days
qualifiers: 1.43 apple

Video Friday: No Time to Dance
Fri, 06 May 2022 16:00:01 +0000


Video Friday is your weekly selection of awesome robotics videos, collected by your friends at IEEE Spectrum robotics. We also post a weekly calendar of upcoming robotics events for the next few months. Please send us your events for inclusion.

ICRA 2022: 23–27 May 2022, PHILADELPHIA
IEEE ARSO 2022: 28–30 May 2022, LONG BEACH, CALIF.
RSS 2022: 27 June–1 July 2022, NEW YORK CITY
ERF 2022: 28–30 June 2022, ROTTERDAM, NETHERLANDS
RoboCup 2022: 11–17 July 2022, BANGKOK
IEEE CASE 2022: 20–24 August 2022, MEXICO CITY
CLAWAR 2022: 12–14 September 2022, AZORES, PORTUGAL

Enjoy today’s videos!


What a strange position for Boston Dynamics to be in, having to contend with the fact that its robots are at this point likely best known for dancing rather than for being useful in a more productivity-minded way:

Boston Dynamics is also announcing some upgrades for Spot:

[ Boston Dynamics ]

MIT CSAIL has developed a new way to rapidly design and fabricate soft pneumatic actuators with integrated sensing. Such actuators can be used as the backbone in a variety of applications such as assistive wearables, robotics, and rehabilitative technologies.

[ MIT ]

The Sechseläuten (“the six o’clock ringing of the bells”) is a traditional spring holiday in the Swiss city of Zurich, and this year, it had a slightly less traditional guest: ANYmal!

[ Swiss-Mile ]

Thanks, Marko!

Working in collaboration with domestic appliances manufacturer Beko, researchers from the University of Cambridge trained their robot chef to assess the saltiness of a dish at different stages of the chewing process, imitating a similar process in humans. Their results could be useful in the development of automated or semi-automated food preparation by helping robots to learn what tastes good and what doesn’t, making them better cooks.

[ Cambridge ]

More impressive work from the UZH Robotics and Perception Group, teaching racing quadrotors to adapt on the fly to a changing course:

[ RPG ]

In the SANDRo Project, funded by DIH-HERO, PAL Robotics and Heemskerk Innovation Technology are developing the TIAGo robot to provide assistive services to people with difficulties in the activities of daily living.

[ PAL Robotics ]

For drones to autonomously perform necessary but quotidian tasks, such as delivering packages or airlifting injured drivers from a traffic accident, drones must be able to adapt to wind conditions in real time—rolling with the punches, meteorologically speaking. To face this challenge, a team of engineers from Caltech has developed Neural-Fly, a deep-learning method that can help drones cope with new and unknown wind conditions in real time just by updating a few key parameters.

[ Caltech ]

On May 17th, the Furhat Conference on Social Robotics returns with a new lineup of experts who will share their latest cutting edge research and innovation projects using social robots and conversational AI. Since Furhat Robotics’ recent acquisition of Misty Robotics, a brand new face will make an appearance—the Misty robot! Registration for the conference is free and now open.

[ Furhat Conference ]

Thanks, Chris!

This is quite a contest: Draw your best idea for a robot inspired by nature, and if you win, a bunch of robotics experts will actually build it!

[ Natural Robotics Contest ]

Thanks, Robert!

Thailand is equipping vocational students with robotic skills to cater to the anticipated demand for 200,000 robotics-trained workers by 2024. More and more factories are moving to Thailand, hence education plays an important role to educate the students in Industry 4.0 knowledge.

[ Kuka ]

Dusty Robotics develops robot-powered tools for the modern construction workforce, using cutting-edge robotics technology that is built in-house from the ground up. Our engineers design the mechanical, electrical, firmware, robotics, and software components that power ultra-precise mobile printers. Hear from Dusty engineers about what it’s like to work at Dusty and the impact their work has—every day.

[ Dusty ]

One in three older adults falls every year, leading to a serious healthcare problem in the United States. A team of Stanford scholars are developing wearable robotics to help people restore their balance to prevent these falls. Karen Lu, associate professor of computer science, and Steve Collins, associate professor of mechanical engineering, explain how an intelligent exoskeleton could enhance people’s mobility.

[ Stanford HAI ]

The latest episode of the Robot Brains Podcast features Skydio CEO Adam Bry.

[ Robot Brains ]

This week’s CMU RI Seminar is by Ross L. Hatton from Oregon State, on “Snakes & Spiders, Robots & Geometry.”

[ CMU RI ]


Match ID: 194 Score: 1.43 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 15 days
qualifiers: 1.43 development

Take the Lead on Satellite Design Using Digital Engineering
Tue, 03 May 2022 18:22:00 +0000


Win the race to design and deploy satellite technologies and systems. Learn how new digital engineering techniques can accelerate development and reduce your risk and costs. Download this free whitepaper now!

Our white paper covers:

  • Software-based digital twin models to reduce costly satellite system re-design
  • Ways to improve models throughout the product lifecycle, increase confidence, and reduce risks

Match ID: 195 Score: 1.43 source: connectlp.keysight.com age: 18 days
qualifiers: 1.43 development

Concrete Hardening | Cosmic Kiss 360°
Tue, 03 May 2022 11:03:00 +0200
Video: 00:02:47

Take a look inside the box and join ESA astronaut Matthias Maurer from a very special perspective as he supports the @DLR Mason/Concrete Hardening experiment.

The Concrete Hardening experiment investigates the behaviour of various concrete mixtures containing cement and sand or simulated ‘Moon dust’ combined with water and various admixtures. On Earth, higher density components tend to move downward but in weightlessness they are likely to be more evenly distributed.

Researchers will analyse the concrete mixed by Matthias in space for strength, bubble and pore distribution as well as crystal structures, comparing this to ground samples. Their findings will facilitate the development of new, improved concrete mixes that could be used to construct habitats on the Moon or Mars and build more sustainable housing on Earth.

Follow Matthias.

Access the other Cosmic Kiss 360º videos.


Match ID: 196 Score: 1.43 source: www.esa.int age: 18 days
qualifiers: 1.43 development

NASA Awards Contracts for Aerospace Testing and Facilities Operations
Mon, 11 Apr 2022 17:44 EDT
NASA has awarded a contract to Jacobs Technology Inc. of Tullahoma, Tennessee, to provide the agency’s Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, California with support services for ground-based aerospace test facilities at the center.
Match ID: 197 Score: 1.43 source: www.nasa.gov age: 40 days
qualifiers: 1.43 california

Meet the Lunar Gateway’s Robot Caretakers
Thu, 07 Apr 2022 18:40:09 +0000


An integral part of NASA’s plan to return astronauts to the moon this decade is the Lunar Gateway, a space station that will be humanity’s first permanent outpost outside of low Earth orbit. Gateway, a partnership between NASA, the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), is intended to support operations on the lunar surface while also serving as a staging point for exploration to Mars.

Gateway will be significantly smaller than the International Space Station (ISS), initially consisting of just two modules with additional modules to be added over time. The first pieces of the station to reach lunar orbit will be the Power and Propulsion Element (PPE) attached to the Habitation and Logistics Outpost (HALO), scheduled to launch together on a SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket in November 2024. The relatively small size of Gateway is possible because the station won’t be crewed most of the time—astronauts may pass through for a few weeks, but the expectation is that Gateway will spend about 11 months out of the year without anyone on board.


This presents some unique challenges for Gateway. On the ISS, astronauts spend a substantial amount of time on station upkeep, but Gateway will have to keep itself functional for extended periods without any direct human assistance.

“The things that the crew does on the International Space Station will need to be handled by Gateway on its own,” explains Julia Badger, Gateway autonomy system manager at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. “There’s also a big difference in the operational paradigm. Right now, ISS has a mission control that’s full time. With Gateway, we’re eventually expecting to have just 8 hours a week of ground operations.” The hundreds of commands that the ISS receives every day to keep it running will still be necessary on Gateway—they’ll just have to come from Gateway itself, rather than from humans back on Earth.

“It’s a new way of thinking compared to ISS. If something breaks on Gateway, we either have to be able to live with it for a certain amount of time, or we’ve got to have the ability to remotely or autonomously fix it.” —Julia Badger, NASA JSC

To make this happen, NASA is developing a vehicle system manager, or VSM, that will act like the omnipresent computer system found on virtually every science-fiction starship. The VSM will autonomously manage all of Gateway’s functionality, taking care of any problems that come up, to the extent that they can be managed with clever software and occasional input from a distant human. “It’s a new way of thinking compared to ISS,” explains Badger. “If something breaks on Gateway, we either have to be able to live with it for a certain amount of time, or we’ve got to have the ability to remotely or autonomously fix it.”

While Gateway itself can be thought of as a robot of sorts, there’s a limited amount that can be reasonably and efficiently done through dedicated automated systems, and NASA had to find a compromise between redundancy and both complexity and mass. For example, there was some discussion about whether Gateway’s hatches should open and close on their own, and NASA ultimately decided to leave the hatches manually operated. But that doesn’t necessarily mean that Gateway won’t be able to open its hatches without human assistance; it just means that there will be a need for robotic hands rather than human ones.

“I hope eventually we have robots up there that can open the hatches,” Badger tells us. She explains that Gateway is being designed with potential intravehicular robots (IVRs) in mind, including things like adding visual markers to important locations, placing convenient charging ports around the station interior, and designing the hatches such that the force required to open them is compatible with the capabilities of robotic limbs. Parts of Gateway’s systems may be modular as well, able to be removed and replaced by robots if necessary. “What we’re trying to do,” Badger says, “is make smart choices about Gateway’s design that don’t add a lot of mass but that will make it easier for a robot to work within the station.”

A human-sized white humanoid robot with a golden helmet and visor, in front of a task board on the International Space Station Robonaut at its test station in front of a manipulation task board on the ISS.JSC/NASA

NASA already has a substantial amount of experience with IVR. Robonaut 2, a full-size humanoid robot, spent several years on the International Space Station starting in 2011, learning how to perform tasks that would otherwise have to be done by human astronauts. More recently, a trio of cubical, toaster-size, free-flying robots called Astrobees have taken up residence on the ISS, where they’ve been experimenting with autonomous sensing and navigation. A NASA project called ISAAC (Integrated System for Autonomous and Adaptive Caretaking) is currently exploring how robots like Astrobee could be used for a variety of tasks on Gateway, from monitoring station health to autonomously transferring cargo, although at least in the near term, in Badger’s opinion, “maintenance of Gateway, like using robots that can switch out broken components, is going to be more important than logistics types of tasks.”

Badger believes that a combination of a generalized mobile manipulator like Robonaut 2 and a free flyer like Astrobee make for a good team, and this combination is currently the general concept for Gateway IVR. This is not to say that the intravehicular robots that end up on Gateway will look like the robots that have been working on the ISS, but they’ll be inspired by them, and will leverage all of the experience that NASA has gained with its robots on ISS so far. It might also be useful to have a limited number of specialized robots, Badger says. “For example, if there was a reason to get behind a rack, you may want a snake-type of robot for that.”

A casually dressed astronaut holds a toaster-sized cubical robot on the International Space Station An Astrobee robot (this one is named Bumble) on the ISS.JSC/NASA

While NASA is actively preparing for intravehicular robots on Gateway, such robots do not yet exist, and the agency may not be building these robots itself, instead relying on industry partners to deliver designs that meet NASA’s requirements. At launch, and likely for the first several years at least, Gateway will have to take care of itself without internal robotic assistants. However, one of the goals of Gateway is to operate itself completely autonomously for up to three weeks without any contact with Earth at all, mimicking the three-week solar conjunction between Earth and Mars where the sun blocks any communications between the two planets. “I think that we will get IVR on board,” Badger says. “If we really want Gateway to be able to take care of itself for 21 days, IVR is going to be a very important part of that. And having a robot is absolutely something that I think is going to be necessary as we move on to Mars.”

“Having a robot is absolutely something that I think is going to be necessary as we move on to Mars.” —Julia Badger, NASA JSC

Intravehicular robots are just half of the robotic team that will be necessary to keep Gateway running autonomously long-term. Space stations rely on complex external infrastructure for power, propulsion, thermal control, and much more. Since 2001, the ISS has been home to Canadarm2, a 17.6-meter robotic arm, which is able to move around the station to grasp and manipulate objects while under human control from either inside the station or from the ground.

The Canadian Space Agency, in partnership with space technology company MDA, is developing a new robotic-arm system for Gateway, called Canadarm3, scheduled to launch in 2027. Canadarm3 will include an 8.5-meter-long arm for grappling spacecraft and moving large objects, as well as a smaller, more dexterous robotic arm that can be used for delicate tasks. The smaller arm can even repair the larger arm if necessary. But what really sets Canadarm3 apart from its predecessors is how it’s controlled, according to Daniel Rey, Gateway chief engineer and systems manager at CSA. “One of the very novel things about Canadarm3 is its ability to operate autonomously, without any crew required,” Rey says. This capability relies on a new generation of software and hardware that gives the arm a sense of touch as well as the ability to react to its environment without direct human supervision.

“With Canadarm3, we realize that if we want to get ready for Mars, more autonomy will be required.” —Daniel Rey, CSA

Even though Gateway will be a thousand times farther away from Earth than the ISS, Rey explains that the added distance (about 400,000 kilometers) isn’t what really necessitates Canadarm3’s added autonomy. “Surprisingly, the location of Gateway in its orbit around the moon has a time delay to Earth that is not all that different from the time delay in low Earth orbit when you factor in various ground stations that signals have to pass through,” says Rey. “With Canadarm3, we realize that if we want to get ready for Mars, where that will no longer be the case, more autonomy will be required.”

Canadarm3’s autonomous tasks on Gateway will include external inspection, unloading logistics vehicles, deploying science payloads, and repairing Gateway by swapping damaged components with spares. Rey tells us that there will also be a science logistics airlock, with a moving table that can be used to pass equipment in and out of Gateway. “It’ll be possible to deploy external science, or to bring external systems inside for repair, and for future internal robotic systems to cooperate with Canadarm3. I think that’ll be a really exciting thing to see.”

Even though it’s going to take a couple of extra years for Gateway’s robotic residents to arrive, the station will be operating mostly autonomously (by necessity) as soon as the Power and Propulsion Element and the Habitation and Logistics Outpost begin their journey to lunar orbit in November o2024. Several science payloads will be along for the ride, including heliophysics and space weather experiments.

Gateway itself, though, is arguably the most important experiment of all. Its autonomous systems, whether embodied in internal and external robots or not, will be undergoing continual testing, and Gateway will need to prove itself before we’re ready to trust its technology to take us into deep space. In addition to being able to operate for 21 days without communications, one of Gateway’s eventual requirements is to be able to function for up to three years without any crew visits. This is the level of autonomy and reliability that we’ll need to be prepared for our exploration of Mars, and beyond.


Match ID: 198 Score: 1.43 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 44 days
qualifiers: 1.43 development

Top Tech 2022: A Special Report
Mon, 03 Jan 2022 17:45:10 +0000


At the start of each year, IEEE Spectrum attempts to predict the future. It can be tricky, but we do our best, filling the January issue with a couple of dozen reports, short and long, about developments the editors expect to make news in the coming year.

This isn’t hard to do when the project has been in the works for a long time and is progressing on schedule—the coming first flight of NASA’s Space Launch System, for example. For other stories, we must go farther out on a limb. A case in point: the description of a hardware wallet for Bitcoin that the company formerly known as Square (which recently changed its name to Block) is developing but won’t officially comment on. One thing we can predict with confidence, though, is that Spectrum readers, familiar with the vicissitudes of technical development work, will understand if some of these projects don’t, in fact, pan out. That’s still okay.

Engineering, like life, is as much about the journey as the destination.

See all stories from our Top Tech 2022 Special Report



Match ID: 199 Score: 1.43 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 138 days
qualifiers: 1.43 development

Psyche: NASA Mission to a Metal World
Mon, 27 Dec 2021 16:00:00 +0000


When our solar system was very young, there were no planets—only a diffuse disk of gas and dust circled the sun. But within a few million years, that churning cloud of primordial material collapsed under its own gravity to form hundreds, or maybe thousands, of infant planets. Some of those planetesimals, as astronomers call them, grew to be hundreds of kilometers across as they swept up more dust and gas within the swirling solar nebula.

Once they had attained such a size, heat from the decay of the radioactive elements within them became trapped, raising temperatures enough to melt their insides. The denser components of that melt—iron and other metals—settled to the center, leaving lighter silicates to float up toward the surface. These lighter materials eventually cooled to form mantles of silicate rock around heavy metallic cores. In this way, vast amounts of iron and nickel alloys were trapped deep inside these planetesimals, forever hidden from direct scrutiny.

Or were they?


At this time, the solar system was still relatively crowded despite its vast size. And over the next 20 million or so years, many planetesimals crossed paths and collided. Some merged and grew into even larger protoplanets, eventually forming what became the familiar planets we know today.

In each of those protoplanet collisions, the metallic cores were battered and remixed with silicate mantle material, later separating again after being melted by the heat of accretion. Some collisions had enough energy to completely obliterate a protoplanet, leaving behind debris that contributed to the asteroid belt that now exists between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.

But a few protoplanets may have escaped either of these fates. Astronomers hypothesize that a series of “hit and run” impacts caused these bodies to lose most of their mantles, leaving behind only a small quantity of silicate rock and a large amount of metal. These materials combined to form a rare kind of world. If this theory is correct, the largest example would be an asteroid called 16 Psyche—named after the Greek goddess of the soul, Psyche, and because it was the 16th member of the asteroid belt to be discovered (in 1852).

This artist\u2019s rendering shows a highly cratered celestial object that is not quite spherical. This artist’s rendering suggests the kind of surface the asteroid 16 Psyche might have.Peter Rubin/JPL-Caltech/Arizona State University/NASA

16 Psyche is about as wide as Massachusetts and has metal-like density. This makes it large and dense enough to account for a full 1 percent of the total mass of the asteroid belt. Metal miners of the future may one day stake claims on it.

Psyche is also the name of a NASA mission to visit that asteroid. Led by Lindy Elkins-Tanton of Arizona State University and managed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Psyche mission will test astronomers’ theories about planetary-core formation and composition while it explores a world with a landscape unlike any that space probes have visited so far.

This photo shows a woman apparently giving a presentation. Lindy Elkins-Tanton of Arizona State University leads the Psyche mission’s scientific team.Bill Ingalls/NASA

The Psyche mission is scheduled to launch in August 2022, with the spacecraft reaching its destination more than three years later. What will it find there? Astronomers think we might see enormous surface faults from the contraction of freezing metal, glittering cliffs of green crystalline mantle minerals, frozen flows of sulfur lava, and vast fields of metal shards scattered over the surface from millennia of high-speed impacts. There will no doubt be plenty of surprises, too.

The long journey this space probe must make to reach its destination will be especially demanding. 16 Psyche resides in the outer part of the main asteroid belt, well beyond the orbit of Mars. The probe will begin circling the asteroid in January of 2026 and will study it for nearly two years.

Counterintuitively, arranging for a probe to orbit a small body like an asteroid is harder than orbiting a planet. Big planets have deep gravity wells, which allow spacecraft to enter orbit with a single low-altitude rocket burn. Small bodies have little gravity and provide essentially no gravitational leverage, so the spacecraft’s propulsion system must do all the work.

Astronomers think we might see enormous surface faults, glittering cliffs of green crystalline mantle minerals, frozen flows of sulfur lava, and vast fields of metal shards.

Not long ago, NASA managed this maneuver successfully with its Dawn mission, which sent a probe to orbit the asteroids Vesta and Ceres. The Dawn spacecraft used solar-electric propulsion. Its three highly efficient engines converted electricity from solar arrays into thrust by ionizing a propellant gas and accelerating it though a high-voltage electric field.

When our team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory was designing the Psyche probe, we planned to do something similar. The main problem was figuring out how to do it without exceeding the mission’s budget. JPL engineers solved this problem by using what was for the most part existing technology, manufactured by Maxar, a company based in Westminster, Colo. It is one of the world’s largest providers of commercial geosynchronous communication satellites, produced at a division located in Palo Alto, Calif.

The Psyche spacecraft is built on the “chassis” used for those satellites, which includes high-power solar arrays, electric-propulsion thrusters, and associated power and thermal control elements. In many ways, the Psyche spacecraft resembles a standard Maxar communications satellite. But it also hosts JPL’s avionics, flight software, and the many fault-protection systems required for autonomous deep-space operation.

 This photograph shows technicians outfitted in clean-room garb working on a large blocky spacecraft that is suspended from a gantry by cables. Technicians at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory work on the Psyche spacecraft.Maxar

Making this concept work was difficult from the get-go. First, NASA management was rightfully wary of such cost-cutting measures, because the “ faster, better, cheaper” model of missions mounted in the 1990s produced some spectacular failures. Second, using Earth-orbiting systems on the Dawn mission resulted in large cost overruns during the development phase. Finally, many people involved believed (erroneously) that the environment of deep space is very special and that the Psyche spacecraft would thus have to be very different from a communications satellite intended only to orbit Earth.

We and our many NASA colleagues addressed each of these issues by teaming with engineers at Maxar. We kept costs under control by using hardware from the company’s standard product line and by minimizing changes to it. We could do that because the thermal environment in geosynchronous orbit isn’t in fact so different from what the Psyche probe will encounter.

Soon after launch, the Psyche spacecraft will experience the same relatively high solar flux that communications satellites are built for. It will also have to handle the cold of deep space, of course, but Maxar’s satellites must endure similar conditions when they fly through Earth’s shadow, which they do once a day during certain times of the year.

Because they serve as high-power telecommunications relays, Maxar’s satellites must dissipate the many kilowatts of waste heat generated by their microwave power amplifiers. They do this by radiating that heat into space. Radiating lots of heat away would be a major problem for our space probe, though, because in the vicinity of 16 Psyche the flux of light and heat from the sun is one-tenth of that at Earth. So if nothing were done to prevent it, a spacecraft designed for orbiting Earth would soon become too cold to function this far out in the asteroid belt.

Maxar addressed this challenge by installing multilayer thermal blanketing all over the spacecraft, which will help to retain heat. The company also added custom louvers on top of the thermal radiators. These resemble Venetian blinds, closing automatically to trap heat inside when the spacecraft gets too cold. But plenty of other engineering challenges remained, especially with respect to propulsion.

To reduce the mass of propellant needed to reach the asteroid, the Psyche spacecraft will use solar-electric thrusters that accelerate ions to very high velocities—more than six times as high as what can be attained with chemical rockets. In particular, it will use a type of ion thruster known as a Hall thruster.

The photograph on the left shows a luminous ring with a diffuse glow around it. The photograph on the right shows the source of this light, a black cylindrical device bolted to the side of the spacecraft. A Hall thruster, four of which will propel the Psyche spacecraft, produces an eerie blue glow during testing [left]. The unit consists of a ring-shaped anode, which has a diameter similar to that of a dinner plate, and a narrow, cylindrical cathode mounted to one side [right].JPL-Caltech/NASA

Soviet engineers pioneered the use of Hall thrusters in space during the 1970s. And we use four Russian-made Hall thrusters on the Psyche spacecraft for the simple reason that Maxar uses that number to maintain the orbits of their communications satellites.

Hall thrusters employ a clever strategy to accelerate positively charged ions [see sidebar, “How a Hall Thruster Works”]. This is different from what is done in the ion thrusters on the Dawn spacecraft, which used high-voltage grids. Hall thrusters, in contrast, use a combination of electric and magnetic fields to accelerate the ions. While Hall thrusters have a long history of use on satellites, this is the first time they will go on an interplanetary mission.

How a Hall Thruster Works

A Hall thruster uses an electron discharge to create a plasma—a quasi-neutral collection of positive ions and electrons—not unlike what goes on in a fluorescent lamp.

The thruster includes a hollow cathode (negative electrode), placed outside the thruster body, and an anode (positive electrode) positioned inside a ring-shaped discharge chamber. If these electrodes were all there was, the power applied to the thruster would just go into making a current of electrons flowing from cathode to anode, emitting some blue glow along the way. Instead, a Hall thruster applies a radially directed magnetic field across its discharge channel.

The electrons emitted by the cathode are very light and fast. So this magnetic field impedes the flow of electrons to the anode, forcing them instead to go in circular orbits around the center line of the thruster. The positive xenon ions that are generated inside the discharge chamber accelerate toward the cloud of circling electrons, but these ions are too massive to be affected by the weak magnetic field. So they shoot straight out in a beam, sweeping up electrons along the way. The ejection of that material at high speed creates thrust. It’s not much thrust—equal to about the weight of a few quarters—but applied steadily for months on end, it’s enough to get the spacecraft zooming.

We kept costs under control by using hardware from Maxar's standard product line and by minimizing changes to it.

You might think that thrusting around Earth isn’t any different from doing so in deep space. There are, in fact, some big differences. Remember, the power to run the thrusters comes from solar panels, and that power must be used as it is generated—there is no great big battery to store it. So the power available to run the thrusters will diminish markedly as the spacecraft moves away from the sun.

That’s an issue because electric thrusters are usually designed to run best at their maximum power level. It turns out to be pretty easy to throttle them a little, maybe to about half their maximum output. For example, the Hall thrusters Maxar uses on its communications satellites can run at as much as 4.5 kilowatts when the satellite’s orbit needs to be raised. For more routine station keeping, these thrusters run at 3 kW. We needed these thrusters to run at less than 1 kW when the spacecraft neared its destination.

The problem is that efficiency decreases when you do this kind of throttling. In that sense, a Hall thruster is like the engine in your car. But the situation is worse than in a car: The electrical discharge inside a thruster can become unstable if the power is decreased too much. The throttled thruster can even quit firing altogether—like a flameout in a jet engine.

But with some clever engineering, we were able to make modifications to how we run Maxar’s thruster so that it could operate stably at power levels as low as 900 W. We then tested our reengineered thruster in facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center and at JPL to prove to ourselves that it would indeed operate reliably for the full six-year Psyche mission.

This CAD drawing shows the major components of the Deep Space Optical Communications system: a cylindrical optical transceiver assembly, a photon-counting camera attached to one side of that assembly, a \u201cfloating\u201d electronics package attached to the base of the unit, and three of the four isolation struts attaching the system to the spacecraft. The Psyche mission will test equipment for sending and receiving data optically. This Deep Space Optical Communications (DSOC) system must be pointed with great precision and kept isolated from vibration.JPL-Caltech/Arizona State University/NASA

The Psyche probe will venture more than three times as far from the sun as Earth ever does. Generating the 2 kW of power needed to operate the spacecraft and fire its thrusters when it reaches its destination requires an array of solar cells large enough to generate more than 20 kW near Earth. That’s a lot of power as these things go.

Fortunately for NASA, the cost of solar power has dropped dramatically over the past decade. Today, the commercial satellites that beam television and Internet signals across the globe generate these power levels routinely. Their solar-power systems are effective, reliable, and relatively inexpensive. But they are designed to work while circling Earth, not at the outer edges of the asteroid belt.

When the Psyche mission was conceived in 2013, Maxar had successfully flown more than 20 spacecraft with power levels greater than 20 kW. But the company had never built an interplanetary probe. JPL, on the other hand, had years of experience operating equipment in deep space, but it had never built a power system of the size required for the Psyche mission. So JPL and Maxar combined forces.

The challenge here was more complicated than just dealing with the fact that sunlight at 16 Psyche is so dim. The solar cells on the Psyche spacecraft would also have to operate at temperatures much lower than normal. That’s a serious issue because the voltage from such cells rises as they get colder.

When orbiting Earth, Maxar’s solar arrays generate 100 volts. If these same arrays were used near 16 Psyche, they would produce problematically high voltages. While we could have added electronics to reduce the voltage coming out of the array, the new circuitry would be costly to design, build, and test for space. Worse, it would have reduced the efficiency of power generation when the spacecraft is far from the sun, where producing adequate amounts of power will be tough in any case.

Fortunately, Maxar already had a solution. When one of their communications satellites passes into Earth’s shadow, it’s powered by a bank of lithium-ion batteries about the size of what’s found in electric cars. That’s big enough to keep the satellite running while it is in darkness behind Earth, which is never for much longer than an hour. But the voltage from such batteries varies over time—perhaps from as low as 40 V on some satellites when the battery is deeply discharged all the way up to 100 V. To handle that variability, Maxar’s satellites include “discharge converters,” which boost voltage to provide power at a constant 100 V. These converters were flight proven and highly efficient—ideal to repurpose for Psyche.

The key was to rewire the solar array, lowering the voltage it produced in the vicinity of Earth to about 60 V. As the spacecraft moves away from the sun, the voltage will gradually rise as the arrays get colder until it reaches about 100 V at 16 Psyche. Maxar’s discharge converters, normally attached to batteries, are connected to the solar array instead and used to provide the spacecraft with power at a constant 100 V over the entire mission.

This approach incurs some energy losses, but those are greatest when the spacecraft is close to Earth and power is abundantly available. The system will operate at its highest efficiency when the spacecraft nears 16 Psyche, where generating power will be a lot harder. It uses flight-proven hardware and is far more economical than sophisticated systems designed to eke out peak power from a solar array throughout a deep-space mission.

One day the technology being tested may enable you to watch astronauts tromping around the Red Planet in high-definition video.

In addition to the set of scientific instruments that will be used to study the asteroid, the Psyche spacecraft will also be carrying what NASA calls a “technology demonstration” payload. Like so many things at NASA, it goes by an acronym: DSOC, which stands for Deep Space Optical Communications.

DSOC is a laser-based communications system intended to outdo current radio technology by as much as a hundredfold. DSOC will demonstrate its capability by transmitting data at up to 2 megabits per second from beyond the orbit of Mars. One day similar technology may enable you to watch astronauts tromping around the Red Planet in high-definition video.

The DSOC instrument has a “ground segment” and a “flight segment,” each of which includes both a laser transmitter and a receiver. The transmitter for the ground segment, a 7-kW laser, will be installed at JPL’s Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory, located about 60 kilometers northeast of Los Angeles. A sensitive receiver, one capable of counting individual photons, will be attached to the 5.1-meter-wide Hale Telescope at Caltech’s Palomar Observatory, located a similar distance northeast of San Diego.

This photo shows a dish antenna that is covered by fabric being tested inside a chamber that is lined with material shaped to absorb electromagnetic radiation The Psyche spacecraft’s high-gain radio antenna, shown here being tested at the Maxar's facilities in Palo Alto, Calif., will provide the data communications throughout the mission.Maxar

DSOC’s flight segment, the part on the spacecraft, contains the same type of equipment, but much scaled down: a laser with an average power of 4 watts and a 22-centimeter telescope. The flight segment sounds simple, like something you could cobble together yourself at home. In fact, it’s anything but.

For one, it needs some rather elaborate gear to point it in the right direction. The Psyche spacecraft itself is able to keep DSOC pointed toward Earth to within a couple of milliradians—about a tenth of a degree. Using built-in actuators, DSOC then searches for the laser beacon sent from the ground. After detecting it, the actuators stabilize the pointing of DSOC’s own laser back at Earth with an accuracy measured in microradians.

The flight segment is able to point so steadily in the same direction because it’s housed in a special enclosure that provides thermal and mechanical isolation from the rest of the spacecraft. DSOC also uses a long sun shield to eliminate stray light on its laser receiver, with a deployable aperture cover to ensure that the unit remains clean.

During DSOC operations in space, the spacecraft cannot use its thrusters or gimbal its solar arrays, which would introduce problematic movements. Instead, it will keep its attitude fixed solidly in one direction and will use its star-tracking system to determine what that direction is. The constraints on what the spacecraft can do at these times is not an impediment, though, because DSOC will be used only for tests during the first year of the mission, while traveling to just past the orbit of Mars. When the spacecraft reaches 16 Psyche, it will transmit data back to Earth over a microwave radio link.

Having emerged from nearly a decade of planning, and having traveled for more than three years, the Psyche spacecraft will finally reach its target in early 2026. There will no doubt be plenty of tension in the air when controllers at JPL maneuver the spacecraft into orbit, waiting the many minutes it will take signals to be returned to find out whether all went well in this distant corner of the asteroid belt.

If all goes according to plan, for the following two years this communications-satellite-turned-space-probe will provide scientists with a close-up look at this odd metallic world, having already demonstrated an advanced optical system for high-data-rate communications. These achievements will have been a long time coming for us—but we expect that what is learned will be well worth the many years we’ve put into trying to ensure that this mission is a success.


Match ID: 200 Score: 1.43 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 145 days
qualifiers: 1.43 development

NASA’s 2021 Included Mars Landing, First Flight, Artemis, More
Tue, 21 Dec 2021 10:00 EST
In 2021, NASA completed its busiest year of development yet in low-Earth orbit, made history on Mars, continued to make progress on its Artemis plans for the Moon, tested new technologies for a supersonic aircraft, finalized launch preparations for the next-generation space telescope, and much more – all while safely operating during a pandemic and
Match ID: 201 Score: 1.43 source: www.nasa.gov age: 151 days
qualifiers: 1.43 development

NASA Awards SETI Institute Contract for Planetary Protection Support
Fri, 10 Jul 2020 12:04 EDT
NASA has awarded the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, a contract to support all phases of current and future planetary protection missions to ensure compliance with planetary protection standards.
Match ID: 202 Score: 1.43 source: www.nasa.gov age: 680 days
qualifiers: 1.43 california

On China, US National Security Experts Fear the Wrong Thing
Thu, 28 Apr 2022 13:00:00 +0000
Many argue that regulating Big Tech cedes leadership to China, but a healthy startup ecosystem is America's best defense.
Match ID: 203 Score: 0.71 source: www.wired.com age: 23 days
qualifiers: 0.71 startup

What Might War in Space Even Look Like?
Fri, 17 Dec 2021 14:00:01 +0000


A top military official says there’s a simmering shadow conflict playing out in space, with U.S. satellites coming under regular attack. But what does an attack on a spacecraft look like, who is committing them, and how can operators protect themselves?

General David Thompson, the vice chief of space operations at the US Space Force, recently told the Washington Post that China and Russia are targeting U.S. government satellites on a daily basis. While that might conjure up images of satellites being blown out of orbit left, right, and center, the reality is more low-key.

Thompson said the bulk of the incidents they’re seeing are “reversible attacks”, which temporarily disrupt a satellites operations rather than causing permanent damage. This can be achieved in a variety of ways, from jamming satellite signals to carrying out cyber-attacks.

“I would call those activities concerning, because there isn't a shared understanding of where the thresholds are for retaliation.”
—Laura Grego, MIT

These kinds of attacks exist in a legal and political gray area, says Laura Grego, a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow at the MIT Laboratory for Nuclear Security and Policy. But while most states don’t currently treat them as acts of war, the lack of clarity and their growing frequency is a worry.

“They’re testing the boundaries, trying to explore how far you can go before you get a reaction,” says Grego. “I would call those activities concerning, because there isn't a shared understanding of where the thresholds are for retaliation.”

The most common kind of attack involves interfering with the radio signals coming to and from satellites, particularly those used by GPS satellites, Brian Weeden, director of program planning at the Secure World Foundation, writes in an email. This can involve beaming a signal from a ground-based transmitter at a satellite to interfere with its ability to pick up communications from its control station. Alternatively, it’s possible to direct a rogue transmission towards ground receivers to block the signal, or replace it with a fake one, something known as spoofing.

A 2019 report from security research non-profit C4ADS found evidence that Russia regularly uses jamming and spoofing attacks against GPS satellites to protect sensitive locations from drone attacks or surveillance. But the US also has similar capabilities - last year the US Navy tested GPS jamming technology that interfered with signals across six states.

The US, Russia and China have also all developed ground-based laser systems designed to dazzle the optical sensors of spy satellites as they pass over sensitive sites. “That's akin to shining a really bright flashlight in someone's eyes,” writes Weeden. “It can temporarily prevent the satellite from taking a picture, or in some cases might actually physically damage the [image sensor] if it's strong enough. ”

The advent of software-defined radios has made it far easier and cheaper to carry out jamming and spoofing attacks on satellites.

The leading space powers still have the capability to commit more obvious acts of war in space. Russia recently drew widespread condemnation for testing an anti-satellite missile on one of its own defunct surveillance satellites, and the US, China, and India have all carried out similar tests. One disincentive to carrying out this kind of attack, however, is that it litters Earth’s orbit with debris that can unintentionally damage other spacecraft, says Grego.

There are ways to physically attack a satellite without causing so much collateral damage, though. So-called “co-orbital anti-satellite weapons” are essentially spacecraft that can maneuver close to an adversary's satellite before attacking them with a projectile or clawing at them with a robotic arm to cause damage. They can also be used to snoop on enemy satellites, says Grego, either to intercept signals or try to work out what their mission is.

In 2020, a pair of Russian spacecraft were spotted tailing a US spy satellite and a few months later one of them was seen releasing a fast moving projectile. So far though, there have been no reports of anyone carrying out a physical attack on another country’s satellite, says Grego.

Attacks on spacecraft are no longer just the preserve of nation states though, says Frank Schubert, from Airbus Cybersecurity. The advent of software defined radios, which use a digital processor rather than specialized electronics to modulate radio signals, has made it far easier and cheaper to carry out jamming and spoofing attacks. And in 2019, researchers showed that they could intercept signals from a satellite broadband service and identify users and their browsing activity using just €285 ($322) worth of equipment.

Satellite operators are also subject to constant attacks from hackers, says Schubert. Typically, these are targeted at the ground stations that control and communicate with satellites, but if successful could be used to do everything from steal data to interfere with the operation of spacecraft. There’s also a growing threat from “hybrid attacks”, says Schubert. For instance, attackers might jam a signal from a satellite and quickly follow this up with a well-crafted phishing email to the operator claiming to be able to resolve the problem.

Countering these threats involves following the same kinds of cybersecurity best practices as any other industry. But given the complex supply chains involved in building spacecraft it’s also critical to ensure the provenance of every part of the system. “Security by design is key,” says Schubert. “I can have the best defense for cyber-attacks, but if the bug is already inside my system that went in through the supply chain, I'm in big trouble.”

Another important way to counteract many of these threats is to build resiliency into space systems, says Grego. This could involve investing in the ability to rapidly launch replacement satellites or swapping a single large, expensive satellite with a network of smaller ones that can still operate if one or two are knocked out.


Match ID: 204 Score: 0.71 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 155 days
qualifiers: 0.71 uber

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Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos have an unhealthy Twitter habit | John Naughton
Sat, 21 May 2022 15:00:22 GMT

They are two of the world’s richest people, and both are obsessed with space travel, but they use social media for very different reasons

Why do billionaires tweet? Is it because they no longer have to earn a living? Or because they’re bored? Or because they spend a lot of time in, er, the smallest room in the mansion? Elon Musk, for example, currently the world’s richest fruitcake, has said that “At least 50% of my tweets were made on a porcelain throne”, adding that “it gives me solace”. This revelation motivated the astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson to do some calculations, leading to the conclusion that more than 8,000 tweets over 12.5 years suggests that, on average, Musk “poops” twice a day. (I make it 1.75 a day, but that’s just quibbling.)

So why does Musk tweet so much? One explanation is that he just can’t help himself. He has, after all, revealed that he has Asperger’s. “Look, I know I sometimes say or post strange things,” he said on Saturday Night Live, “but that’s just how my brain works”. Understood. It may also be a partial explanation of his business success, because his mastery of SpaceX and Tesla suggests not only high intelligence but also an ability to focus intensely on exceedingly complex problems without being distracted by other considerations.

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Match ID: 0 Score: 575.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 500.00 space travel, 75.00 space travel

Can the Artemis Moon Mission Revive the Glamour of Big Tech?
Tue, 17 May 2022 15:00:01 +0000


Today, the phrase “big tech” typically resonates negatively. It conjures up disturbing aspects of social media and the rise of megacorporations that seem beyond the reach of the law. And yet decades ago, big tech was typically associated with the glamor of motion: of speed, of power, and the thrill of exploring new frontiers.

Two leaders, Wernher von Braun and Juan Trippe, became household names as they made bold bets that paid off and enabled people to go where few thought it possible not long before. Von Braun had a troubling history: As a 30-year-old, he had convinced Adolf Hitler to fund his V-2 missiles, of which thousands were built, with slave labor. They rained down on Paris, London, and other cities, killing 9,000 people, mostly civilians.


But when von Braun’s Apollo program came to fruition, in the late 1960s, huge crowds gathered every few months on the Florida coast to watch the thundering Saturn V rockets take off. It was a partylike atmosphere and a joyous time. We humans were going to the moon, making a connection that had seemed both improbable and impossible just a few years before.

Pan Am’s landing in Manila marked the start of globalism, of our modern connectivity.

The rapturous crowds in Florida gathered during a turbulent time, with popular culture dominated by sex, drugs, rock and roll, and pervasive antiestablishment sentiment. And yet, in that unsettled era, techno-optimism somehow took root. The most religious experience I have ever had was during the astronauts’ live-to-Earth reading of Genesis from orbit around the moon on Christmas Eve, 1968.

Few probably realize that the big Apollo gatherings had a clear precedent in another mass outpouring of hope about large-scale human adventure. It occurred around San Francisco Bay at the height of the Great Depression, 30 years before the Apollo landings. Another indomitable spirit, Trippe, the president of Pan Am, was betting against all odds that he could open transpacific passenger service, and make it real on a timetable that no sober advisor believed possible.

This Martin M-130 flying boat, called the China Clipper, took off on a test flight from San Francisco Bay in October 1935—one month before it made the first commercial transpacific flight. FPG/Archive Photos/Getty Images

On 22 November 1935, the first transpacific commercial flight took to the skies. At 3:46 p.m., a Martin M-130 flying boat, the largest passenger plane built up to that point, lumbered into the air from Pan Am's base in Alameda, Calif., on the east side of San Francisco Bay. On that first trip, the plane carried only mail under contract to the U.S. post office.

Over 100,000 people had gathered around the bay to watch. Captain Edwin Musick powered the "China Clipper" northward in the bay and up over the waves. He planned to fly over the Bay Bridge, the double suspension bridge that today spans the bay and links San Francisco with Oakland. But he couldn't gain altitude quickly enough with the 4,000 gallons of fuel he was carrying. Fortunately, the roadway had not yet been hung from the catenaries, and he managed to fly under them. When he got to the Golden Gate Bridge, also under construction at the time, he just barely managed to get above it.

On the Clipper’s very first return flight from Honolulu to San Francisco, disaster was very narrowly averted when the big seaplane landed in the bay with just 1 minute of fuel left in its tanks.

When Musick and his crew arrived in the Philippines six days later, there were 200,000 people cheering wildly in Manila Harbor. Musick hand-delivered a letter from President Franklin D. Roosevelt to President Manuel Quezon of the Philippines. Quezon told Musick, "You have swept away forever the distance which from the beginning of time has separated the great continent of America from the beautiful islands of the Pacific." Pan Am’s landing in Manila marked the start of globalism, of our modern connectivity.

Today, as NASA’s Artemis mission heralds a new era of human space exploration, it’s important to remember how much difficulty and serendipity there was on the way to Manila and the moon. On the Clipper’s first return flight from Honolulu to San Francisco, disaster was very narrowly averted when the big seaplane landed in the bay with just 1 minute of fuel left in its tanks. Von Braun could have easily ended up dead or in Russia rather than in the United States.

Similarly, there will be many twists and turns on the way to the moon and Mars. The obvious successor to Trippe and von Braun would now seem to be Elon Musk—but maybe it’ll be someone else. Regardless, and despite our divisions and perhaps even future pandemics, people will undoubtedly come out in droves once again to witness the takeoffs and landings. At last, big tech will again be something to celebrate.

This article appears in the June 2022 print issue as “22 November 1935: The Day Globalism was Born.”


Match ID: 1 Score: 475.00 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 4 days
qualifiers: 357.14 space travel, 53.57 space travel, 46.43 nasa, 17.86 mit

To Catch a Falling Satellite
Mon, 14 Mar 2022 16:55:14 +0000


It is the fate of many a dead satellite to spend its last years tumbling out of control. A fuel line may burst, or solar wind may surge, or there may be drag from the outer reaches of the atmosphere—and unless a spacecraft has been designed in some way that keeps it naturally stable, chances are good that it will begin to turn end over end.

That’s a problem, because Earth orbit is getting more and more crowded. Engineers would like to corral old pieces of space junk, but they can’t safely reach them, especially if they’re unstable. The European Space Agency says there are about 30,000 “debris objects” now being tracked in Earth orbit—derelict satellites, spent rocket stages, pieces sent flying from collisions in space. There may also be 900,000 smaller bits of orbital debris—everything from loose bolts to flecks of paint to shards of insulation. They may be less than 10 centimeters long, but they can still destroy a healthy satellite if they hit at orbital speeds.

“With more satellites being launched, we might encounter more situations where we have a defunct satellite that’s occupying a valuable orbit,” says Richard Linares, an assistant professor of aeronautics and astronautics at MIT. He’s part of an American-German project, called TumbleDock/ROAM, researching ways to corral and stabilize tumbling satellites so they can be deorbited or, in some cases, perhaps even refueled or repaired.

Engineers have put up with orbital debris for decades, but Linares says the picture is changing. For one thing, satellite technology is becoming more and more affordable—just look at SpaceX, which has been launching 40 satellites a week so far this year. For another, he says, the economic benefits those satellites offer—high-speed internet, GPS, climate and crop monitoring and other applications—will be threatened if the risk of impacts keeps growing.

“I think in the next few years we’ll have the technology to do something about space debris,” says Linares. “And there are economic drivers that will incentivize companies to do this.”

The TumbleDock/ROAM team has just finished a series of tests in the cabin of the International Space Station, using NASA robots called Astrobees to stand in for a tumbling satellite and a “chaser” spacecraft sent to catch it. The goal: to figure out algorithms so that a chaser can find its target, determine its tumble rates, and calculate the safest and most efficient approach to it.

Astrobee robot experiment aboard the ISS to reach a tumbling target in space. www.youtube.com

“There’s a massive amount of large debris out there,” says Keenan Albee, a Ph.D. student on the team at MIT. “Look at some of them, with large solar panels that are ready to whack you if you don’t do the approach correctly.”

The researchers decided early on that a chase vehicle needs enough autonomy to close in on a disabled satellite on its own. Even the largest satellites are too distant for ground-based tracking stations to track their attitude with any precision. A chaser, perhaps equipped with navigation cameras, lidar, and other sensors, will need to do the job in real time.

“The tumbling motion of a satellite can be quite complex,” says Roberto Lampariello, the principal investigator on the project at the German Aerospace Center, or DLR. “And if you want to be sure you are not going to collide with any appendages while approaching the mating point, having an autonomous method of guidance is, I think, very attractive.”

The Astrobee tests on the space station showed that it can be done, at least in principle. Each Astrobee robot is a cube, about 30 centimeters on a side, with navigation cameras, compressed-air thrusters, and Snapdragon processors much like what you would find in a smartphone. For the latest test, last month, NASA astronaut Mark Vande Hei set up two Astrobees a couple of meters apart. They then took their commands from Albee on the ground. He started the test runs, with one robot tumbling and the other trying to rendezvous with it. There have been glitches; the Astrobees needed help determining their precise location relative to the station walls. But the results of the tests were promising.

A next step, say the researchers, is to determine how best for a chase spacecraft to grapple its target, which is especially difficult if it’s a piece of debris with no docking mechanism. Other plans over the years have involved big nets or lasers; TumbleDock/ROAM team members say they’re intrigued by grippers that use van der Waals forces between atoms, the kinds that help a gecko cling to a sheer surface.

The larger question is how to turn experiments like these into actual solutions to a growing, if lofty, problem. Low Earth orbit has been crowded enough, for long enough, that satellite makers add shielding to their vehicles and space agencies continuously scan the skies to prevent close calls. No space travelers have been killed, and there have only been a few cases in which satellites were actually pulverized. But the problem has become increasingly expensive and, in some cases, dangerous. SpaceX has launched 2,000 Starlink Internet satellites so far, may launch 30,000 more, and has other companies (like Amazon) racing to keep up. They see profits up there.

MIT’s Linares says that, in fact, is why it’s worth figuring out the space-junk problem. “There’s a reason why those orbits are valuable,” he says. Companies may spend billions to launch new satellites—and don’t want them threatened by old satellites.

“If your company’s benefiting from an orbit band,” he says, “then you’d probably better get someone to clean it up for you.”


Match ID: 2 Score: 95.00 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 68 days
qualifiers: 71.43 space travel, 10.71 space travel, 9.29 nasa, 3.57 mit

Practical Power Beaming Gets Real
Sat, 21 May 2022 15:00:01 +0000


Wires have a lot going for them when it comes to moving electric power around, but they have their drawbacks too. Who, after all, hasn’t tired of having to plug in and unplug their phone and other rechargeable gizmos? It’s a nuisance.

Wires also challenge electric utilities: These companies must take pains to boost the voltage they apply to their transmission cables to very high values to avoid dissipating most of the power along the way. And when it comes to powering public transportation, including electric trains and trams, wires need to be used in tandem with rolling or sliding contacts, which are troublesome to maintain, can spark, and in some settings will generate problematic contaminants.


Many people are hungry for solutions to these issues—witness the widespread adoption over the past decade of wireless charging, mostly for portable consumer electronics but also for vehicles. While a wireless charger saves you from having to connect and disconnect cables repeatedly, the distance over which energy can be delivered this way is quite short. Indeed, it’s hard to recharge or power a device when the air gap is just a few centimeters, much less a few meters. Is there really no practical way to send power over greater distances without wires?

To some, the whole notion of wireless power transmission evokes images of Nikola Tesla with high-voltage coils spewing miniature bolts of lightning. This wouldn’t be such a silly connection to make. Tesla had indeed pursued the idea of somehow using the ground and atmosphere as a conduit for long-distance power transmission, a plan that went nowhere. But his dream of sending electric power over great distances without wires has persisted.

To underscore how safe the system was, the host of the BBC science program “Bang Goes the Theory” stuck his face fully into a power beam.

Guglielmo Marconi, who was Tesla’s contemporary, figured out how to use “Hertzian waves,” or electromagnetic waves, as we call them today, to send signals over long distances. And that advance brought with it the possibility of using the same kind of waves to carry energy from one place to another. This is, after all, how all the energy stored in wood, coal, oil, and natural gas originally got here: It was transmitted 150 million kilometers through space as electromagnetic waves—sunlight—most of it millions of years ago.

Can the same basic physics be harnessed to replace wires today? My colleagues and I at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, in Washington, D.C., think so, and here are some of the reasons why.

There have been sporadic efforts over the past century to use electromagnetic waves as a means of wireless power transmission, but these attempts produced mixed results. Perhaps the golden year for research on wireless power transmission was 1975, when William Brown, who worked for Raytheon, and Richard Dickinson of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (now retired) used microwaves to beam power across a lab with greater than 50 percent end-to-end efficiency. In a separate demonstration, they were able to deliver more than 30 kilowatts over a distance of about a mile (1.6 kilometers).

These demonstrations were part of a larger NASA and U.S. Department of Energy campaign to explore the feasibility of solar-power satellites, which, it was proposed, would one day harvest sunlight in space and beam the energy down to Earth as microwaves. But because this line of research was motivated in large part by the energy crisis of the 1970s, interest in solar-power satellites waned in the following decades, at least in the United States.

Although researchers revisit the idea of solar-power satellites with some regularity, those performing actual demonstrations of power beaming have struggled to surpass the high-water mark for efficiency, distance, and power level reached in 1975. But that situation is starting to change, thanks to various recent advances in transmission and reception technologies.

In this image, a narrow purple beam shines across a darkened room. During a 2019 demonstration at the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Bethesda, Md., this laser beam safely conveyed 400 watts over a distance of 325 meters.U.S. Naval Research Laboratory

Most early efforts to beam power were confined to microwave frequencies, the same part of the electromagnetic spectrum that today teems with Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and various other wireless signals. That choice was, in part, driven by the simple fact that efficient microwave transmitting and receiving equipment was readily available.

But there have been improvements in efficiency and increased availability of devices that operate at much higher frequencies. Because of limitations imposed by the atmosphere on the effective transmission of energy within certain sections of the electromagnetic spectrum, researchers have focused on microwave, millimeter-wave, and optical frequencies. While microwave frequencies have a slight edge when it comes to efficiency, they require larger antennas. So, for many applications, millimeter-wave or optical links work better.

For systems that use microwaves and millimeter waves, the transmitters typically employ solid-state electronic amplifiers and phased-array, parabolic, or metamaterial antennas. The receiver for microwaves or millimeter waves uses an array of elements called rectennas. This word, a portmanteau of rectifier and antenna, reflects how each element converts the electromagnetic waves into direct-current electricity.

Any system designed for optical power transmission would likely use a laser—one with a tightly confined beam, such as a fiber laser. The receivers for optical power transmission are specialized photovoltaic cells designed to convert a single wavelength of light into electric power with very high efficiency. Indeed, efficiencies can exceed 70 percent, more than double that of a typical solar cell.

At the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, we have spent the better part of the past 15 years looking into different options for power beaming and investigating potential applications. These include extending the flight times and payload capacities of drones, powering satellites in orbit when they are in darkness, powering rovers operating in permanently shadowed regions of the moon, sending energy to Earth’s surface from space, and distributing energy to troops on the battlefield.

You might think that a device for sending large amounts of energy through the air in a narrow beam sounds like a death ray. This gets to the heart of a critical consideration: power density. Different power densities are technically possible, ranging from too low to be useful to high enough to be dangerous. But it’s also possible to find a happy medium between these two extremes. And there are also clever ways to permit beams with high power densities to be used safely. That’s exactly what a team I was part of did in 2019, and we’ve successfully extended this work since then.

One of our industry partners, PowerLight Technologies, formerly known as LaserMotive, has been developing laser-based power-beaming systems for more than a decade. Renowned for winning the NASA Power Beaming Challenge in 2009, this company has not only achieved success in powering robotic tether climbers, quadcopters, and fixed-wing drones, but it has also delved deeply into the challenges of safely beaming power with lasers. That’s key, because many research groups have demonstrated laser power beaming over the years—including teams at the Naval Research Laboratory, Kindai University, the Beijing Institute of Technology, the University of Colorado Boulder, JAXA, Airbus, and others—but only a few have accomplished it in a fashion that is truly safe under every plausible circumstance.

This diagram shows the peak power levels and distance achieved in 11 power-beaming demonstrations carried out between 1975 and 2021 There have been many demonstrations of power beaming over the years, using either microwaves [blue] or lasers [red], with the peak-power record having been set in 1975 [top]. In 2021, the author and his colleagues took second and third place for the peak-power level achieved in such experiments, having beamed more than a kilowatt over distances that exceeded a kilometer, using much smaller antennas. David Schneider

Perhaps the most dramatic demonstration of safe laser power beaming prior to our team’s effort was by the company Lighthouse Dev in 2012. To underscore how safe the system was, the host of the BBC science program “Bang Goes the Theory” stuck his face fully into a power beam sent between buildings at the University of Maryland. This particular demonstration took advantage of the fact that some infrared wavelengths are an order of magnitude safer for your eyes than other parts of the infrared spectrum.

That strategy works for relatively low-power systems. But as you push the level higher, you soon get to power densities that raise safety concerns regardless of the wavelength used. What then? Here’s where the system we’ve demonstrated sets itself apart. While sending more than 400 watts over a distance that exceeded 300 meters, the beam was contained within a virtual enclosure, one that could sense an object impinging on it and trigger the equipment to cut power to the main beam before any damage was done. Other testing has shown how transmission distances can exceed a kilometer.

Careful testing (for which no BBC science-program hosts were used) verified to our satisfaction the functionality of this feature, which also passed muster with the Navy’s Laser Safety Review Board. During the course of our demonstration, the system further proved itself when, on several occasions, birds flew toward the beam, shutting it off—but only momentarily. You see, the system monitors the volume the beam occupies, along with its immediate surroundings, allowing the power link to automatically reestablish itself when the path is once again clear. Think of it as a more sophisticated version of a garage-door safety sensor, where the interruption of a guard beam triggers the motor driving the door to shut off.

The 400 watts we were able to transmit was, admittedly, not a huge amount, but it was sufficient to brew us some coffee.

For our demonstrations, observers in attendance were able to walk around between the transmitter and receiver without needing to wear laser-safety eyewear or take any other precautions. That’s because, in addition to designing the system so that it can shut itself down automatically, we took care to consider the possible effects of reflections from the receiver or the scattering of light from particles suspended in the air along the path of the beam.

This set of three images shows a large white parabolic dish at the top, a gold-colored square in the middle, and a tall metal tower at the bottom. Last year, the author and his colleagues carried out a demonstration at the U.S. Army’s Blossom Point test facility south of Washington, D.C. They used 9.7-gigahertz microwaves to send 1,649 watts (peak power) from a transmitter outfitted with a 5.4-meter diameter parabolic dish [top] over a distance of 1,046 meters to a 2-by-2-meter “rectenna” [middle] mounted on a tower [bottom], which transformed the beam into usable electric power.U.S. Naval Research Laboratory

The 400 watts we were able to transmit was, admittedly, not a huge amount, but it was sufficient to brew us some coffee, continuing what’s become de rigueur in this line of experimentation: making a hot beverage. (The Japanese researchers who started this tradition in 2015 prepared themselves some tea.)

Our next goal is to apply power beaming, with fully integrated safety measures, to mobile platforms. For that, we expect to increase the distance covered and the amount of power delivered.

But we’re not alone: Other governments, established companies, and startups around the world are working to develop their own power-beaming systems. Japan has long been a leader in microwave and laser power beaming, and China has closed the gap if not pulled ahead, as has South Korea.

At the consumer-electronics level, there are many players: Powercast, Ossia, Energous, GuRu, and Wi-Charge among them. And the multinational technology giant Huawei expects power beaming for smartphone charging within “two or three [phone] generations.”

For industrial applications, companies like Reach Labs, TransferFi, MH GoPower, and MetaPower are making headway in employing power beaming to solve the thorny problem of keeping batteries for robots and sensors, in warehouses and elsewhere, topped off and ready to go. At the grid level, Emrod and others are attempting to scale power beaming to new heights.

On the R&D front, our team demonstrated within the past year safe microwave wireless power transmission of 1.6 kilowatts over a distance of a kilometer. Companies like II-VI Aerospace & Defense, Peraton Labs, Lighthouse Dev, and others have also recently made impressive strides. Today, ambitious startups like Solar Space Technologies, Solaren, Virtus Solis, and others operating in stealth mode are working hard to be the first to achieve practical power beaming from space to Earth.

As such companies establish proven track records for safety and make compelling arguments for the utility of their systems, we are likely to see whole new architectures emerge for sending power from place to place. Imagine drones that can fly for indefinite periods and electrical devices that never need to be plugged in—ever—and being able to provide people anywhere in the world with energy when hurricanes or other natural disasters ravage the local power grid. Reducing the need to transport fuel, batteries, or other forms of stored energy will have far-reaching consequences. It’s not the only option when you can’t string wires, but my colleagues and I expect, within the set of possible technologies for providing electricity to far-flung spots, that power beaming will, quite literally, shine.

This article appears in the June 2022 print issue as “Spooky Power at a Distance.”


Match ID: 3 Score: 90.00 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 0 days
qualifiers: 65.00 nasa, 25.00 mit

Video Friday: Drone in a Cage
Fri, 20 May 2022 20:39:41 +0000


Video Friday is your weekly selection of awesome robotics videos, collected by your friends at IEEE Spectrum robotics. We also post a weekly calendar of upcoming robotics events for the next few months. Please send us your events for inclusion.

ICRA 2022: 23 May–27 May 2022, PHILADELPHIA
IEEE ARSO 2022: 28 May–30 May 2022, LONG BEACH, CALIF.
RSS 2022: 21 June–1 July 2022, NEW YORK CITY
ERF 2022: 28 June–30 June 2022, ROTTERDAM, NETHERLANDS
RoboCup 2022: 11 July–17 July 2022, BANGKOK
IEEE CASE 2022: 20 August–24 August 2022, MEXICO CITY
CLAWAR 2022: 12 September–14 September 2022, AZORES, PORTUGAL

Enjoy today’s videos!


After four years of development, Flyability has announced the Elios 3, which you are more than welcome to smash into anything you like.

“The Elios 3 is the single biggest project that Flyability has ever undertaken,” said Adrien Briod, CTO of Flyability. “If you think of the Elios 2 as your classic flip phone, only designed to make phone calls, the Elios 3 is the smartphone. It’s made to be customized for the specific demands of each user, letting you attach the payload you need so you can use the tool as you like, and allowing it to grow and improve over time with new payloads or software solutions.”

[ Flyability ]

We get that Digit is good at walking under things, but if Agility wants to make the robot more relatable, it should program Digit to bump its head like 5 percent of the time. We all do it.

[ Agility ]

Skybrush is a drone-show management platform that’s now open source, and if drone shows aren’t your thing, it’s also good for coordinating multiple drones in any other way you want. Or you can make drone shows your thing!

We share Skybrush because we are proud of it, and because we envision a growing community around it, consisting of enthusiastic and motivated experts and users all around the world who can join our mission to create something great for the future. The drone industry is evolving at light speed, our team alone is too small yet to keep pace with it. But we have a core that is rock solid and we know for sure that great things can be built on top of it.

[ Skybrush ]

This happened back in the fall of 2021, but it’s still cool seeing the full video of a Gremlin launch, flight, and capture sequence.

[ Dynetics ]

NASA’s InSight lander touched down in the Elysium Planitia region of Mars in November of 2018. During its time on the Red Planet, InSight has achieved all its primary science goals and continues to hunt for quakes on Mars.

[ Insight ]

This kite-powered drone is blowing my mind.

[ Kite Propulsion ]

A friendly reminder that Tertill is anxious to massacre the weeds in your garden.

[ Tertill ]

I am not a fan of this ElliQ commercial.

[ ElliQ ]

We are excited to announce that the 2022 edition of the Swiss Drone Days will take place on 11–12 June in Dubendorf/Zurich. The event will feature live demos including autonomous drone racing...in one of the largest drone flying arenas in the world, spectacular drone races by the Swiss drone league, presentations of distinguished speakers, [and] an exhibition and trade fair.

[ Drone Days ]

Enjoy 8 minutes of fast-paced, extremely dramatic, absolutely mind-blowing robot football highlights.

[ RoboCup ]

This week’s GRASP on Robotics seminar is from Katherine Kuchenbecker at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, on haptics and physical human-robot interaction.

“A haptic interface is a mechatronic system that modulates the physical interaction between a human and their tangible surroundings. Such systems typically take the form of grounded kinesthetic devices, ungrounded wearable devices, or surface devices, and they enable the user to act on and feel a remote or virtual environment. I will elucidate key approaches to creating effective haptic interfaces by showcasing several systems my team created and evaluated over the years.”

[ UPenn ]

This Lockheed Martin Robotics Seminar is from Xuesu Xiao from The Everyday Robot Project at X, on Deployable Robots that Learn.

“While many robots are currently deployable in factories, warehouses, and homes, their autonomous deployment requires either the deployment environments to be highly controlled, or the deployment to only entail executing one single preprogrammed task. These deployable robots do not learn to address changes and to improve performance. For uncontrolled environments and for novel tasks, current robots must seek help from highly skilled robot operators for teleoperated (not autonomous) deployment. In this talk, I will present three approaches to removing these limitations by learning to enable autonomous deployment in the context of mobile robot navigation, a common core capability for deployable robots. Building on robust autonomous navigation, I will discuss my vision toward a hardened, reliable, and resilient robot fleet which is also task-efficient and continually learns from each other and from humans.”

[ UMD ]


Match ID: 4 Score: 90.00 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 1 day
qualifiers: 65.00 nasa, 25.00 mit

Peter Kalmus: ‘As a species, we’re on autopilot, not making the right decisions’
Sat, 21 May 2022 17:00:24 GMT

The Nasa data scientist explains why inaction on the climate crisis pushed him to chain himself to an LA bank – and why trusting in the ‘people in charge’ is so dangerous

Last month a Nasa data scientist, Peter Kalmus, chained himself to the entrance doors of the JP Morgan Chase building in Los Angeles. A video of a short speech he gave about global heating before he was arrested was shared multiple times on social media. In the clip, voice faltering, he told the public: “I’m here because scientists are not being listened to … we are going to lose everything and we are not joking.” He spoke to the Observer in a personal capacity.

What drove you to nonviolent protest?
It’s this mounting feeling that I need to do more. I have a sense of desperation, because of the wide gulf between what the science says society needs to do and how it feels like everything is heading in the opposite direction. World leaders and people not understanding that we’re in an emergency.

Continue reading...
Match ID: 5 Score: 65.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 65.00 nasa

Rocket Report: Starliner soars into orbit; about those Raptor RUDs in Texas
Fri, 20 May 2022 11:00:51 +0000
"From the outside, it might look like an ordinary rocket."
Match ID: 6 Score: 65.00 source: arstechnica.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 65.00 nasa

Starliner Launches to Space Station on Uncrewed Flight Test for NASA
Thu, 19 May 2022 18:48 EDT
Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner is in orbit, heading for the International Space Station following launch Thursday of the next-generation spacecraft on a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket on a mission designed to test the end-to-end capabilities of the crew-capable system as part of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program.
Match ID: 7 Score: 65.00 source: www.nasa.gov age: 2 days
qualifiers: 65.00 nasa

NASA, Partners to Host CAPSTONE Prelaunch Media Teleconference
Thu, 19 May 2022 14:04 EDT
NASA will host a media teleconference with partners Advanced Space and Rocket Lab at 3 p.m. EDT Wednesday, May 25, in advance of the Cislunar Autonomous Positioning System Technology Operations and Navigation Experiment (CAPSTONE) launch, scheduled for no earlier than Tuesday, May 31.
Match ID: 8 Score: 65.00 source: www.nasa.gov age: 2 days
qualifiers: 65.00 nasa

ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/19/2022
Thu, 19 May 2022 16:00:01 +0000
Payloads: ANITA-2: Air samples were manually taken from assigned ISS locations and entered into ANITA-2 for chemical analysis. The Analyzing Interferometer for Ambient Air-2 (ANITA-2) is a compact gas analyzer which can analyze and quantify 33 trace contaminants in the atmosphere aboard the ISS automatically. ANITA-2 can also detect the presence of unknown substances which …
Match ID: 9 Score: 65.00 source: blogs.nasa.gov age: 2 days
qualifiers: 65.00 nasa

NASA, Partners Offer Global View of Environmental Changes
Thu, 19 May 2022 09:36 EDT
Continuing the collaboration that produced the COVID-19 Earth Observing Dashboard in 2020, NASA and its international partners in Europe and Japan have combined the collective scientific power of their Earth-observing satellite data in expanding the online resource to document a broad array of planet-wide changes in the environment and human societ
Match ID: 10 Score: 65.00 source: www.nasa.gov age: 2 days
qualifiers: 65.00 nasa

Boeing Is Ready to Launch Starliner, a Rival to SpaceX’s Dragon
Thu, 19 May 2022 11:00:00 +0000
The company’s uncrewed spacecraft will fly to the International Space Station, and if successful, will give NASA astronauts another way to get to orbit.
Match ID: 11 Score: 65.00 source: www.wired.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 65.00 nasa

ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/18/2022
Wed, 18 May 2022 16:00:42 +0000
Payloads: Acoustic Diagnostics: Acoustic Diagnostics Instrument hardware was deinstalled and stowed. The Acoustic Upgraded Diagnostics In-Orbit (Acoustic Diagnostics) investigation tests the hearing of ISS crew members before, during, and after flight. This study assesses the possible adverse effects of noise and the microgravity environment aboard the ISS on human hearing. The investigation compares the relationship …
Match ID: 12 Score: 55.71 source: blogs.nasa.gov age: 3 days
qualifiers: 55.71 nasa

NASA’s InSight Mars Lander’s Days Are Numbered
Tue, 17 May 2022 19:34:43 +0000
After the InSight lander studied the strongest marsquake ever detected, scientists gave the space robot a negative prognosis because of its dwindling solar power.
Match ID: 13 Score: 46.43 source: www.wired.com age: 4 days
qualifiers: 46.43 nasa

NASA Awards Contract for Cybersecurity, Privacy Enterprise Solutions
Tue, 17 May 2022 15:27 EDT
NASA has awarded the Cybersecurity and Privacy Enterprise Solutions and Services (CyPrESS) contract to Booz Allen Hamilton of McLean, Virginia.
Match ID: 14 Score: 46.43 source: www.nasa.gov age: 4 days
qualifiers: 46.43 nasa

NASA Seeks Input on Moon to Mars Objectives, Comments Due May 31
Tue, 17 May 2022 13:00 EDT
NASA Seeks Input on Moon to Mars Objectives, Comments Due May 31
Match ID: 15 Score: 46.43 source: www.nasa.gov age: 4 days
qualifiers: 46.43 nasa

ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/17/2022
Tue, 17 May 2022 16:00:02 +0000
Crew-Observed Noise: This afternoon, the crew reported hearing a sound in the IDA Forward PMA2 area. The sound was compared to previous sounds reported in AR 9920, which is related to thermal gradients caused by high Beta periods and the Dragon Nose Cone shadowing on PMA2. The crew reviewed the recording from previous instances and …
Match ID: 16 Score: 46.43 source: blogs.nasa.gov age: 4 days
qualifiers: 46.43 nasa

ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/16/2022
Mon, 16 May 2022 16:00:40 +0000
ISS Reboost: On Saturday, the ISS performed a reboost using the aft Progress 79P R&D thrusters. The purpose of the reboost was to set up phasing conditions for the 81P 2-orbit rendezvous on June 3 (GMT 154). The burn duration was 11 minutes 25 seconds with a Delta-V of 1.1 m/s.  Waste and Hygiene Compartment …
Match ID: 17 Score: 37.14 source: blogs.nasa.gov age: 5 days
qualifiers: 37.14 nasa

Liz Truss rejects plea from Biden ally not to rewrite the Northern Ireland protocol
Sun, 22 May 2022 05:00:39 GMT

Foreign secretary tells Richard Neal, chair of the US Congress ways and means committee, that she cannot let the Brexit impasse drag on

Liz Truss is resisting pressure from a close ally of Joe Biden not to rewrite the Brexit deal’s Northern Ireland protocol, saying she will not let the impasse “drag on”.

The foreign secretary is facing concerted pressure from senior US politicians on the issue. Nancy Pelosi, the speaker of the House of Representatives, has already warned that she could endanger any hopes of a free trade deal with America.

Continue reading...
Match ID: 18 Score: 25.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Apple display supplier could lose out on large iPhone 14 order after it was reportedly caught cutting corners
2022-05-22T04:42:01+00:00
Apple display supplier could lose out on large iPhone 14 order after it was reportedly caught cutting corners submitted by /u/Sorin61
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Match ID: 19 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

A year after report, task force urges U.S. to keep ransomware on front burner
2022-05-22T04:07:48+00:00
A year after report, task force urges U.S. to keep ransomware on front burner submitted by /u/techietraveller84
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Match ID: 20 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Data Breach on DEA Law Enforcement System Grants Cyber Criminals Access to 16 Databases
2022-05-22T01:58:07+00:00
Data Breach on DEA Law Enforcement System Grants Cyber Criminals Access to 16 Databases submitted by /u/kry_some_more
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Match ID: 21 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Is social media training us to please a machine?
2022-05-22T01:55:11+00:00
Is social media training us to please a machine? submitted by /u/gadgetygirl
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Match ID: 22 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Company Wants to Protect All of Human Knowledge in Servers Under the Moons Surface
2022-05-22T01:53:21+00:00
Company Wants to Protect All of Human Knowledge in Servers Under the Moons Surface submitted by /u/kry_some_more
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Match ID: 23 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Russia-Ukraine war: what we know on day 88 of the invasion
Sun, 22 May 2022 01:37:16 GMT

Moscow considers prisoner swap for Putin ally; Russia bans 963 Americans including president Biden from entering the country

Ukraine has suggested it is willing to resume talks with Russia as Moscow claimed to have taken full control of the besieged city of Mariupol. Speaking to a television channel on Saturday, Ukraine’s president Volodymyr Zelenskiy said that “discussions between Ukraine and Russia will undoubtedly take place”. “Under what format I don’t know … but the war will be bloody, there will be fighting and [it] will only definitively end through diplomacy.” The Kremlin’s spokesperson, Dmitry Peskov, responded by blaming Ukraine for stopping the talks. The last discussions between the two sides took place on 22 April, according to Russian news agencies.

Russia is considering giving up Ukraine fighters captured in Mariupol for Viktor Medvedchuk, a detained ally of Russian president Vladimir Putin. “We are going to study the possibility,” said Leonid Slutsky, a senior member of Russia’s negotiating team on Ukraine, speaking from the separatist city of Donetsk in south-eastern Ukraine, the RIA Novosti news agency reported.

Russia banned 963 Americans, including president Joe Biden, from entering the country. The list also includes the secretary of state, Antony Blinken, and the CIA chief, William Burns.

Biden signed a funding bill that will provide nearly $40bn (£32bn) in aid to Ukraine.

Zelenskiy met Portugal’s prime minister, António Costa, and described the meeting as “important and meaningful”. Portugal later announced an agreement to provide €250m ($264m) in financial aid to Ukraine.

The Ukraine president also had a phone conversation with Italy’s prime minister, Mario Draghi, and says he stressed the importance of more sanctions on Russia and unblocking Ukrainian ports.

Russia destroyed a Ukrainian special-operations base near Odesa, Ukraine’s main Black Sea port, as well as a significant cache of western-supplied weapons in northern Zhytomyr region, Russia defence ministry spokesperson Igor Konashenkov said on Saturday. There was no confirmation from the Ukrainian side.

Ukraine ruled out a ceasefire or concessions to Moscow. Zelenskiy adviser Mykhailo Podolyak said Kyiv would not accept any deal with Russia that involved ceding territory. He said making concessions would backfire on Ukraine because Russia would hit back harder after any break in fighting. “The war will not stop [after concessions]. It will just be put on pause for some time,” Podolyak, Ukraine’s lead negotiator, told Reuters on Saturday. “They’ll start a new offensive, even more bloody and large-scale.”

Turkish president Tayyip Erdogan, who has objected to Sweden and Finland joining Nato, held phone calls with the leaders of the two countries on Saturday and discussed his concerns about terrorist organisations. Turkey surprised its Nato allies last week by objecting to the two countries’ accession to the military alliance, but western leaders have expressed confidence that Ankara’s objections will not be a roadblock for the membership process.

Russia’s state gas company, Gazprom, halted gas exports to Finland, which refused Moscow’s demands to pay in roubles for Russian gas after western countries imposed sanctions over the invasion.

Canada has imposed sanctions on the Russian-born billionaire and newspaper proprietor Alexander Lebedev. The former KGB agent is the owner of UK newspapers the Evening Standard and the Independent.

Continue reading...
Match ID: 24 Score: 25.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

US PGA Championship: Matt Fitzpatrick in contention as Mito Pereira leads at Southern Hills
Sun, 22 May 2022 00:52:30 GMT
Mito Pereira emerges with a three-shot lead at the US PGA Championship as England's Matt Fitzpatrick plays his way into contention.
Match ID: 25 Score: 25.00 source: www.bbc.co.uk age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Biden signs $40 billion Ukraine aid bill
Sat, 21 May 2022 20:14:38 EDT
The aid package deepens the U.S. commitment to Ukraine amid signs of preparations for a longer conflict.
Match ID: 26 Score: 25.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Undersea internet cables can monitor seismic activity, predict earthquakes
2022-05-21T23:52:51+00:00
Undersea internet cables can monitor seismic activity, predict earthquakes submitted by /u/kry_some_more
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Match ID: 27 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Matt Fitzpatrick in frame going into final round of US PGA Championship
Sat, 21 May 2022 23:52:57 GMT
  • Sheffield golfer makes 67 to trail Mito Pereira by three shots
  • Chilean, the world No 100, is playing only his second major

An English golfer was on a roll in the early stages of the US PGA Championship. ‘Long Jim’ Barnes, who emigrated to the United States from Cornwall, won this event – then in match play form – in 1916 and 1919. It was not played during the two intervening years.

Staggeringly, in more than a century that has passed since there has been no flag of St George adjacent to a US PGA winner. History will therefore not be on Matt Fitzpatrick’s side on day four at Southern Hills but it dictates how significant a success for the Yorkshireman would be.

Continue reading...
Match ID: 28 Score: 25.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Electric vehicle prices rise at Tesla, Rivian, GM and other carmakers
2022-05-21T23:07:06+00:00
Electric vehicle prices rise at Tesla, Rivian, GM and other carmakers submitted by /u/Cascading_Neurons
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Match ID: 29 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Gap between inflation rates for richest and poorest households at its widest in 16 years
Sat, 21 May 2022 23:01:31 GMT

With the poorest disproportionately hit by the cost of living crisis, senior Tories are demanding emergency action from Treasury

The gap in the inflation rates experienced by the richest and poorest households in the UK is at its highest level for 16 years – another sign that the cost of living crisis is most severe for those least able to cope.

With Boris Johnson and chancellor Rishi Sunak now facing daily pleas from business figures and their own MPs to take emergency action to help relieve soaring costs, it emerged that the inflation rate for the poorest 10th of households is 1.5 percentage points higher than for the richest 10th. This is the largest gap recorded since 2006.

Continue reading...
Match ID: 30 Score: 25.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Tesla, Microsoft and Ubuntu bugs found during Pwn2Own hacking competition
2022-05-21T22:30:47+00:00
Tesla, Microsoft and Ubuntu bugs found during Pwn2Own hacking competition submitted by /u/geoxol
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Match ID: 31 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Ghostly Unseen “Mirror World” Might Be Cause of Cosmic Controversy With Hubble Constant
2022-05-21T22:30:17+00:00
Ghostly Unseen “Mirror World” Might Be Cause of Cosmic Controversy With Hubble Constant submitted by /u/upyoars
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Match ID: 32 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

The weekend’s best deals: Epic PC games sale, 1Password subscriptions, and more
Sat, 21 May 2022 21:17:43 +0000
Dealmaster also has discounts on Hulu memberships, AirPods, and LG OLED TVs.
Match ID: 33 Score: 25.00 source: arstechnica.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Only in N.Y.: Upper West Side’s Nadler vs. Upper East Side’s Maloney
Sat, 21 May 2022 16:35:26 EDT
A court-ordered redistricting map has created a cross-town battle that has never happened: One House committee chair, Jerrold Nadler of New York's Upper West Side, is set to face off against Manhattan's other House committee chair, Carolyn B. Maloney of the Upper East Side.
Match ID: 34 Score: 25.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Long-hypothesized 'next generation wonder material' created for first time
2022-05-21T20:04:55+00:00
Long-hypothesized 'next generation wonder material' created for first time submitted by /u/upyoars
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Match ID: 35 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Breach exposed data of half-million Chicago students, staff
2022-05-21T19:14:33+00:00
Breach exposed data of half-million Chicago students, staff submitted by /u/Sorin61
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Match ID: 36 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Where the billions spent on autonomous vehicles by U.S. and Chinese giants is heading
2022-05-21T18:42:47+00:00
Where the billions spent on autonomous vehicles by U.S. and Chinese giants is heading submitted by /u/Soupjoe5
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Match ID: 37 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Search reveals eight new sources of black hole echoes
2022-05-21T17:19:30+00:00
Search reveals eight new sources of black hole echoes submitted by /u/fchung
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Match ID: 38 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Iga Swiatek a Pole apart with the strengths to take Paris by storm
Sat, 21 May 2022 17:00:24 GMT

The new world No 1 is taking nothing for granted but after taking a hard path to the top can recapture the French Open

As the new tennis season slowly commenced last year, the then 19-year-old Iga Swiatek was still in the process of testing the limits of her own strengths. The beginning of 2021 had marked her first tournaments since a transcendent French Open title in October 2020 and after admirably reaching the Australian Open fourth round, Swiatek lost in three tough sets to the former world No 1 Simona Halep.

When she spoke after that match, Swiatek marvelled at how much more space Halep had within her game to alter her tactics and solve problems on the court, something she thought she lacked. “I think that’s the difference between the champions and less experienced players,” she said, smiling sheepishly. “Because I didn’t feel like I had many options.”

Continue reading...
Match ID: 39 Score: 25.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

How fears of electromagnetic radiation spawned a snake-oil industry
2022-05-21T16:22:17+00:00
How fears of electromagnetic radiation spawned a snake-oil industry submitted by /u/signed7
[link] [comments]

Match ID: 40 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

China, U.S. are racing to make billions from mining the moon’s minerals
2022-05-21T16:05:10+00:00
China, U.S. are racing to make billions from mining the moon’s minerals submitted by /u/Sorin61
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Match ID: 41 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

DCCC Chair and Rep. Mondaire Jones Flee Blue Districts, a Bright-Red Warning for Democrats
Sat, 21 May 2022 15:57:13 +0000

A court-ordered redistricting process nearly pitted Squad member Jamaal Bowman against progressive Jones, but Jones instead is targeting a new open seat in New York City.

The post DCCC Chair and Rep. Mondaire Jones Flee Blue Districts, a Bright-Red Warning for Democrats appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 42 Score: 25.00 source: theintercept.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Dina Asher-Smith beats Shericka Jackson to win Birmingham Diamond League 100m
Sat, 21 May 2022 15:40:24 GMT
Great Britain's Dina Asher-Smith sees off a high-quality field to win her first 100m outing of the season at the Birmingham Diamond League meeting.
Match ID: 43 Score: 25.00 source: www.bbc.co.uk age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

EU Planning to Force Apple to Give Developers Access to All Hardware and Software Features
2022-05-21T15:00:33+00:00
EU Planning to Force Apple to Give Developers Access to All Hardware and Software Features submitted by /u/IcantBeYoursJJ
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Match ID: 44 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Iain Duncan Smith calls for benefits to rise in line with inflation
Sat, 21 May 2022 14:31:45 GMT

Tory MP says immediate increase in universal credit would provide ‘shield’ against cost of living crisis

The former Conservative leader Sir Iain Duncan Smith has called for benefits to be immediately brought in line with inflation to provide a “shield” against the sting of mounting living costs.

He said rebates and discretionary funds represented “a step in the wrong direction for tackling poverty”, arguing it would be better to uplift universal credit (UC) as it “links benefits to work”.

Continue reading...
Match ID: 45 Score: 25.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Labor Officials Find Amazon Threatened Pro-Union Workers With Wage Cuts
2022-05-21T12:57:43+00:00
Labor Officials Find Amazon Threatened Pro-Union Workers With Wage Cuts submitted by /u/psychothumbs
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Match ID: 46 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Solar panels will become mandatory on all new EU buildings
2022-05-21T12:46:21+00:00
Solar panels will become mandatory on all new EU buildings submitted by /u/Avieshek
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Match ID: 47 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Tamal Ray’s recipe for grilled aubergine salad
Sat, 21 May 2022 12:00:19 GMT

Aubergines grilled with oil and cumin, and served alongside roast grapes, feta, croutons and balsamic vinegar

It took me a while to love aubergines. As a child, my palate couldn’t appreciate my mum’s begun bhaja, a simple Bengali preparation of fried aubergines with turmeric and salt. “They’re too slimy!” I’d wail as she rolled her eyes and served them to less ungrateful members of the family. Years later, I rediscovered them through the myriad ways they appear in Middle Eastern food: stuffed and grilled and turned into delicious dips. And, in cooking them myself, I learned to love them in Indian cuisine, too – even the dreaded begun bhaja of my youth.

UK readers: click to buy these ingredients from Ocado

Continue reading...
Match ID: 48 Score: 25.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

'Security researchers' aka hackers make $800k in prize money for exploiting Windows 11 and Teams
2022-05-21T11:27:58+00:00
'Security researchers' aka hackers make $800k in prize money for exploiting Windows 11 and Teams submitted by /u/Sorin61
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Match ID: 49 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Biden administration lays out plan for four carbon-capture facilities
Sat, 21 May 2022 11:00:27 +0000
Big infrastructure package includes funds for the underdeveloped technology.
Match ID: 50 Score: 25.00 source: arstechnica.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

After Buffalo, Will Corporate America Turn Against the Murdochs and Fox News?
Sat, 21 May 2022 11:00:52 +0000

Why the Murdochs should become the next Sacklers.

The post After Buffalo, Will Corporate America Turn Against the Murdochs and Fox News? appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 51 Score: 25.00 source: theintercept.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Trump shares CPAC Hungary platform with notorious racist and antisemite
Sat, 21 May 2022 10:30:16 GMT

Hungarian talkshow host who has called Jews ‘stinking excrement’ and Roma ‘animals’ addresses rightwing conference

A notorious Hungarian racist who has called Jews “stinking excrement”, referred to Roma as “animals” and used racial epithets to describe Black people, was a featured speaker at a major gathering of US Republicans in Budapest.

Zsolt Bayer took the stage at the second day of the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) Hungary, a convention that also featured speeches from Donald Trump, Fox News host Tucker Carlson, and Trump’s former White House chief of staff, Mark Meadows.

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Match ID: 52 Score: 25.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Hyundai to build $5.5 bn electric vehicle plant in US
2022-05-21T09:52:03+00:00
Hyundai to build $5.5 bn electric vehicle plant in US submitted by /u/Sorin61
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Match ID: 53 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

FBI Provides Chicago Police With Fake Online Identities for “Social Media Exploitation” Team: Internal documents also reveal that police can take over informants’ social media accounts and pose as them online.
2022-05-21T07:46:00+00:00
FBI Provides Chicago Police With Fake Online Identities for “Social Media Exploitation” Team: Internal documents also reveal that police can take over informants’ social media accounts and pose as them online. submitted by /u/breadiestcrustybrad
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Match ID: 54 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Bolsolão do SUS: dinheiro da saúde no bolso do Centrão
Sat, 21 May 2022 06:00:50 +0000

Sem critérios técnicos, Bolsonaro deu bilhões do SUS para comprar apoio de aliados políticos.

The post Bolsolão do SUS: dinheiro da saúde no bolso do Centrão appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 55 Score: 25.00 source: theintercept.com age: 0 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Tesla Asking Owners to Limit Charging During Texas Heatwave Isn’t a Good Sign
2022-05-21T05:06:53+00:00
Tesla Asking Owners to Limit Charging During Texas Heatwave Isn’t a Good Sign submitted by /u/Cascading_Neurons
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Match ID: 56 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Post Politics Now: No near end in sight for Pa. GOP Senate primary
Fri, 20 May 2022 20:08:56 EDT
President Biden was in South Korea on Friday in the first visit to Asia of his presidency, kicking off a five-day tour designed to underscore his administration’s commitment to the region in the face of a rising China.
Match ID: 57 Score: 25.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Analysis: Tesla brand threatened by Musk harassment claim, criticism of Democrats
2022-05-20T23:55:16+00:00
Analysis: Tesla brand threatened by Musk harassment claim, criticism of Democrats submitted by /u/realguiders
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Match ID: 58 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Facebook secretly planted op-eds to lobby against tech reform
2022-05-20T23:26:46+00:00
Facebook secretly planted op-eds to lobby against tech reform submitted by /u/kry_some_more
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Match ID: 59 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Biden kicks off Asia trip lauding tech cooperation with South Korea
Fri, 20 May 2022 18:02:09 EDT
President Biden's five-day trip to South Korea and Japan is meant to emphasize U.S. commitment to the region in the face of a more assertive China.
Match ID: 60 Score: 25.00 source: www.washingtonpost.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Analysis of prehistoric feces shows Stonehenge people had parasites
Fri, 20 May 2022 21:59:15 +0000
Fossilized fecal analysis sheds light on prehistoric dietary habits and social behavior.
Match ID: 61 Score: 25.00 source: arstechnica.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Chicago cops can use fake social media profiles to spy on you, with the FBI's help.
2022-05-20T21:21:50+00:00
Chicago cops can use fake social media profiles to spy on you, with the FBI's help. submitted by /u/AdamCannon
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Match ID: 62 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

A second Apple Store union election will take place next month
2022-05-20T19:40:11+00:00
A second Apple Store union election will take place next month submitted by /u/Sorin61
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Match ID: 63 Score: 25.00 source: www.reddit.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Israeli Official Claims Anger at Killing of Shireen Abu Akleh Is Rooted in "Anti-Jewish Racism"
Fri, 20 May 2022 18:59:18 +0000

Israel’s antisemitism envoy says only racism can explain the “hateful” reactions of Rashida Tlaib, Ilhan Omar, and Bella Hadid.

The post Israeli Official Claims Anger at Killing of Shireen Abu Akleh Is Rooted in “Anti-Jewish Racism” appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 64 Score: 25.00 source: theintercept.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Remembering 1982 IEEE President Robert Larson
Fri, 20 May 2022 18:00:01 +0000


Robert E. Larson, 1982 IEEE president, died on 10 March at the age of 83.

An active volunteer who held many high-level positions throughout the organization, Larson was the 1975–1976 president of the IEEE Control Systems Society and also served as IEEE Foundation president.

Larson worked as a power engineer for Hughes Aircraft, IBM, the Stanford Research Institute (now SRI International), and other companies. He helped to found Systems Control, a computer system designer and manufacturer in Palo Alto, Calif., and he was its chief executive for almost 15 years.

He also volunteered with IEEE Smart Village, a program that brings electricity—as well as educational and employment opportunities—to remote communities.

Smart Village cofounder IEEE Life Fellow Ray Larsen says Larson rarely missed the program’s biweekly meetings.

“He and his wife, Sue, became generous donors. Bob and I often had lunch, where I updated him on our latest challenges,” Larsen says. “It was a great honor to benefit from his deep wisdom, constant support, and friendship.”

CHOOSING ENGINEERING

Larson was born in Stockton, Calif., where his father was a physics professor at the University of the Pacific. In 1942 his father was recruited to work on the Manhattan Project, so the family moved to Oak Ridge, Tenn., where the plutonium and the uranium enrichment plants were located.

“Oak Ridge was a very scientifically oriented community,” especially during World War II, Larson said in a 2009 oral history conducted by the IEEE History Center. “Therefore, I was slated to go into science in some respect. My father’s preference was that I would become a medical doctor, but I got interested in computers at an early age. I built computers when I was in high school using telephone relays and things of that sort.”

He earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering in 1960 from MIT. While pursuing his degree, he worked at IBM on its first transistorized supercomputer: IBM 7030, known as Stretch. The computer’s development led to software and hardware such as multiprogramming, memory protection, and CPUs to be incorporated in IBM’s line of computers.

Larson moved back to California to continue his education in “warmer weather,” according to his oral history. He received a master’s degree in EE from Stanford in 1961, then continued at the school as a doctoral student. He conducted his thesis research at Hughes Aircraft, where he designed computers for spacecraft.

After graduating in 1964, he joined SRI, where he worked on ballistic missile defense and electric power systems. While there, he developed tracking technology for missile reentry vehicles. He also designed technology for an air defense system that could remotely shoot down enemy missiles.

He left SRI after four years and, along with several coworkers, founded Systems Control. The company was sold to British Petroleum in 1982.

From 1983 to 2012, Larson served as a general partner and technical advisor to the Woodside Fund, a venture-capital firm in Redwood City, Calif.

He was a consulting professor in the engineering-economics systems department at Stanford from 1973 to 1988.

Larson was the founding president of the U.S.-China Green Energy Council in 2008. The nonprofit, based in Silicon Valley, promotes collaboration between the two countries to help develop technology to combat climate change.

“Larson’s contribution in the U.S.-China collaboration was priceless,” the organization’s leaders wrote on its website. “He was a role model to not only his peers but also to the next generation. His voice and smile will always remain in our hearts.”

AN ACTIVE VOLUNTEER

He joined the Institute of Radio Engineers, one of IEEE’s predecessor societies, in 1958 as a student member at the suggestion of his father.

Larson told the History Center that his father explained to him that if he was serious about working with computers, he should “join an organization that will give you information and people you can talk to and network with.”

He was honored with the 1968 Outstanding Young Electrical Engineer Award from IEEE-Eta Kappa Nu, IEEE’s honor society.

Larson began volunteering in 1968 as an editorial board member of IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control. He went on to become the editor and served for nearly five years.

He then served on the IEEE Control Systems Society’s administration committee and became the society’s 1975 president. He was 1978 Division I director, and vice president, Technical Activities. He was elected as IEEE president in 1982 and also served as IEEE Foundation president.

Larson was a member of the IEEE Heritage Circle—a cumulative giving donor recognition group. He pledged more than US $10,000 to support IEEE programs such as the History Center and Smart Village. His family made a donation in his memory to Smart Village through the IEEE Foundation. The family has invited others to make donations in his name.

To share your condolences or memories of Robert Larson, please use the commenting form below.


Match ID: 65 Score: 25.00 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

New USB-C dock triples M1 Mac external monitor support, Anker says
Fri, 20 May 2022 17:12:17 +0000
Limiting 4K to 30 Hz will be a deal-breaker for some.
Match ID: 66 Score: 25.00 source: arstechnica.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

In this jubilee year, the appeal of the monarchy is still strong | Letters
Fri, 20 May 2022 17:08:53 GMT

War, slavery and lack of social mobility are not limited to monarchical nations, writes Ian Roberts; plus letters from Harry Dickinson and Jenny Bushell

With regard to Peter Tatchell’s article (No thanks, Ma’am. For LGBT campaigners like me, your jubilee is nothing to celebrate, 15 May), perhaps it can be suggested to Mr Tatchell that republicanism has, historically as well as now, never gained ground in the UK and that republican nations are just as guilty – if not more so – of many of the things that Mr Tatchell accuses the monarchy of.

The monarchy in the UK is immensely popular, albeit with a small core of detractors. The monarchy may be drawn from a “small circle” of society, but the US presidency is no less guilty of such a charge. Slavery and war? Were not some of the early US presidents themselves slaveowners, with Thomas Jefferson fathering children by an enslaved black woman? The US still has a far worse race relations record than the UK.

Continue reading...
Match ID: 67 Score: 25.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Rite Aid and its Bartell Drugs has COVID-19 boosters for 5-to-11 year olds available
Fri, 20 May 2022 16:36:51 GMT

Rite Air Corp. said Friday that the COVID-19 boosters for 5-to-11 year olds made by Pfizer Inc. and BioNTech SE are available at its drug stores and at Bartell Drugs, which it owns. The booster for that age group was authorized by the Food and Drug Administration earlier this week, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended Thursday in favor of kids that age group getting the booster five months after their second dose. Rite Aid appointments for getting the booster can be made Friday by a parent or guardian. Rite Aid's stock slumped 4.4% in midday trading. It has plunged 63.2% year to date, while shares of rival CVS Health Corp. have slipped 9.8% and the S&P 500 has declined 19.4%.

Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news.


Match ID: 68 Score: 25.00 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Oklahoma’s Total Abortion Ban Will Mean Surveillance, Criminalization, and Chaos
Fri, 20 May 2022 16:15:08 +0000

The state’s new ban is the most extreme in the country, going further than Texas’s notorious S.B. 8 by banning abortion after fertilization.

The post Oklahoma’s Total Abortion Ban Will Mean Surveillance, Criminalization, and Chaos appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 69 Score: 25.00 source: theintercept.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Acer Goes Big on Glasses-Free, 3D Monitors—Look Out, VR
Fri, 20 May 2022 14:54:57 +0000


Acer, the world’s fifth largest PC brand, wants to take the growing AR/VR market by the horns with its SpatialLabs glasses-free stereoscopic 3D displays.

First teased in 2021 in a variant of Acer’s ConceptD 7 laptop, the technology expands this summer in a pair of portable monitors, the SpatialLabs View and View Pro, and select Acer Predator gaming laptops. The launch is paired with artificial-intelligence-powered software for converting existing 2D content into stereoscopic 3D.

“We see a convergence of virtual and reality,” Jane Hsu, head of business Development for SpatialLabs, said in an interview. “It’s a different form for users to start interacting with a virtual world.” Glasses-free stereoscopic 3D isn’t new.

Evolutionary, not revolutionary

The technology has powered several niche products and prototypes, such as Sony’s Spatial Reality Display, but its most famous debut was Nintendo’s 3DS portable game console.

The 3DS filtered two images through a display layer called a parallax barrier. This barrier controlled the angle an image reached the user’s eyes to create the 3D effect. Because angle was important, the 3DS used cameras that detected the user’s eyes and adjusted the image to compensate for viewing angle.

“The PC in 2022 is encountering a lot of problems.”
—Jerry Kao, Acer

Acer’s technology is similar. It also displays two images which are filtered through an “optical layer” and has cameras to track and compensate for the user’s viewing angle.

So, what’s different this time?

“The fundamental difference is that the computing power is way different, and resolution is way different,” said Hsu. “The Nintendo, that was 800 by 240. In a sense, the technology is the same, but over time it has improved for a crystal-clear, high-resolution experience.”

Resolution is important to this form of glasses-free 3D. Because it renders two images to create the 3D effect, the resolution of the display is cut in half on the horizontal axis when 3D is on. The 3DS cut resolution to 400 by 240 when 3D was on and blurry visuals were a common complaint among critics.

Acer’s SpatialLabs laptops and displays are a big improvement. Each provides native 4K (3,840 by 2,160 resolution) in 2D. That’s 43 times the pixel count of Nintendo’s 3DS. Turning 3D on shaves resolution to 1,920 by 2,160, which, while lower, is still sharper than that of a 27-inch 4K monitor.

Hsu says advancements in AI compute are also key. Partners like Nvidia and Intel can now accelerate AI in hardware, a feature that wasn’t common a half decade ago.

Acer has harnessed this for SpatialLabs GO, a software utility that can convert full-screen content from 2D to stereoscopic 3D. This should make SpatialLabs useful with a wider range of content. It can also help creators generate content for use in stereoscopic 3D by importing and converting existing assets.

A new angle on augmented reality

Acer was a lead partner in Microsoft’s push for mixed-reality headsets. They were a flop, and their failure taught Acer hard lessons about how people approach AR/VR hardware in the real world.

“Acer spent a lot bringing VR headsets to market, but...it was not very successful,” Acer Co-COO Jerry Kao said in an interview. “There were limitations. It’s not comfortable, or it’s expensive, and you need space around you. So, we wanted to address this.”

SpatialLabs is a complementary alternative. Creators can use Spatial Labs to achieve a 3D effect in their home office without pushing aside furniture. The Acer View Pro, meant for commercial use, may have a future in retail displays, a use that headsets can't address.

A display in a store shows a shoe that seems to be coming out of the screen. The View Pro display is built for use in kiosks and retail displays.Acer

Most of the SpatialLabs product line, including the ConceptD 7 laptop and View displays, lean toward creative professionals using programs like Maya and Blender to create 3D content. Acer says its software suite has “out-of-the-box support for all major file formats.” It recently added support for Datasmith, a plug-in used to import assets to Epic’s Unreal Engine.

But the technology is also coming to Predator gaming laptops for glasses-free stereoscopic 3D in select titles like Forza Horizon 5 and The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt. Gaming seems a natural fit given its history in Nintendo’s handheld, and Hsu thinks it will help attract mainstream attention.

“When the Turn 10 team [developer of the Forza Horizon series] saw what we had done with Forza Horizon 5, they were like, ‘Wow, this is so great!’ ” said Hsu. “They said, ‘You know what? I think I can build the scene with even more depth.’ And this is just the beginning.”

Does glasses-free 3D really stand a chance?

SpatialLabs brings gains in resolution and performance, but it’s far from a surefire hit. Acer is the only PC maker currently pursuing the hardware. Going it alone won’t be easy.

“While the tech seems quite appealing, it will likely remain a niche product that’ll be used in rare instances by designers or developers rather than the average consumer,” Jitesh Ubrani, research manager at IDC, said in an email. He thinks Acer could find it difficult to deliver on price and availability, “both of which are tough to do for such a fringe technology.”

I asked Hsu how Acer will solve these issues. “In a way he’s right, it is difficult. We’re building this ourselves,” said Hsu. “But also, the hardware is more mature.”

Kao chimed in to say SpatialLabs will stand out in what might be weak year for home computers. “The PC in 2022 is encountering a lot of problems,” Kao said. He sees that as a motivation, not a barrier, for novel technology on the PC.

“Intel, Google, Microsoft, and a lot of people, they have technology,” said Kao. “But they don’t know how to leverage that technology in the product and deliver the experience to specific people. That is what Acer is good at.”


Match ID: 70 Score: 25.00 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

New study estimates how long mined metals circulate before being lost
Fri, 20 May 2022 14:49:13 +0000
In some cases, we're throwing out one metal in the process of extracting another.
Match ID: 71 Score: 25.00 source: arstechnica.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

‘Now we have to deal with it’: what’s going on in the UK with monkeypox?
Fri, 20 May 2022 14:09:37 GMT

It’s not the first time the virus has been found in Britain but now there are chains of transmission

The person was sick when they boarded the plane. Five days before leaving Nigeria for Britain, they noticed a rash that spread into a scattering of fluid-filled bumps. When the plane touched down on 4 May, they wasted no time. The person attended hospital where doctors, alerted by their recent travel, immediately suspected monkeypox. The patient was isolated and a doctor, clad in full PPE, took a swab from a blister on their skin.

Because monkeypox is listed as a “high-consequence infectious disease”, the situation moved fast. The sample was sent to Porton Down science park in Wiltshire where the UK Health Security Agency’s rare and imported pathogens laboratory swiftly ran a PCR test. This confirmed the infection, which the agency announced the next day, on 7 May.

Continue reading...
Match ID: 72 Score: 25.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Dallagnol divide o palco com a nata do bolsonarismo evangélico em SP
Fri, 20 May 2022 14:00:56 +0000

Ex-Lava Jato estrela evento com Damares Alves, André Mendonça, Tarcísio de Freitas, um deputado estadual misógino e um prefeito condenado por improbidade.

The post Dallagnol divide o palco com a nata do bolsonarismo evangélico em SP appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 73 Score: 25.00 source: theintercept.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

'A dangerous neighbour': why Finland and Sweden want to join Nato – video explainer
Fri, 20 May 2022 12:58:32 GMT

Finland and Sweden have together submitted requests to join Nato, in what is seen as a seismic shift in Europe's security architecture. Jon Henley, the Guardian's Europe correspondent, looks at why the Nordic countries forwent years of neutrality, and what the move means for the war in Ukraine

Continue reading...
Match ID: 74 Score: 25.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Foghorn's stock drops 23% after FDA puts partial hold on clinical trial
Fri, 20 May 2022 12:15:08 GMT

Shares of Foghorn Therapeutics Inc. were down 23.7% in premarket trading on Friday, the day after the company said U.S. regulators had placed a partial clinical hold on a Phase 1 clinical trial assessing an experimental therapy for relapsed and/or refractory acute myelogenous leukemia. The Food and Drug Administration has asked for a review of the safety database, as well as information about risk mitigation and clinical activity across doses. Foghorn's stock has declined 49.3% this year, while the broader S&P 500 is down 18.1%.

Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news.


Match ID: 75 Score: 25.00 source: www.marketwatch.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

FBI Provides Chicago Police With Fake Online Identities for "Social Media Exploitation" Team
Fri, 20 May 2022 11:30:38 +0000

Internal documents also reveal that police can take over informants’ social media accounts and pose as them online.

The post FBI Provides Chicago Police With Fake Online Identities for “Social Media Exploitation” Team appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 76 Score: 25.00 source: theintercept.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Bluetooth Flaw Allows Remote Unlocking of Digital Locks
2022-05-20T11:02:14Z

Locks that use Bluetooth Low Energy to authenticate keys are vulnerable to remote unlocking. The research focused on Teslas, but the exploit is generalizable.

In a video shared with Reuters, NCC Group researcher Sultan Qasim Khan was able to open and then drive a Tesla using a small relay device attached to a laptop which bridged a large gap between the Tesla and the Tesla owner’s phone.

“This proves that any product relying on a trusted BLE connection is vulnerable to attacks even from the other side of the world,” the UK-based firm said in a statement, referring to the Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) protocol—technology used in millions of cars and smart locks which automatically open when in close proximity to an authorised device...


Match ID: 77 Score: 25.00 source: www.schneier.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Nuclear Fusion Is Already Facing a Fuel Crisis
Fri, 20 May 2022 11:00:00 +0000
It doesn’t even work yet, but nuclear fusion has encountered a shortage of tritium, the key fuel source for the most prominent experimental reactors.
Match ID: 78 Score: 25.00 source: www.wired.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

‘Sleepwalking through extinction’: China urged to end delays to Cop15 summit
Fri, 20 May 2022 10:56:24 GMT

Covid lockdowns in host country frustrate scientists as no date in sight for key UN conservation conference after two years of delays


China has been urged to name a date for a key UN nature summit this year, amid growing frustration with Beijing and concerns among experts that we are “sleepwalking through this cataclysmic climate extinction”.

After two years of delays, governments had been scheduled to meet in Kunming, China, for Cop15 in late April to negotiate this decade’s targets to halt and reverse the rampant destruction of ecosystems and wildlife crucial to human civilisation. It had been hoped the summit would be a “Paris moment” for biodiversity, with China holding the presidency for a major UN environmental agreement for the first time.

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Match ID: 79 Score: 25.00 source: www.theguardian.com age: 1 day
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Ukraine war: One Russian's anti-war protest on the side of his shopping centre
Thu, 19 May 2022 23:40:04 GMT
Dmitry Skurikhin has listed the Ukrainian towns attacked by Russia on the side of his shopping centre.
Match ID: 80 Score: 25.00 source: www.bbc.co.uk age: 2 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Pennsylvania Surges Left at the Polls
Thu, 19 May 2022 21:09:53 +0000

Izzy Smith-Wade-El talks about his primary win in the race for a Pennsylvania state House seat.

The post Pennsylvania Surges Left at the Polls appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 81 Score: 25.00 source: theintercept.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

The Online Spaces That Enable Mass Shooters
Thu, 19 May 2022 20:40:16 +0000
The eighteen-year-old who committed a racist killing spree in Buffalo last weekend spent many months developing his plans on the Internet.
Match ID: 82 Score: 25.00 source: www.newyorker.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Jeffrey Sachs Presents Evidence of Possible Lab Origin of Covid-19
Thu, 19 May 2022 20:00:50 +0000

An article in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences calls for an independent investigation of information held by U.S.-based institutions that could shed light on the origins of Covid.

The post Jeffrey Sachs Presents Evidence of Possible Lab Origin of Covid-19 appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 83 Score: 25.00 source: theintercept.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

DARPA Wants a Better, Badder Caspian Sea Monster
Thu, 19 May 2022 19:31:02 +0000


Arguably, the primary job of any military organization is moving enormous amounts of stuff from one place to another as quickly and efficiently as possible. Some of that stuff is weaponry, but the vast majority are things that support that weaponry—fuel, spare parts, personnel, and so on. At the moment, the U.S. military has two options when it comes to transporting large amounts of payload. Option one is boats (a sealift), which are efficient, but also slow and require ports. Option two is planes (an airlift), which are faster by a couple of orders of magnitude, but also expensive and require runways.

To solve this, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) wants to combine traditional sealift and airlift with the Liberty Lifter program, which aims to “design, build, and flight test an affordable, innovative, and disruptive seaplane” that “enables efficient theater-range transport of large payloads at speeds far exceeding existing sea lift platforms.”

DARPA

DARPA is asking for a design like this to take advantage of ground effect, which occurs when an aircraft’s wing deflects air downward and proximity to the ground generates a cushioning effect due to the compression of air between the bottom of the wing and the ground. This boosts lift and lowers drag to yield a substantial overall improvement in efficiency. Ground effect works on both water and land, but you can take advantage of it for only so long on land before your aircraft runs into something. Which is why oceans are the ideal place for these aircraft—or ships, depending on your perspective.

During the late 1980s, the Soviets (and later the Russians) leveraged ground effect in the design of a handful of awesomely bizarre ships and aircraft. There’s the VVA-14, which was also an airplane, along with the vehicle shown in DARPA’s video above, the Lun-class ekranoplan, which operated until the late 1990s. The video clip really does not do this thing justice, so here’s a better picture, taken a couple of years ago:

Oblique overhead view of a huge grey seaplane on the water Instagram

The Lun (only one was ever made) had a wingspan of 44 meters and was powered by eight turbojet engines. It flew about 4 meters above the water at speeds of up to 550 kilometers per hour, and could transport almost 100,000 kilograms of cargo for 2,000 km. It was based on an earlier, even larger prototype (the largest aircraft in the world at the time) that the CIA spotted in satellite images in 1967 and which seems to have seriously freaked them out. It was nicknamed the Caspian Sea Monster, and it wasn’t until the 1980s that the West understood what it was and how it worked.

In the mid 1990s, DARPA itself took a serious look at a stupendously large ground-effect vehicle of its own, the Aerocon Dash 1.6 wingship. The concept image below is of a 4.5-million-kg vehicle, 175 meters long with a 100-meter wingspan, powered by 20 (!) jet engines:

A black and white wireframe drawing of a huge streamlined aircraft Wikipedia

With a range of almost 20,000 km at over 700 km/h, the wingship could have carried 3,000 passengers or 1.4 million kg of cargo. By 1994, though, DARPA had decided that the potential billion-dollar project to build a wingship like this was too risky, and canceled the whole thing.

A concept image of a massive grey seaplane skimming over the ocean

Less than 10 years later, Boeing’s Phantom Works started exploring an enormous ground-effect aircraft, the Pelican Ultra Large Transport Aircraft. The Pelican would have been even larger than the Aerocon wingship, with a wingspan of 152 meters and a payload of 1.2 million kg—that’s about 178 shipping containers’ worth. Unlike the wingship, the Pelican would take advantage of ground effect to boost efficiency only in transit above water, but would otherwise use runways like a normal aircraft and be able to reach flight altitudes of 7,500 meters. Operating as a traditional aircraft and with an optimal payload, the Pelican would have a range of about 12,000 km. In ground effect, however, the range would have increased to 18,500 km, illustrating the appeal of designs like these. But Boeing dropped the project in 2005 to focus on lower cost, less risky options.

We’d be remiss if we didn’t at least briefly mention two other massive aircraft: the H-4 Hercules, the cargo seaplane built by Hughes Aircraft Co. in the 1940s, and the Stratolaunch carrier aircraft, which features a twin-fuselage configuration that DARPA seems to be favoring in its concept video for some reason.

From the sound of DARPA’s announcement, they’re looking for something a bit more like the Pelican than the Aerocon Dash or the Lun. DARPA wants the Liberty Lifter to be able to sustain flight out of ground effect if necessary, although it’s expected to spend most of its time over water for efficiency. It won’t use runways on land at all, though, and should be able to stay out on the water for 4 to 6 weeks at a time, operating even in rough seas—a significant challenge for ground-effect aircraft.

DARPA is looking for an operational range of 7,500 km, with a maximum payload of at least 90,000 kg, including the ability to launch and recover amphibious vehicles. The hardest thing DARPA is asking for could be that, unlike most other X-planes, the Liberty Lifter should incorporate a “low cost design and construction philosophy” inspired by the mass-produced Liberty ships of World War II.

With US $15 million to be awarded to up to two Liberty Lifter concepts, DARPA is hoping that at least one of those concepts will pass a system-level critical design review in 2025. If everything goes well after that, the first flight of a full-scale prototype vehicle could happen as early as 2027.


Match ID: 84 Score: 25.00 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 2 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Israel Used U.S. Weapons to Destroy U.S. Assets and Aid Projects in Gaza
Thu, 19 May 2022 18:43:50 +0000

Documents show that in 2021, arms made and funded by the United States destroyed UNRWA schools, USAID projects, and a Coca-Cola plant.

The post Israel Used U.S. Weapons to Destroy U.S. Assets and Aid Projects in Gaza appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 85 Score: 25.00 source: theintercept.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

A Brasil Paralelo não quer que você leia esta entrevista
Thu, 19 May 2022 18:05:12 +0000

Conversamos com Mayara Balestro, historiadora que foi perseguida e ameaçada por pesquisar a produtora.

The post A Brasil Paralelo não quer que você leia esta entrevista appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 86 Score: 25.00 source: theintercept.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Twitter deal leaves Elon Musk with no easy way out
Thu, 19 May 2022 17:54:48 +0000
Strength of $44B agreement comes into focus as Musk appears to have second thoughts.
Match ID: 87 Score: 25.00 source: arstechnica.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Israeli Investigation Into Killing of Palestinian American Journalist Ends Before It Begins
Thu, 19 May 2022 17:39:17 +0000

Israel won’t investigate soldiers who fired in the direction of Shireen Abu Akleh, even though new evidence undermines their account of what happened.

The post Israeli Investigation Into Killing of Palestinian American Journalist Ends Before It Begins appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 88 Score: 25.00 source: theintercept.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

Websites that Collect Your Data as You Type
2022-05-19T11:23:50Z

A surprising number of websites include JavaScript keyloggers that collect everything you type as you type it, not just when you submit a form.

Researchers from KU Leuven, Radboud University, and University of Lausanne crawled and analyzed the top 100,000 websites, looking at scenarios in which a user is visiting a site while in the European Union and visiting a site from the United States. They found that 1,844 websites gathered an EU user’s email address without their consent, and a staggering 2,950 logged a US user’s email in some form. Many of the sites seemingly do not intend to conduct the data-logging but incorporate third-party marketing and analytics services that cause the behavior...


Match ID: 89 Score: 25.00 source: www.schneier.com age: 2 days
qualifiers: 25.00 mit

The NSA Says that There are No Known Flaws in NIST’s Quantum-Resistant Algorithms
2022-05-16T11:34:24Z

Rob Joyce, the director of cybersecurity at the NSA, said so in an interview:

The NSA already has classified quantum-resistant algorithms of its own that it developed over many years, said Joyce. But it didn’t enter any of its own in the contest. The agency’s mathematicians, however, worked with NIST to support the process, trying to crack the algorithms in order to test their merit.

“Those candidate algorithms that NIST is running the competitions on all appear strong, secure, and what we need for quantum resistance,” Joyce said. “We’ve worked against all of them to make sure they are solid.”...


Match ID: 90 Score: 22.86 source: www.schneier.com age: 5 days
qualifiers: 14.29 mit, 8.57 aliens

How Vladimir Putin rejuvenated Nato – podcast
Thu, 19 May 2022 02:00:06 GMT

Finland and Sweden this week formally applied to join Nato after years of non-alignment. Jon Henley reports on how the Ukraine war has given the alliance a new lease of life

For decades, Sweden and Finland have held back from joining other western nations in the Nato military alliance. For Sweden, it would have compromised its longstanding neutrality. For Finland, it was a more pragmatic matter of not appearing to antagonise Russia, with which it shares an 810-mile border and against which it fought brutal 20th-century wars.

But as Jon Henley tells Michael Safi, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine (another non-Nato European country) changed everything. This week the two countries formally submitted their applications to join the military alliance. It is a move that has been met with hostility and threats by Russia, but it’s one that injects new life into an alliance that appeared to be faltering. With defence budgets being cut across Europe, Donald Trump’s unpredictable presidency and a drifting sense of purpose, Nato’s future was being openly questioned. Not any more.

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Match ID: 91 Score: 21.43 source: www.theguardian.com age: 3 days
qualifiers: 21.43 mit

Civilian Victim of U.S. Drone Strike Starts GoFundMe to Save His Legs — and His Life
Wed, 18 May 2022 18:47:30 +0000

Because of a broken civilian casualty compensation system, the U.S. military never made a payment to Yemeni drone strike survivor Adel Al Manthari.

The post Civilian Victim of U.S. Drone Strike Starts GoFundMe to Save His Legs — and His Life appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 92 Score: 21.43 source: theintercept.com age: 3 days
qualifiers: 21.43 mit

Military-Industrial Complex Is Itching to Send “Hunter-Killer” Drones to Ukraine
Wed, 18 May 2022 18:03:05 +0000

The dangerous, restricted unmanned fighter planes would be a major step up in the arms the U.S. is giving to Ukraine.

The post Military-Industrial Complex Is Itching to Send “Hunter-Killer” Drones to Ukraine appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 93 Score: 21.43 source: theintercept.com age: 3 days
qualifiers: 21.43 mit

Google and Amazon Face Shareholder Revolt Over Israeli Defense Work
Wed, 18 May 2022 16:27:06 +0000

"Project Nimbus" would insulate the Israeli government's cloud computing from political pressures stemming from the military occupation of Palestine.

The post Google and Amazon Face Shareholder Revolt Over Israeli Defense Work appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 94 Score: 21.43 source: theintercept.com age: 3 days
qualifiers: 21.43 mit

Roe’s Fall Will Limit Screening for Fatal Congenital Conditions
Wed, 18 May 2022 16:03:21 +0000
Many life-limiting conditions can only be detected 12 weeks into pregnancy—but some US states are planning to set the abortion limit much earlier.
Match ID: 95 Score: 21.43 source: www.wired.com age: 3 days
qualifiers: 21.43 mit

Abortion Activists Need to Win Back the Culture Before We Can Win Back the Court
Wed, 18 May 2022 11:00:53 +0000

Make abortion normal again.

The post Abortion Activists Need to Win Back the Culture Before We Can Win Back the Court appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 96 Score: 21.43 source: theintercept.com age: 3 days
qualifiers: 21.43 mit

Overturning Roe v. Wade: "Irrational, Aggressive, and Extremely Dangerous"
Wed, 18 May 2022 10:01:57 +0000

Jordan Smith and law professor Melissa Murray discuss the Supreme Court’s leaked draft decision and its implications.

The post Overturning Roe v. Wade: “Irrational, Aggressive, and Extremely Dangerous” appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 97 Score: 21.43 source: theintercept.com age: 3 days
qualifiers: 21.43 mit

Por que os militares se metem quando e como querem na política – e sem medo de punição
Wed, 18 May 2022 10:00:19 +0000

O Brasil tem mecanismos legais tímidos para o controle civil das Forças Armadas. E eles pouco são utilizados por governantes e parlamentares.

The post Por que os militares se metem quando e como querem na política – e sem medo de punição appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 98 Score: 21.43 source: theintercept.com age: 3 days
qualifiers: 21.43 mit

Democratic Voters Deliver Stinging Rebuke to Party's Manchin-Sinema Wing
Wed, 18 May 2022 06:13:11 +0000

Voters shrugged off an obscene amount of spending from super PACs to send a message to Democrats: Do something.

The post Democratic Voters Deliver Stinging Rebuke to Party’s Manchin-Sinema Wing appeared first on The Intercept.


Match ID: 99 Score: 21.43 source: theintercept.com age: 3 days
qualifiers: 21.43 mit

The ‘carbon bombs’ set to blow up the world’s climate pledges
Wed, 18 May 2022 02:00:37 GMT

A Guardian investigation has revealed 195 oil and gas projects known as ‘carbon bombs’ that could trigger catastrophic climate breakdown if allowed to continue. Damian Carrington reports

During emotional scenes in Glasgow last year, world leaders came together to agree to “phase down” the use of coal. But absent from the UN climate summit was any similar pledge about oil and gas, the fossil fuels that make up more than half of the world’s energy production.

The environment editor, Damian Carrington, tells Michael Safi that a Guardian investigation has laid bare the reality of what those oil and gas projects add up to: 646 gigatonnes of additional carbon dioxide that would be pumped into the atmosphere unless they are halted. The investigation uncovered 195 “carbon bombs” – projects that would each result in at least 1bn tonnes of CO2 emissions over their lifetimes – and found that the dozen biggest oil companies were on track to spend $103m a day for the rest of the decade, exploiting new fields of oil and gas that could not be burned if global heating was to be limited to well under 2C.

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Match ID: 100 Score: 17.86 source: www.theguardian.com age: 4 days
qualifiers: 17.86 mit

Simple, Cheap, and Portable: A Filter-Free Desalination System for a Thirsty World
Tue, 17 May 2022 17:08:25 +0000


MIT researchers have developed a prototype of a suitcase-size device that can turn seawater into safe drinking water.

According to the International Desalination Association, more than 300 million people around the world now get their drinking water from the sea. With climate change exacerbating water scarcity globally, seawater desalination is stepping in to fill the void. But whereas commercial desalination plants are designed to meet large-scale demand, there is also a need for portable systems that can be carried into remote regions or set up as stand-ins for municipal water works in the wake of a disaster.

A group of scientists from MIT has developed just such a portable desalination unit; it’s the size of a medium suitcase and weighs less than 10 kilograms. The unit’s one-button operation requires no technical knowledge. What’s more, it has a completely filter-free design. Unlike existing portable desalination systems based on reverse osmosis, the MIT team’s prototype does not need any high-pressure pumping or maintenance by technicians.

The MIT researchers described their invention in a paper titled “Portable Seawater Desalination System for Generating Drinkable Water in Remote Locations.” The paper was posted in the 14 April online edition of Environmental Science & Technology, a publication of the American Chemical Society.

The unit uses produces 0.3 liters of potable drinking water per hour, while consuming a minuscule 9 watt-hours of energy. Plant-scale reverse-osmosis water-treatment operations may be three to four times as energy efficient, and yield far greater quantities of freshwater at much faster rates, but the researchers say the trade-off in terms of weight and size makes their invention the first and only entrant in a new desalination niche.

The most notable feature of the unit is its unfiltered design. A filter is a barrier that catches the impurities you don’t want in your water, explains Jongyoon Han, an electrical and biological engineer, and lead author of the study. “We don’t have that specifically because it always tends to clog, and [then] you need to replace it.” This makes traditional portable systems challenging for laypeople to use. Instead, the researchers use ion-concentration polarization (ICP) and electrodialysis (ED) to separate the salt from the water.

“Instead of filtering, we are nudging the contaminants [in this case, salt] away from the water,” Han says. This portable unit, he adds, is a good demonstration of the effectiveness of ICP desalination technology. “It is quite different from other technologies, in the sense that I can remove both large particles and solids all together.”

Hands hold a frame which contains a white rectangle of material with 6 strips on top of it. The setup includes a two-stage ion-concentration polarization (ICP) process, with water flowing through six modules in the first stage and then three in the second stage, followed by a single electrodialysis process.M. Scott Brauer

ICP uses an ion-selective membrane that allows the passage of one kind of ion when current is applied—either cations or anions. “What happens is that, [if] these membranes can transfer only cations, what about the anions?” Han asks. “The anions disappear near the membrane because nature really doesn’t like free ions hanging around…. So, [as a result, there is a region] near the membrane that is salt-free.” The salt-free region is the spot from which freshwater is harvested.

“What is unique about our technology is that we figured out a way to separate…a diverse array of contaminants [from water] in a single process,” says Han. “So we can go [straight] from seawater to drinkable water.”

It takes 40 liters of seawater to yield a single liter of drinking water. This 2.5 percent recovery rate might seem like a high environmental cost, says Junghyo Yoon, a researcher at Han’s lab. But Yoon reminds us that seawater is an infinite resource, so a low recovery rate is not a significant issue.

A hand adjusts a screw on a white box which sandwiches beige layers of material. The portable device does not require any replacement filters, which greatly reduces the long-term maintenance requirements.M. Scott Brauer

The MIT group’s device is an out-of-the box system; you can just power it up, connect it to a saltwater source, and wait for potable water. “The box includes the battery and…[it is] like a typical laptop battery, anywhere between 60 and 100 watts,” Han says. “We think that that can operate for about a day or so.” A solar panel is another option, especially in a disaster zone, where there might not be an accessible electric power source.

Yoon points out that the results reported in the group’s paper are already a year old. “[Since we recorded the results listed in the paper], we have successfully ramped up the desalination rate to 1 liter [of freshwater] per hour,” he reports. “We are pushing ourselves to scale up to 10 liters per hour for practical applications.” He hopes to secure enough investment by the end of this year to take the next steps toward commercialization. “We expect that we can have the first prototype available for beta testing by the end of 2023. [We predict that] he cost will be [US] $1,500,” says Yoon.

That price will be far cheaper than portable desalination systems currently on the market—mostly models using reverse-osmosis filtration, which go for around $5,000. “Although they have higher flow rates and generate a larger amount of clean water because [they] are bigger, they are generally not so user friendly,” Han says. “Our system is much smaller, and uses much less power. And the goal here is to generate just enough water, in a manner that is very user friendly to address this particular need of disaster relief.”

Aside from the flow rate, Han is also not happy with the device’s energy consumption at present. “We don’t think is actually optimal,” he says. “Although [its energy efficiency] is good enough, it can always be made better by optimizing the [process].”


Match ID: 101 Score: 17.86 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 4 days
qualifiers: 17.86 mit

U.N. Kills Any Plans to Use Mercury as a Rocket Propellant
Tue, 19 Apr 2022 18:00:01 +0000


A recent United Nations provision has banned the use of mercury in spacecraft propellant. Although no private company has actually used mercury propellant in a launched spacecraft, the possibility was alarming enough—and the dangers extreme enough—that the ban was enacted just a few years after one U.S.-based startup began toying with the idea. Had the company gone through with its intention to sell mercury propellant thrusters to some of the companies building massive satellite constellations over the coming decade, it would have resulted in Earth’s upper atmosphere being laced with mercury.

Mercury is a neurotoxin. It’s also bio-accumulative, which means it’s absorbed by the body at a faster rate than the body can remove it. The most common way to get mercury poisoning is through eating contaminated seafood. “It’s pretty nasty,” says Michael Bender, the international coordinator of the Zero Mercury Working Group (ZMWG). “Which is why this is one of the very few instances where the governments of the world came together pretty much unanimously and ratified a treaty.”

Bender is referring to the 2013 Minamata Convention on Mercury, a U.N. treaty named for a city in Japan whose residents suffered from mercury poisoning from a nearby chemical factory for decades. Because mercury pollutants easily find their way into the oceans and the atmosphere, it’s virtually impossible for one country to prevent mercury poisoning within its borders. “Mercury—it’s an intercontinental pollutant,” Bender says. “So it required a global treaty.”

Today, the only remaining permitted uses for mercury are in fluorescent lighting and dental amalgams, and even those are being phased out. Mercury is otherwise found as a by-product of other processes, such as the burning of coal. But then a company hit on the idea to use it as a spacecraft propellant.

In 2018, an employee at Apollo Fusion approached the Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER), a nonprofit that investigates environmental misconduct in the United States. The employee—who has remained anonymous—alleged that the Mountain View, Calif.–based space startup was planning to build and sell thrusters that used mercury propellant to multiple companies building low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite constellations.

Four industry insiders ultimately confirmed that Apollo Fusion was building thrusters that utilized mercury propellant. Apollo Fusion, which was acquired by rocket manufacturing startup Astra in June 2021, insisted that the composition of its propellant mixture should be considered confidential information. The company withdrew its plans for a mercury propellant in April 2021. Astra declined to respond to a request for comment for this story.

Apollo Fusion wasn’t the first to consider using mercury as a propellant. NASA originally tested it in the 1960s and 1970s with two Space Electric Propulsion Tests (SERT), one of which was sent into orbit in 1970. Although the tests demonstrated mercury’s effectiveness as a propellant, the same concerns over the element’s toxicity that have seen it banned in many other industries halted its use by the space agency as well.

“I think it just sort of fell off a lot of folks’ radars,” says Kevin Bell, the staff counsel for PEER. “And then somebody just resurrected the research on it and said, ‘Hey, other than the environmental impact, this was a pretty good idea.’ It would give you a competitive advantage in what I imagine is a pretty tight, competitive market.”

That’s presumably why Apollo Fusion was keen on using it in their thrusters. Apollo Fusion as a startup emerged more or less simultaneously with the rise of massive LEO constellations that use hundreds or thousands of satellites in orbits below 2,000 kilometers to provide continual low-latency coverage. Finding a slightly cheaper, more efficient propellant for one large geostationary satellite doesn’t move the needle much. But doing the same for thousands of satellites that need to be replaced every several years? That’s a much more noticeable discount.

Were it not for mercury’s extreme toxicity, it would actually make an extremely attractive propellant. Apollo Fusion wanted to use a type of ion thruster called a Hall-effect thruster. Ion thrusters strip electrons from the atoms that make up a liquid or gaseous propellant, and then an electric field pushes the resultant ions away from the spacecraft, generating a modest thrust in the opposite direction. The physics of rocket engines means that the performance of these engines increases with the mass of the ion that you can accelerate.

Mercury is heavier than either xenon or krypton, the most commonly used propellants, meaning more thrust per expelled ion. It’s also liquid at room temperature, making it efficient to store and use. And it’s cheap—there’s not a lot of competition with anyone looking to buy mercury.

Bender says that ZMWG, alongside PEER, caught wind of Apollo Fusion marketing its mercury-based thrusters to at least three companies deploying LEO constellations—One Web, Planet Labs, and SpaceX. Planet Labs, an Earth-imaging company, has at least 200 CubeSats in low Earth orbit. One Web and SpaceX, both wireless-communication providers, have many more. One Web plans to have nearly 650 satellites in orbit by the end of 2022. SpaceX already has nearly 1,500 active satellites aloft in its Starlink constellation, with an eye toward deploying as many as 30,000 satellites before its constellation is complete. Other constellations, like Amazon’s Kuiper constellation, are also planning to deploy thousands of satellites.

In 2019, a group of researchers in Italy and the United States estimated how much of the mercury used in spacecraft propellant might find its way back into Earth’s atmosphere. They figured that a hypothetical LEO constellation of 2,000 satellites, each carrying 100 kilograms of propellant, would emit 20 tonnes of mercury every year over the course of a 10-year life span. Three quarters of that mercury, the researchers suggested, would eventually wind up in the oceans.

That amounts to 1 percent of global mercury emissions from a constellation only a fraction of the size of the one planned by SpaceX alone. And if multiple constellations adopted the technology, they would represent a significant percentage of global mercury emissions—especially, the researchers warned, as other uses of mercury are phased out as planned in the years ahead.

Fortunately, it’s unlikely that any mercury propellant thrusters will even get off the ground. Prior to the fourth meeting of the Minamata Convention, Canada, the European Union, and Norway highlighted the dangers of mercury propellant, alongside ZMWG. The provision to ban mercury usage in satellites was passed on 26 March 2022.

The question now is enforcement. “Obviously, there aren’t any U.N. peacekeepers going into space to shoot down” mercury-based satellites, says Bell. But the 137 countries, including the United States, who are party to the convention have pledged to adhere to its provisions—including the propellant ban.

The United States is notable in that list because as Bender explains, it did not ratify the Minamata Convention via the U.S. Senate but instead deposited with the U.N. an instrument of acceptance. In a 7 November 2013 statement (about one month after the original Minamata Convention was adopted), the U.S. State Department said the country would be able to fulfill its obligations “under existing legislative and regulatory authority.”

Bender says the difference is “weedy” but that this appears to mean that the U.S. government has agreed to adhere to the Minamata Convention’s provisions because it already has similar laws on the books. Except there is still no existing U.S. law or regulation banning mercury propellant. For Bender, that creates some uncertainty around compliance when the provision goes into force in 2025.

Still, with a U.S. company being the first startup to toy with mercury propellant, it might be ideal to have a stronger U.S. ratification of the Minamata Convention before another company hits on the same idea. “There will always be market incentives to cut corners and do something more dangerously,” Bell says.

Update 19 April 2022: In an email, a spokesperson for Astra stated that the company's propulsion system, the Astra Spacecraft Engine, does not use mercury. The spokesperson also stated that Astra has no plans to use mercury propellant and that the company does not have anything in orbit that uses mercury.

Updated 20 April 2022 to clarify that Apollo Fusion was building thrusters that used mercury, not that they had actually used them.


Match ID: 102 Score: 15.71 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 32 days
qualifiers: 9.29 nasa, 3.57 mit, 2.86 planets

Meet the Lunar Gateway’s Robot Caretakers
Thu, 07 Apr 2022 18:40:09 +0000


An integral part of NASA’s plan to return astronauts to the moon this decade is the Lunar Gateway, a space station that will be humanity’s first permanent outpost outside of low Earth orbit. Gateway, a partnership between NASA, the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), is intended to support operations on the lunar surface while also serving as a staging point for exploration to Mars.

Gateway will be significantly smaller than the International Space Station (ISS), initially consisting of just two modules with additional modules to be added over time. The first pieces of the station to reach lunar orbit will be the Power and Propulsion Element (PPE) attached to the Habitation and Logistics Outpost (HALO), scheduled to launch together on a SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket in November 2024. The relatively small size of Gateway is possible because the station won’t be crewed most of the time—astronauts may pass through for a few weeks, but the expectation is that Gateway will spend about 11 months out of the year without anyone on board.


This presents some unique challenges for Gateway. On the ISS, astronauts spend a substantial amount of time on station upkeep, but Gateway will have to keep itself functional for extended periods without any direct human assistance.

“The things that the crew does on the International Space Station will need to be handled by Gateway on its own,” explains Julia Badger, Gateway autonomy system manager at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. “There’s also a big difference in the operational paradigm. Right now, ISS has a mission control that’s full time. With Gateway, we’re eventually expecting to have just 8 hours a week of ground operations.” The hundreds of commands that the ISS receives every day to keep it running will still be necessary on Gateway—they’ll just have to come from Gateway itself, rather than from humans back on Earth.

“It’s a new way of thinking compared to ISS. If something breaks on Gateway, we either have to be able to live with it for a certain amount of time, or we’ve got to have the ability to remotely or autonomously fix it.” —Julia Badger, NASA JSC

To make this happen, NASA is developing a vehicle system manager, or VSM, that will act like the omnipresent computer system found on virtually every science-fiction starship. The VSM will autonomously manage all of Gateway’s functionality, taking care of any problems that come up, to the extent that they can be managed with clever software and occasional input from a distant human. “It’s a new way of thinking compared to ISS,” explains Badger. “If something breaks on Gateway, we either have to be able to live with it for a certain amount of time, or we’ve got to have the ability to remotely or autonomously fix it.”

While Gateway itself can be thought of as a robot of sorts, there’s a limited amount that can be reasonably and efficiently done through dedicated automated systems, and NASA had to find a compromise between redundancy and both complexity and mass. For example, there was some discussion about whether Gateway’s hatches should open and close on their own, and NASA ultimately decided to leave the hatches manually operated. But that doesn’t necessarily mean that Gateway won’t be able to open its hatches without human assistance; it just means that there will be a need for robotic hands rather than human ones.

“I hope eventually we have robots up there that can open the hatches,” Badger tells us. She explains that Gateway is being designed with potential intravehicular robots (IVRs) in mind, including things like adding visual markers to important locations, placing convenient charging ports around the station interior, and designing the hatches such that the force required to open them is compatible with the capabilities of robotic limbs. Parts of Gateway’s systems may be modular as well, able to be removed and replaced by robots if necessary. “What we’re trying to do,” Badger says, “is make smart choices about Gateway’s design that don’t add a lot of mass but that will make it easier for a robot to work within the station.”

A human-sized white humanoid robot with a golden helmet and visor, in front of a task board on the International Space Station Robonaut at its test station in front of a manipulation task board on the ISS.JSC/NASA

NASA already has a substantial amount of experience with IVR. Robonaut 2, a full-size humanoid robot, spent several years on the International Space Station starting in 2011, learning how to perform tasks that would otherwise have to be done by human astronauts. More recently, a trio of cubical, toaster-size, free-flying robots called Astrobees have taken up residence on the ISS, where they’ve been experimenting with autonomous sensing and navigation. A NASA project called ISAAC (Integrated System for Autonomous and Adaptive Caretaking) is currently exploring how robots like Astrobee could be used for a variety of tasks on Gateway, from monitoring station health to autonomously transferring cargo, although at least in the near term, in Badger’s opinion, “maintenance of Gateway, like using robots that can switch out broken components, is going to be more important than logistics types of tasks.”

Badger believes that a combination of a generalized mobile manipulator like Robonaut 2 and a free flyer like Astrobee make for a good team, and this combination is currently the general concept for Gateway IVR. This is not to say that the intravehicular robots that end up on Gateway will look like the robots that have been working on the ISS, but they’ll be inspired by them, and will leverage all of the experience that NASA has gained with its robots on ISS so far. It might also be useful to have a limited number of specialized robots, Badger says. “For example, if there was a reason to get behind a rack, you may want a snake-type of robot for that.”

A casually dressed astronaut holds a toaster-sized cubical robot on the International Space Station An Astrobee robot (this one is named Bumble) on the ISS.JSC/NASA

While NASA is actively preparing for intravehicular robots on Gateway, such robots do not yet exist, and the agency may not be building these robots itself, instead relying on industry partners to deliver designs that meet NASA’s requirements. At launch, and likely for the first several years at least, Gateway will have to take care of itself without internal robotic assistants. However, one of the goals of Gateway is to operate itself completely autonomously for up to three weeks without any contact with Earth at all, mimicking the three-week solar conjunction between Earth and Mars where the sun blocks any communications between the two planets. “I think that we will get IVR on board,” Badger says. “If we really want Gateway to be able to take care of itself for 21 days, IVR is going to be a very important part of that. And having a robot is absolutely something that I think is going to be necessary as we move on to Mars.”

“Having a robot is absolutely something that I think is going to be necessary as we move on to Mars.” —Julia Badger, NASA JSC

Intravehicular robots are just half of the robotic team that will be necessary to keep Gateway running autonomously long-term. Space stations rely on complex external infrastructure for power, propulsion, thermal control, and much more. Since 2001, the ISS has been home to Canadarm2, a 17.6-meter robotic arm, which is able to move around the station to grasp and manipulate objects while under human control from either inside the station or from the ground.

The Canadian Space Agency, in partnership with space technology company MDA, is developing a new robotic-arm system for Gateway, called Canadarm3, scheduled to launch in 2027. Canadarm3 will include an 8.5-meter-long arm for grappling spacecraft and moving large objects, as well as a smaller, more dexterous robotic arm that can be used for delicate tasks. The smaller arm can even repair the larger arm if necessary. But what really sets Canadarm3 apart from its predecessors is how it’s controlled, according to Daniel Rey, Gateway chief engineer and systems manager at CSA. “One of the very novel things about Canadarm3 is its ability to operate autonomously, without any crew required,” Rey says. This capability relies on a new generation of software and hardware that gives the arm a sense of touch as well as the ability to react to its environment without direct human supervision.

“With Canadarm3, we realize that if we want to get ready for Mars, more autonomy will be required.” —Daniel Rey, CSA

Even though Gateway will be a thousand times farther away from Earth than the ISS, Rey explains that the added distance (about 400,000 kilometers) isn’t what really necessitates Canadarm3’s added autonomy. “Surprisingly, the location of Gateway in its orbit around the moon has a time delay to Earth that is not all that different from the time delay in low Earth orbit when you factor in various ground stations that signals have to pass through,” says Rey. “With Canadarm3, we realize that if we want to get ready for Mars, where that will no longer be the case, more autonomy will be required.”

Canadarm3’s autonomous tasks on Gateway will include external inspection, unloading logistics vehicles, deploying science payloads, and repairing Gateway by swapping damaged components with spares. Rey tells us that there will also be a science logistics airlock, with a moving table that can be used to pass equipment in and out of Gateway. “It’ll be possible to deploy external science, or to bring external systems inside for repair, and for future internal robotic systems to cooperate with Canadarm3. I think that’ll be a really exciting thing to see.”

Even though it’s going to take a couple of extra years for Gateway’s robotic residents to arrive, the station will be operating mostly autonomously (by necessity) as soon as the Power and Propulsion Element and the Habitation and Logistics Outpost begin their journey to lunar orbit in November o2024. Several science payloads will be along for the ride, including heliophysics and space weather experiments.

Gateway itself, though, is arguably the most important experiment of all. Its autonomous systems, whether embodied in internal and external robots or not, will be undergoing continual testing, and Gateway will need to prove itself before we’re ready to trust its technology to take us into deep space. In addition to being able to operate for 21 days without communications, one of Gateway’s eventual requirements is to be able to function for up to three years without any crew visits. This is the level of autonomy and reliability that we’ll need to be prepared for our exploration of Mars, and beyond.


Match ID: 103 Score: 15.71 source: spectrum.ieee.org age: 44 days
qualifiers: 9.29 nasa, 3.57 mit, 2.86 planets

Taking Cosmology to the Far Side of the Moon
Wed, 19 Jan 2022 16:08:15 +0000


A team of Chinese researchers are planning to use the moon as a shield to detect otherwise hard-to-observe low frequencies of the electromagnetic spectrum and open up a new window on the universe. The Discovering the Sky at the Longest Wavelengths (DSL) mission aims to seek out faint, low-frequency signals from the early cosmos using an array of 10 satellites in lunar orbit. If it launches in 2025 as planned, it will offer one of the very first glimpses of the universe through a new lens.

Nine “sister” spacecraft will mak